Rain on Wednesday

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About Rain on Wednesday

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  1. Uh....I love fantasy, but not yours. Where did you get this idea?
  2. I have a theory on Varys that I think explains his motivations, history, etc. This is a summary of that theory, and I want opinions. We know all about Varys's past. We know that he did a lot of funky stuff in the free cities, and gained quite the reputation as a spymaster. He had money and prestige and friends and a home....until Aerys (even the names rhyme, kids) calls him across the narrow sea and asks him to feed his paranoia. Why would Varys do this? We know the answer: influence and vendetta. Reicipients of royal patronage have quite the life, you know. I think he did not care one whit about Westeros or Aerys and simply fed the Targaryen troll as much information as he needed to in order to stay in Aerys's good graces while slowly building up power and influence for his own purposes. Aerys needed someone to give form to his mass delusions and Varys had no qualms doing that. He made the realm bleed, like Littlefinger is doing now, for his own gain. Why not? It wasn't his land, these weren't his people...he was quietly playing the game of spider webs. It didn't really matter, because he was sure Robert would lose and Rhaegar would make good on his promise of reforms. If that meant telling Aerys that his son and heir was conspiring against him, big deal. One thing that paranoid, delusional people crave and need like heroin addicts are the "shadows on the wall" and the "knives in the darkness". Whether real or imaginary, they need someone to feed them and believe them. Varys was fine up until the sack of King's Landing. I think this is where his thinking turned around. Suddenly, Rhaegar is dead and Robert is the victor. Stark is on his way to take the city, and Tywin is knocking on Aerys's door. This is the moment where Varys tried to stop what he put in motion by begging Aerys not to open the gates...to no avail. You know the stories, kids. Varys is now on a path to redemption. He saved the Targaryen babes, he even produced a Targaryen cuckoo, just in case the babes got SIDS or stabbed. Who's with me? Oh, and remember: he did get what he wanted, but look at the cost. The worst thing in life is getting what you thought you always wanted.
  3. BORING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  4. OPENING SCENE: Setting: The broken tower of Winterfell. We zoom in from the same window Bran fell from, and we see Tormund in the background, naked (not full frontal, but elegantly covering his manhood with his beard) on some furs, lounging on his back, his elbow bent, propping up his head. In the foreground, we see Brienne hastily buckling her armor back on, saying that this was a huge mistake, and that he caught her in a moment of weakness after the events of Rivverun. He laughs at her as she runs out of the tower and slams the door behind her. She looks at Oathkeeper, and as a single tear runs down her cheek, she whispers, "Jaime...." Then we hear Tormund call through the door, "Bitch! Bring me a sandwich and some Direwolf Ale!" She flushes beet red and runs down the steps as quickly as possible. Then we cut to.... Dany walking on the beach of Dragonstone. Dum dum da da dum dum da da da..... Seriously, who WOULDN'T want to see that?
  5. LOL! That would be a great way to open the season. I think that Jaime will come running into the red keep at some point and say, "Sis...there be dragons..." and she will just laugh at him derisively. Their relationship is going to require a therapist soon anyway. A shot of her looking out over the ruined sept, with her wine glass half full, and then a dragon would be even better. I wonder if she'd be smirking then.
