Chicxulub

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About Chicxulub

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  1. That's legitimately disappointing.
  2. This popped up out of the blue on YouTube three days ago, and no one seems to know anything about it. I realize that even with the incredible production value of this trailer that it's probably just some fan vid, but the concept is awesome. I'd watch this. What do you guys think?
  3. Hey all! This afternoon I was listening to Radio Westeros, in particular the second episode on the Daynes with Azizal and LmL. Early on these fine gentlemen were discussing Starfall itself and the fact that it was on an island at the mouth of the Torrentine. The idea was put forth that this wouldn't really make sense to be the place where the moon/comet meteor would have landed. These gentlemen went on to postulate that the Dawn meteor was found elsewhere and was brought with them to this strategically placed island. Well, I would respectfully disagree. It is important to note that the ideas presented here are dependant upon some sort of LmL's impact winter theory proving to be true. This sounds like the EXACT kind of place that a meteor would have landed. This sounds like the type of impact structure that our world's iteration of maesters with a bronze link would call a peak ring crater. A falling meteor would land in the shallow seas (or even on the land near the sea if the Citadel's theory of sea level change is correct) and would have created a crater. Now of course there are a lot of different factors that go into the creation and final morphology of a crater, and I don't pretend to be an expert on these factors, but it is entirely plausible that the mountain in which Starfall is built is in fact the central peak of an impact crater. Over the 12 millennia some this supposedly happened, the exterior walls of the crater could have been worn down by the raging waters of the Torrentine or simply inundated by the rising Summer Sea, if the maesters can be believed. While we're at it, one can't help but notice the general similarity in structure expressed by the God's Eye, which also appears to be a peak ring crater. Whether or not the God's Eye is related to the Long Night as Starfall appears to be is dubious at best, but is worth noting. I doubt that the God's Eye, if it is a crater indeed, was related due to the fact that the Pact with the CoTF took place on the Isle of Faces long before the long night. Anyway, that's my humble little observation. I hope the community finds it agreeable.
  4. After the Pact and peace, the CotF tried to end the Others, and SHTF. Think Skynet.
  5. Because sometime after the Pact, they lost control of their weapon. This is why the Last Hero was actually helped by the CotF, it was in their mutual interest to help. It's also worth noting that this may be a very dumbed down version of how things played out compared to what we'll get in the books.
  6. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/robwazhere/dawn_zps7adgiaek.jpg Now I know that Dawn doesn't really look like it's described in the books, but then again in this show, WHAT DOES? Lol. What other bright, whitish, ripply Valyrian steel looking sword could Arthur Dayne possibly be carrying?
  7. You're not popping any balloons! I think you misunderstood me my friend. I wasn't attempting to defend the show having him dual wield, rather just defend the portrayal of a man who holds the office of Sword of the Morning HAVING an arming sword in addition to a dagger and Dawn is canon, as (sorta) depicted in the show. And in the World Book, it states that man is a Sword of the Morning, but it does NOT state that it is Arthur Dayne. My point about the plausibility in our magical world is simply that if we're going to suspend belief on some things, the idea that someone is capable of doing something that's not possible in reality should be considered. I've never really understood how people can quibble over realism on things in a high fantasy book, but that's just me.
  8. Hello, Before the forum upgrade, there was a low-bandwidth skin that was a default for the forum that made browsing easy for those of us on mobile, but who also live out in the country where fast wireless isn't available. Is there a way to change the skins? I'm not familiar with the software that this forum uses and I can't seem to find it. If there isn't currently a low bandwidth mobile skin, are there any plans for one? This really pretty, high resolution layout is wonderful on a PC, I have to give you that, but when I try to access this forum from my phone on my lunch break (for example), it can take 2-3 minutes just for the banner image to load. It is quite frustrating. Thank you, Rob
