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Connecting the 3 Dragon Heads - Examining Unique Similarities


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#1 pobeb

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:00 AM

(Disclaimer:  If you do not subscribe to the idea that R+L=J, this theory is not for you;  it is dependent on believing that the text proves Jon as Rhaegar and Lyanna’s son.)

 

The dragon has three heads. There are two men in the world who I can trust, if I can find them. I will not be alone then. We will be three against the world, like Aegon and his sisters.

 

Daenerys VI, A Storm of Swords

 

 

The theory is that Daenerys, Jon, and Tyrion are the 3 heads of the dragon because they are so uniquely similar to one another.

 

I support this theory by drawing a list of similarities shared between all 3 characters; similarities which meet a specific criteria:

 

1) The similarities are independent of one another - i.e., not directly influenced by.

 

2) The validity of these similarities is not determined by other, irrelevant, dissimilarities.  

 

    Example:

 

Dany being a female (dissimilarity) doesn’t make it false that she has a dead lover (similarity).

 

3) Every set of similarities applies to all 3 characters.

  

   Example:

 

           Daenerys, Jon, Tyrion, and Arya have all slain a villain.

 

However, Arya does not have a mother who died in childbirth, nor has she had a lover who has died.

 

Therefore, Arya does not meet the aforementioned criteria that applies to the other 3 characters.

 

 

Now that we’re on the same page, I have divided my list of similarities in order to discourage the argument that if one similarity is wrong, all are wrong.  The list is divided into 2 categories:

 

Factual Similarities - proven in the text  (see disclaimer)

 

and

 

Interpreted Similarities - debatable

 

 

These are the Factual Similarities:

 

1) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion each slew their mother in childbirth.

- Rhaella, Lyanna, Joanna

 

2) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion each are the 3rd child to a parent who only has 3 children.

- Dany is 3rd born to Rhaella

- Jon is 3rd born to Rhaegar

- Tyrion is 3rd born to Joanna

 

3) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion are each from the sibling paradigm: Male/Male/Female (a paradigm which is present in their own connection: Jon/Tyrion/Daenerys)

- Rhaegar/Viserys/Daenerys

- Jon/Aegon/Rhaenys

- Tyrion/Jaime/Cersei

 

4) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have each lived the life of an outcast.

- Daenerys is a vigilante

- Jon is a bastard

- Tyrion is a dwarf

 

5) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have each defended the innocent.

- Daenerys defends the slaves from the masters

- Tyrion defends the people of King’s Landing from Stannis

- Jon defends the realm from the Wildlings/Others

 

6) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion each kill someone who has A ) Been in a position of power, and B ) Threatened their way of life

- Dany kills Kraznys (who is the the head slaver in Astapor); who would have taken Drogon away (threatening Dany's way of life)

- Jon kills Janos (who was the Commander of the City Watch); who would undermined everything Jon was working for in the NW (threatening Jon's way of life)

- Tyrion kills Tywin (who was Lord of Casterly Rock and Hand of the King); who would have executed him or sent him to the wall (threatening his way of life)

 

7) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have had a lover who has died.

- Drogo

- Ygritte

- Shae

 

8) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have each held a position of authority.

- Dany has been Khaleesi and Queen

- Jon has been Lord Commander of the Night’s Watch

- Tyrion has been Hand of the King

 

9) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have each had an attempt on their life.

- The warlocks in Qarth attempt to assassinate Dany (Manticore)

- Cersei attempts to assassinate Tyrion (Mandon Moore)

- Bowen Marsh and Co. attempt to assassinate Jon (Daggers in the dark)

 

10) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion have all been betrayed.

- Mirri Mah Durz betrays Dany

- Bowen and Co. betray Jon

- Shae betrays Tyrion

 

 

 

These are the Interpreted Similarities:

 


1) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion are all half-Targaryen

 

Each combination of parents and child need to be fully explain:

 

- A+J=T

 

I imagine this is being met by nods from some and groans from many others.  What evidence is there to suggest he’s anything less than a full blooded Lannister?


Let’s examine some of the source material in this regard:

 

“... I cannot prove that you are not mine.”