  6. Thank you, GyantSpyder, for that analysis. I found it fascinating. If I may, I have a couple of follow up questions: Would you concur that Daenerys has this particular gene? How pure exactly does her blood have to be for her to seemingly wield such a great amount of influence? Are her prophetic dreams a byproduct of this as well? That is, if her dreams are truly prophetic, which I'm not sure is true. Is there any plausibility that the pyre birth was in some way associated with blood magic? I have always wondered about this. It's quite clear that she has a "destiny" and that the eggs and later dragons are in some way a product of her, I guess you would call it a genetic destiny if we're being as scientific as I can be (I understand the science, but am terrible at expressing that comprehension using the correct language). However, I have reread that scene in A Game of Thrones several times, and have watched it several times, and the maegi seems to make a deduction that Daenerys is trying to pull off blood magic to hatch the eggs; albeit she doesn't think Daenerys knows enough about magic to actually pull it off. Was the maegi's life in anyway integral to the hatching? Or was that just a hunch, or a blunder...or a punishment? This puzzles me. Any other thoughts to how magic works in this world? Jon Snow obviously has magic, especially if you read the books, and Rhaegar was his father so I think that makes sense. What about Melissandre? Or Quaith? Is it something that can be learned, or only passed down through genes? Not just dragon magic, of course. Who, in your opinion, could ride the other dragons? I was thinking Jon Snow on Viserion but Tyrion being a Targaryen just doesn't have enough evidence behind it for me to believe. They have already hatched, so does that mean Targaryen blood at this point in bonding with the dragons is completely necessary? Again, I really appreciate your input. Thanks so much.
  7. How does one actually hatch a dragon's egg? It seems to me that Daenerys used blood magic, but historically, how was it done? Why did they have caches of unhatched eggs and kill themselves trying to hatch them?
  8. I like your reasoning, and while you have many, many good points, here's my take on it: For the show: I would say a "definite" no. There are such discrepancies between the Littlefinger character between the show and in the books. In the show, he's much more obvious and in ADWD, we see the opposite of that. He seems less powerful on the show, less devilishly, ingeniously clever and no where near the point in time and place that he is in the books. In the books, I feel like we are just beginning to understand the web he is weaving, but in the show, we see him for what he is: the spider at the center of a large web. Yes, they have made it clear that he wants and maybe can win the throne, but with only these few episodes left, there would have to be major league changes to see him crowned rather than killed off. Look at the timeliness in the books, and then line them up with the show, and see what you think. He's too obvious at this point for him to produce some other rabbit out of his hat: I think we've seen him lay down his cards, and they aren't going to win him the crown. For the books: I think he's already hovering on the throne. He has a time line all set up and is perturbed that Cersei is making his plans speed up but is calculating the difference and acting accordingly, He is a much smoother, subtler player, and probably controls more variables than we can imagine. Only Varys seems to be in his way. It gets sticky though when we see Varys kill Kevan in ADWD because he's ruining all of Cersei's bad work---that made me pause and consider, for the very first time ever, that Varys and Littlefinger could be in league with each other, but it also equally can mean the opposite. It was puzzling, and so surprising that I think we're going to see a lot more of both of them unfold and be less black and white as they are now portrayed on the screen. So in the books I believe Littlefinger will be the puppeteer, but will he actually claim the crown instead of merely controlling it? No. Why? Because they would have to put it into the show, and if you've read this post, you can see that they're clearly not going to do that.
  9. This ALWAYS pisses me off. You Americans need to go back to World History and seriously rethink things. I haven't responded at all to any of these posts because of this mass delusion--while they were happening, they were called "The Cousins' War". That's what the common people of England called it, and it was retooled into "The War of the Roses" well after everything was settled. Elizabeth of York wrote a letter, of which we have a copy, begging support to marry King Richard who---guess what, Americans!--was not an ugly hunchback. That was Tudor propaganda courtesy of William Shakespeare. They found his bones and recreated his features. Not a hunchback. There is no evidence to support anyone actually killing the princes--that's why it's still a mystery, but if you actually know your history, I would bet that the Duke of Buckingham was in on it whilst Richard was on progress in the North of England, where people remember him fondly to this day, and would spit in the faces of anyone who said otherwise. I really though that people who could get through these books and who would reply to this post would be much more well informed and less prejudiced through the media. It has just stunned me into silence. What a bunch of sophomores. If anyone has any actual idea of English history and chooses to speak up, I would gladly hear them....and maybe become less disgusted with these bovine stereotypes.