  9. It means that your post hasn't been approved for public dissemination by the staff yet.
  10. Guys, Dawn was unquestionably present in this episode. I know that quite a few people have said this already, but here is a good screenshot I took showing quite clearly the rippling. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/robwazhere/dawn_zps7adgiaek.jpg Now I know that Dawn doesn't really look like it's described in the books, but then again in this show, WHAT DOES? Lol. What other bright, whitish, ripply Valyrian steel looking sword could Arthur Dayne possibly be carrying? Also, in the entire ASOIAF series, there is only (as far I as I know anyway) only one canon image/detailed description of a Sword of the Morning which appears anywhere. It is very much worth noting that the only known example of a canon Sword of the Morning is wearing a second long sword EXACTLY as the show depicted Ser Arthur to do. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v243/robwazhere/13180889_10154132599759417_1919009390_n_zpshn2wabqk.jpg This makes a ton of sense thematically as well. In order to become the SotM, one must first become an incredibly skilled warrior. Said incredibly skilled warrior had to EARN Dawn, which means that he didn't get it at 12 to begin training with. It stands to reason that someone who earns the right to be called SotM and carry Dawn would probably have an extremely fine castleforged blade, and many men who have worked long and hard with such a blade would probably be loath to part with it. Like it or not, the show seems to have gotten Arthur more 'right' than many here want to admit. Does this mean that the SotM/Ser Arthur would dual wield them? No, it doesn't. However, it's not outside of the realm of the possible that a peerless warrior COULD successfully do it in a universe where we have eight foot tall dudes crushing people's skulls, ice demons, dragons and blood magic.
  11. OMFG yes. Since the migration, I've damn near stopped coming here because it's sooo slow on mobile.
  12. I was always under the impression that the Common Tongue was a First Men language that blossomed after the Long Night. The Long Night and the raising of the Wall is what cut the wildlings off from the south, geographically and culturally. Another point to consider is that there DOES seem to be some regional differentiation in dialect, though for simplicity's sake, it doesn't make it into text. There's a Tyrion chapter in ADWD where he's talking about making up his story for Hugor, and he says how he has to be some Westerman's bastard, because he sounds like a highborn Westerman. For the most part, Tyrion's speech patterns don't read any differently than any other educated character, so that implies a regional dialect that GRRM simply didn't write in for ease of reading.
  13. Widows Wail is going to end up with Arya, who knows that it is half of Ice, after she outgrows Needle. It is known.
  14. I think that many people aren't seeing Asshai in a big enough picture. Yes, Asshai is in the story to provide an element of mystery and vastness to Planetos. But, in traditional GRRM fashion, he didn't leave his smoking gun unloaded. Asshai by the Shadow, and its less often mentioned, but far more corrupt, sister city Stygai in the Shadow (among many other things in the world) are ruins from an earlier time and an earlier civilization. I don't think that the author would give us two ruined cities at the heart of a fallen legendary empire only to have it have no meaning. We're talking the Great Empire of the Dawn, and the calamity that brought it low. The GEotD existed before the Long Night. Legends from the East hold that it was the actions of the last Emperor who caused the Long Night, or at least did things most nefarious immediately before the Long Night. Lucifer Means Lightbringer has done a fantastic series of essays on this. While Asshai does serve to expand the world and add an element of mystery, it also serves a greater purpose: to provide depth to the prophesies of Azor Ahai and the Prince That Was Promised. The Great Empire of the Dawn was that father of Valyria: an ancient civilization of dragon riders with platinum hair and gemstone eyes. If the legends are true, it would appear as though the GEotD was by all accounts far greater than Valyria ever was. The Doom destroyed Valyria. The end of the GEotD resulted in no less than the complete destruction of all the civilizations of the world, through a magical version of a nuclear winter that was the Long Night. Asshai will provide us answers, and already has. Dany is the Princess who was Promised. She is not going to restore Valyria, she is going to restore the Great Empire. She will correct the Blood Betrayal, she is the Amethyst Empress reborn. Her answers will come from Asshai, even if she never goes there herself. EDIT- Throw in a "the night is dark and full of terrors" and I sound oddly like Mel... Lol
  15. Page 294, bottom left paragraph, when telling about other things that come with the frozen mists of the far northern stretches of the Shivering Sea. "[...]of mermaids pal of flesh with black scaled tails, far more malign than their sisters to the south."