 

Tyrion I, A Storm of Swords

 

“prove” is the stand-out word in this sentence.  When Tywin says “prove”, it doesn’t just play on his hatred for Tyrion, it connotes doubt.  Tywin has doubts that Tyrion is his.  But, why wouldn’t Tywin be absolutely certain?  If Tywin loved Joanna, and she certainly doesn’t seem a whore, why doubt?  Well:

 

“Prince Aerys … as a youth, he was taken with (Joanna) of Casterly Rock, a cousin of Tywin Lannister. When she and Tywin wed, (Aerys) drank too much wine at the wedding feast and was heard to say that it was a great pity that the lord’s right to the first night had been abolished. A drunken jape, no more, but Tywin Lannister was not a man to forget such words, or the … the liberties (Aerys) took during the bedding.

 

Daenerys VII, A Dance with Dragons

 

Mind you, I don’t believe the “liberties” suggest he claimed first night.  I think Aerys’ antics during the bedding were simply meant to highlight Aerys’ lust for Joanna.  So, given that Joanna was not a whore, that Aerys was a mad rapist who lusted for her, and Tywin’s paternity doubts, one can conclude that Aerys most likely raped Joanna at some point; Tyrion being their bastard.

 

“You . . . you are no . . . no son of mine.”

 

Tyrion XI, A Storm of Swords

 

Indeed.

 

 

Outside the implications of his father being a dragon (Targaryen), Tyrion also has multiple other connections to dragons:

 

“When I was your age, I used to dream of having a dragon of my own … Even a stunted, twisted, ugly little boy can look down over the world when he’s seated on a dragon’s  back … I  used  to  start  fires  in  the bowels of Casterly Rock and stare at the flames for hours, pretending they were dragonfire.”

 

Tyrion II, A Game of Thrones

 

“What do you see in those flames?”

“Dragons old  and young, true and false, bright and dark. And you. A small man with a big shadow, snarling in the midst of all.”

 

Tyrion VIII, A Dance with Dragons

 

Several times throughout the series dragons, or their presence, are associated with big shadows.

 

 

 
Spoiler

 

Tyrion, Winds of Winter Excerpt

 

A sign from the old gods, in the form of a white cyvasse dragon.

 

 

A terrible beauty. Like dragonfire. Tyrion wondered if Aegon the Conqueror had felt like this as he flew above his Field of Fire.

 

Tyrion, ACoK

 

 

Here we see Tyrion marveling at the wildfire he had set off in the Blackwater.  He then wonders if Aegon (another dragon) felt the same way he did.

 

These next series of quotes and explanations detail how Tyrion survived falling in and swallowing part of the Rhoyne:

 

When he opened his mouth to curse them all, black water filled his lungs, and the dark closed in around him.

 

Tyrion V, ADwD

 

Tyrion opens his mouth, and swallows death (the Rhoyne)

 

“How long must I continue to torture myself? When will we be certain that I’m clean?”

“Truly?” said the Halfmaester. “Never. You swallowed half the river.

 

Tyrion VI, ADwD

 

Tyrion didn’t just come in contact with the river, he swallowed a good portion of it.  Shortly after, we’re shown the potency of the Rhoyne's greyscale infested waters once we see how quickly it has affected Jon Cunnington:

 

The nail on his middle finger had turned as black as jet, he saw, and the grey had crept up almost to the first knuckle. The tip of his ring finger had begun to darken too, and when he touched it with the point of his dagger, he felt nothing.

 

The Lost Lord, ADwD

 

So, how does Tyrion survive swallowing the waters of the Rhoyne when Griff was afflicted to easily?

Well:

 

The eyes were where a dragon was most vulnerable. The eyes, and the brain behind them. Not the underbelly, as certain old tales would have it. The scales there were just as tough as those along a dragon’s back and flanks. And not down the gullet either. That was madness. These would-be dragonslayers might as well try to quench a fire with a spear thrust. “Death comes out of the dragon’s mouth,” Septon Barth had written in his Unnatural History, “but death does not go in that way.”

 

Tyrion XI, ADwD

 

I don’t believe it’s coincidence that Tyrion so specifically swallows a form of liquid death, survives, and reflects on this specific passage in Septon Barth’s writings.  Tyrion doesn’t contract greyscale because he is a dragon; death comes out of his mouth, not the other way around.

 

 

2) B+R=D

 

 

3) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion represent each part of the Undying Triplet:

 

. . . three heads has the dragon . . . . three fires must you light . . . one for life and one for death and one to love . . . three mounts must you ride . . . one to bed and one to dread and one to love . . . three treasons will you know . . . once for blood and once for gold and once for love . . .

 

Daenerys, ACoK

 

I explain each of these in posts further down the thread:

 

Three fire must you light

 

Three mounts must you ride

 

Three treasons will you know

 

 

And last, but not least:

 

 

4) Dany, Jon, and Tyrion represent the 3 things used to forge Lightbringer:

 

“Do you know the tale of the forging of Lightbringer? I shall tell it to you. It was a time when darkness lay heavy on the world. To oppose it, the hero must have a hero’s blade, oh, like none that had ever been. And so for thirty days and thirty nights Azor Ahai labored sleepless in the temple, forging a blade in the sacred fires. Heat and hammer and fold, heat and hammer and fold, oh, yes, until the sword was done. Yet when he plunged it into water to temper the steel it burst asunder. “Being a hero, it was not for him to shrug and go in search of excellent grapes such as these, so again he began. The second time it took him fifty days and fifty nights, and this sword seemed even finer than the first. Azor Ahai captured a lion, to temper the blade by plunging it through the beast’s red heart, but once more the steel shattered and split. Great was his woe and great was his sorrow then, for he knew what he must do. “A hundred days and a hundred nights he labored on the third blade, and as it glowed white-hot in the sacred fires, he summoned his wife. ‘Nissa Nissa,’ he said to her, for that was her name, ‘bare your breast, and know that I love you best of all that is in this world.’ She did this thing, why I cannot say, and Azor Ahai thrust the smoking sword through her living heart. It is said that her cry of anguish and ecstasy left a crack across the face of the moon, but her blood and her soul and her strength and her courage all went into the steel. Such is the tale of the forging of Lightbringer, the Red Sword of Heroes.”

 

Davos , ACoK

 

- The water used first to temper lightbringer represents the birth of Dany, born in the midst of a storm.  

- The lion used to temper lightbringer represents the birth of Tyrion, born in the home of the lions - Casterly Rock.

           - The love of Nissa Nissa used to temper lightbringer represents Jon, born of love in the Tower of Joy.

 

 

Through these multiple connections, I believe Jon, Tyrion, and Daenerys are the 3 heads of the dragon, and will be the key players in the "war for the dawn".


Edited by pobeb, 17 July 2014 - 01:05 PM.


#2 THElogic

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:10 AM

Damn. I had similar theories but you took it to the next level. Well done. 



#3 galileo

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:16 AM

Plausible theory. Good observation.

#4 joyful1

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 02:48 AM

Very interesting theory, I would never have made the connections!

#5 jon Rhaegar stark

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 04:48 AM

 each of them are third born to their parents or parent

 

Danny third child of aerys ,jon third child of Rhaegar,tyrion third son of tywin

 

in the same vision danny gets called daughter of three

 

i dont know how danny is daughter of three but jon was son of three where is real parents are Rhaegar and lyanna .Ned took him aqs son when they died

 

i dont know or believe that tyrion is son of aerys ..if he is then he is also son of three

 

some say the name of danny foreshadows her two fathers dayne and aerys combined  gives daenarys ...which also i have hard time believing it



#6 Donnelly

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 05:19 AM

I always thought that Ygritte being 'kissed by fire', and the fact that Jon was indirectly responsible for her death, may have something to do with Lightbringer



#7 Toth

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 06:27 AM

I always expected the THREE in a certain House of Undying Prophecy has also something to do with them:

 

 

Three fires must you light... one for life and one for death and one to love... three mounts must you ride... one to bed and one to dread and one to love... three treasons will you know... once for blood and once for gold and once for love...

 

 

Three fires must you light:

life      - Dany burning Drogo and the Maegi for the birth of the dragons

death - Tyrion burning the Blackwater river at the Battle for KL

love - Jon burning Ygritte so that she won't become an Other (?)

 

Three mounts must you ride

bed - Dany and Drogo in a not so metaphorical way

dread - Tyrions travels through Essos (?)

love - Jon mounting his horse in an attempt to rescue 'Arya' (?)

EDIT: Not Arya, but to help Robb back in book 1. He never got to his horse in ADwD.

 

Three treasons will you know

blood - Dany betraying Mirri Maz Dur for her Blood Magic

gold - Tyrion betraying Tysha by raping her and giving her a gold coin

love  - Jon betraying his Nightswatch oath by sleeping with Ygritte

 

Though I believe that the ones with a (?) will be replaced by events in the remaining books.


Edited by Toth, 17 June 2014 - 03:52 PM.


#8 jon Rhaegar stark

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 06:59 AM

 

Three treasons will you know

blood - Dany betraying Mirri Maz Dur for her Blood Magic

gold - Tyrion betraying Tysha by raping her and giving her a gold coin

love  - Jon betraying his Nightswatch oath by sleeping with Ygritte

 


i cant say i actually believe in your theory but i think you can  make that betrayal for gold as shae betraying tyrion for gold which seems more possible for your theory



#9 LadyLiz

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 07:09 AM

Wow very well thought out.  I have definitely heard the Tyrion is a Targaryen theory before but never laid out so clearly.  Very convincing :D



#10 Wellington

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 07:34 AM

I think you are reaching on Jon Snow with the "slaying a tyrant with their preferred weapon" claim. Janos Slynt is nothing.


Edited by Wellington, 17 June 2014 - 07:35 AM.


#11 The Doctor's Consort

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 07:37 AM

Very very interesting I don't buy it, for various reason but it is interesting.


Edited by Jon's Queen Consort, 20 June 2014 - 03:30 PM.


#12 John Suburbs

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 08:26 AM

Quote

“Do you know the tale of the forging of Lightbringer? I shall tell it to you. It was a time when darkness lay heavy on the world. To oppose it, the hero must have a hero’s blade, oh, like none that had ever been. And so for thirty days and thirty nights Azor Ahai labored sleepless in the temple, forging a blade in the sacred fires. Heat and hammer and fold, heat and hammer and fold, oh, yes, until the sword was done. Yet when he plunged it into water to temper the steel it burst asunder. “Being a hero, it was not for him to shrug and go in search of excellent grapes such as these, so again he began. The second time it took him fifty days and fifty nights, and this sword seemed even finer than the first. Azor Ahai captured a lion, to temper the blade by plunging it through the beast’s red heart, but once more the steel shattered and split. Great was his woe and great was his sorrow then, for he knew what he must do. “A hundred days and a hundred nights he labored on the third blade, and as it glowed white-hot in the sacred fires, he summoned his wife. ‘Nissa Nissa,’ he said to her, for that was her name, ‘bare your breast, and know that I love you best of all that is in this world.’ She did this thing, why I cannot say, and Azor Ahai thrust the smoking sword through her living heart. It is said that her cry of anguish and ecstasy left a crack across the face of the moon, but her blood and her soul and her strength and her courage all went into the steel. Such is the tale of the forging of Lightbringer, the Red Sword of Heroes.”

 

Davos , ACoK

 

 

I can see this as applying to Tyrion specifically, but in reverse order:

 

First he kills Shae = death of Nissa Nissa

Then he kills Tywin = death of the lion

Then he 'drowns' in the Rhoyne = plunged into water

 

Therefore, Tyrion = Lightbringer



#13 Rhaegar the Dragon Prince

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 08:37 AM

Damned good theory. The only problem is that if Tywin suspected that Tyrion was not his then he would have just had him killed as in infant. 



#14 LadyLiz

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 09:03 AM

Damned good theory. The only problem is that if Tywin suspected that Tyrion was not his then he would have just had him killed as in infant. 

He could not prove it though.  His wife died and he loved her, I can imagine her saying something on her deathbed or even Kevan recommending caution.  He could not know whether it was his or not and him being so dedicated to family would not kill a son which could be his.



#15 TheDarkEye

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 09:41 AM

It seems reasonable but i will hate it so much if it turns out Tyrion isn't really Tywin's son.



#16 oursisthefury69

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 09:41 AM

Good job

 

. Your point on "a Dance with Dragons" is better than you'd give it credit for, given the title and that they are the 3 character arcs described on the back of the book as well as the 3 main ones in the book.

 

.  There's many and more points in favor of Tyrion being Aery's bastard (without even including his suspicious physical appearance I.e mismatched eyes white hair) and or riding a dragon.  Its also important to consider Tywin and Aery's complicated relationship throughout Tywins tenure as hand, where Aerys was constantly feeling undermined and seemingly jealous of Tywin, who'd just married his cousin Joanna who had grown up at court with Aerys sister Rhaella, theres plenty more to that story

 

I'm also glad to see somebody referencing the "small man with a big shadow," a key point in my mind.  It would certainly make more sense for Tyrion to be casting a large shadow if he were atop a dragon, shadows are frequently associated with both dragons and fire/fire magic i.e R'hllor being the god of "fire and shadow."  Go back to early Got, I believe its Jon's first or second chapter, where he first meets Tyrion after storming out of the Winterfell dining hall during KIng Robert's visit.  The chapter ends with Jon watching Tyrion open the doors to walk back into the hall, and as the light from the hall expands Tyrion's shadow Jon ends the chapter saying "and for a moment Tyrion Lannister stood tall as a king." 



#17 Toth

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 09:52 AM

 


i cant say i actually believe in your theory but i think you can  make that betrayal for gold as shae betraying tyrion for gold which seems more possible for your theory

 

I appreciated that you are help guessing despite not sharing my beliefs. Well, I can't say I'm that sure myself, but in my view it fits  GRRMs buildup too well to be a coincidence. Shae could also be the treason, but than it would be more Tyrion strangling her with golden hands. If the three heads themselves are the ones committing treasons the irony of Dany getting paranoid about it is simply more fun. And as long as the others fit so well in this prophecy, Tyrion getting beytrayed by Shae would be the odd one of the three and that doesn't feel right.

 

He could not prove it though.  His wife died and he loved her, I can imagine her saying something on her deathbed or even Kevan recommending caution.  He could not know whether it was his or not and him being so dedicated to family would not kill a son which could be his.

 

It's in fact even more complicated. It is stated that she gave birth to Tyrion an died at Casterly Rock while he was at King's Landing acting as Hand. Cersei mentioned something along those lines because Joanna caught her and Jaime making out and would have told him if not for her death before that. In hindsight this makes Aerys' dickmove of making Jaime a Kingsguard truly brilliant if he wanted to install a Targaryen as head of Casterly Rock. I can imagine that Tywin only had suspicions about Aerys and Joanna because of some cruel remarks of the king, but was never able to question Joanna about it (who was probably to scared of his or Aerys' reaction if she went straight to Tywin).

 

I was also quite skeptical towards Tyrion being a Targ and made tried to replace his part in the HoU-triplett with Aegon. But the Opening Post here blew my reasoning away. Their storylines have too much in common to be a coincidence and Aegon being the third dragon simply doesn't fit as well. 



#18 pobeb

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 11:32 AM

I think you are reaching on Jon Snow with the "slaying a tyrant with their preferred weapon" claim. Janos Slynt is nothing.

 

You've got a point.  Ok, I'll rephrase;  How about, "they all slay a villain with their preferred weapon"?

 

Damned good theory. The only problem is that if Tywin suspected that Tyrion was not his then he would have just had him killed as in infant. 

 

This is where the "prove" explanation becomes important.  Tywin may have suspected, but kinslaying is taboo, and Tywin values his reputation.  Given that he couldn't prove whether Tyrion was his one way or another, he simply accepted him and raised him as a Lannister.

 

Good job

 

. Your point on "a Dance with Dragons" is better than you'd give it credit for, given the title and that they are the 3 character arcs described on the back of the book as well as the 3 main ones in the book.

 

.  There's many and more points in favor of Tyrion being Aery's bastard (without even including his suspicious physical appearance I.e mismatched eyes white hair) and or riding a dragon.  Its also important to consider Tywin and Aery's complicated relationship throughout Tywins tenure as hand, where Aerys was constantly feeling undermined and seemingly jealous of Tywin, who'd just married his cousin Joanna who had grown up at court with Aerys sister Rhaella, theres plenty more to that story

 

I'm also glad to see somebody referencing the "small man with a big shadow," a key point in my mind.  It would certainly make more sense for Tyrion to be casting a large shadow if he were atop a dragon, shadows are frequently associated with both dragons and fire/fire magic i.e R'hllor being the god of "fire and shadow."  Go back to early Got, I believe its Jon's first or second chapter, where he first meets Tyrion after storming out of the Winterfell dining hall during KIng Robert's visit.  The chapter ends with Jon watching Tyrion open the doors to walk back into the hall, and as the light from the hall expands Tyrion's shadow Jon ends the chapter saying "and for a moment Tyrion Lannister stood tall as a king." 

 

Yea, I was going to try and use Tyrion's appearance to support my "3 heads" connection, but I was hesitant because I couldn't think of a strong way to present it.  Even though this is series where hair and eye color largely indicate parenthood, and Tyrion has pale blonde hair  (like aerys), and a suspicious "black eye" when eyes are generally not completely black, it's still a tough argument to make.  Just as it's hard to determine why Tywin hated Aerys so much.  Was it because he raped Joanna?  Was it because he stole Jaime away, thus ruining his inheritence?  Or maybe because Aerys was just a mad.  You could make the argument for a couple different reasons, so I chose to leave those particular points unsaid - until now, at least.

 

 each of them are third born to their parents or parent

 

Danny third child of aerys ,jon third child of Rhaegar,tyrion third son of tywin

 

Just added that to the OP.  Thank you!

 

 

I always expected the THREE in a certain House of Undying Prophecy has also something to do with them:

 

 

 

Three fires must you light:

life      - Dany burning Drogo and the Maegi for the birth of the dragons

death - Tyrion burning the Blackwater river at the Battle for KL

love - Jon burning Ygritte so that she won't become an Other (?)

 

Three mounts must you ride

bed - Dany and Drogo in a not so metaphorical way

dread - Tyrions travels through Essos (?)

love - Jon mounting his horse in an attempt to rescue 'Arya' (?)

 

Three treasons will you know

blood - Dany betraying Mirri Maz Dur for her Blood Magic

gold - Tyrion betraying Tysha by raping her and giving her a gold coin

love  - Jon betraying his Nightswatch oath by sleeping with Ygritte

 

Though I believe that the ones with a (?) will be replaced by events in the remaining books.

 

I like this, and I definitely think the pattern of 3 fits perfectly.  I'll have to do more research before I can definitively say what I think it means, but this is an interesting analysis and definitely an interesting supporting point.


Edited by pobeb, 17 June 2014 - 11:59 AM.


#19 CJ McLannister

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 11:42 AM

Looking at your evidence, it could be argues that all three survived things they should not have: Dany walking into fire, Tyrion drinking infected water, and Jon getting stabbed a bunch.  Assuming he survives.


Edited by CJ McLannister, 17 June 2014 - 11:43 AM.


#20 pobeb

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 02:27 PM

So, I've been closely reviewing the Undying's triplet to Dany.  I've only made one connection with the current theory, but I think it's pretty strong:

 

" . . . three treasons will you know . . . once for blood and once for gold and once for love . . ."

 

Before I go into explaining this, I need to highlight one of the connections I made in the OP:

 

- Each hero has had a lover who has died (Drogo, Ygritte, Shae)

 

I'd like to revise this connection as:

 

- Each hero has had a lover who has died (Drogo, Ygritte, Shae) due to a betrayl

 

Now, how this connection applies to the Undying's triplet:

 

So, I think the triplet (overall) follows the pattern of applying to Dany first, then Tyrion, then Jon.

 

In this particular section of the triplet, the treasons are connected in what killed each of our heroes' lovers

 

Blood - This represents the blood magic Mirri Maz Duur used to poison Drogo.  The blood magic betrayed him, and led to his death.

 

Gold - This represents Shae's demise, as she was ultimately killed, not only with a gold chain, but because of her lust for gold.  The gold betrayed her, and led to her death.

 

Love - This represents Ygritte.  Please observe: 

 

“Is that the way of it, Jon Snow?” asked Mance Rayder, mildly. “Her and you?”
It was easy to lose your way beyond the Wall.  Jon did not know that he could tell honor from shame anymore, or right from wrong. Father forgive me. “Yes,” he said.
Mance nodded. “Good. You’ll go with Jarl and Styr on the morrow, then. Both of you. Far be it from me to separate two hearts that beat as one.”

 

As you can see, Ygritte was sent with Jon (up and over the wall) because she was in love with him, which eventually led to her death.  So, her love betrayed her to her death.

 

 

Now, to try and decrypt the 2 other parts of the triplet...  I'm already working on a theory for the fire section, but that mount section looks so much like it solely applies to Dany that it makes me wonder if the triplet applies (in all parts) to the three heroes in their own separate way. 


Edited by pobeb, 21 June 2014 - 12:55 AM.