  10. Here is my thesis: We will never get an actual determination on who is Azor Ahai or The Prince That Was Promised. Why do I think so? It's because the speculation is all GRRM needs for us to be so intrigued. Why answer a question when we have all been puzzling over it for 20 years? I'm also not convinced that the two are mutually exclusive, or that two people combined couldn't be both. The Stallion that Mounts the World is clearly Daenerys herself, she embraced her son in her dream, and was cleansed by his fire....but it's never said. We will never have sentence that so clearly defines who the prophecy might actually be---especially because most of Westeros is unaware, or doesn't care. This is just a really good idea to put into our heads, but that's it. Just endless speculation. Who's with me?
  11. In a land that is rife with magic and magical creatures, prophecy and miracles, who is to say that any of the gods are not real? They could all just be one god of many faces, or have distinct personalities, but I think what is clear is that if you believe in a god and worship it, in Westeros at least, you'll have some sort of answer to your prayers. R'hlorr is just really, really organized and has magic on his side.
  12. I think one of the most interesting conflicts in the books and in the show is the conflict vs. LF and Varys. Varys does seem genuinely doing this for a higher purpose than his own gain, whereas LF is all about personal gain. LF seems to be "collecting" houses and territories only in the Seven Kingdoms so far, and we know that his eyes are turned towards King's Landing. If he can get the majority of the Seven Kingdoms behind him and capture the capitol in time, they will likely see Daenerys not as a savior or true claimant to the crown, but rather an invader and have even more common cause to unite against her. Especially if he weds Sansa. So, I see Varys bringing in those across the sea to pit them against a united (behind LF) Westeros, and though he has dragons on his side, but dragons aren't everything (ask Dorne). As for how will he deal with the dragons? I still don't think we have enough information to understand that, but we do know that seven kingdoms coming together as one unified host has a MUCH better chance than when they were seven separate kingdoms and thus more easily conquered by Aegon the Dragon. One can be more powerful than five, remember? If LF is on the Iron Throne in time, he stands a good chance in my mind.
  13. Hello. This is my first post and I'm sure it isn't new, but I couldn't find anything using various synonymous search criteria, so here goes: We have had GRRM confirm that the books are very loosely based on multiple historical events, in particular, the English War of the Roses, also known as The Cousins' War. This war divided the royal house of Plantagenet into two dividing factions: Lancaster (the red rose) and York (the white rose). Crimson and White, any one? The war began under King Henry the VI, who was indeed mad, and lost almost all of the English lands in France among other calamities. To right this wrong, his cousin who was also a Plantagenet, Richard of York, and his eldest son seized the regency from King Henry's wife, Maragret of Anjou and was styled for the first time in British history "Protector of the Realm". She (a dead ringer for the way Cersei is betrayed in the books, btw--stupid, power hungry, impulsive, adulterous, had a bastard she tried to pass off as Henry's [most thought so, anyway]...the list goes on) was obviously not competent and had been more responsible for the loss of the lands than her husband--killed both the Lord Protector and his son. She is a mixture of mad King Henry/Aerys and Cersei and is on top for a bit, until Edward of March, the second eldest York son, avenges his dead father and brother along with the help of his brothers George Duke of Clarence and Richard (who would become Richard III). They ousted Lancaster and crowned Edward March, the white rose of York, king by right of blood and conquest. He eventually kills Marget of Anjou's (the She-Wolf of France, there's irony) son, Edward the red rose of Lancaster. His good friend Sir William Hastings helped him win his crown. Does this seem familiar? Don't get stuck on the names, rather look at the characters (or this would be exactly like the War of the Roses). Edward rules for about two decades with a rebellion or two or three, but mainly peace, but is a much better warrior than a King. Like Robert. Loves to drink and whore. Like Robert. Dies after fishing...not quite like Robert, who was hunting, but pretty close. When he dies, Sir William means to have his son crowned right away, but is betrayed by Lancaster and loses his head. Lancaster kills the York princes, and brings back the Lancaster heir and exile from across the sea, Henry Tudor, who fights Richard III and wins the crown and marries Princess Elizabeth of York, uniting the houses. Oh, and eventually all three remaining York (cough, Stark, cough) boys die. Since Bran seems transformative and can't have children, I count him among the actual dead of yore. In the show, he is "reborn" as the three eyed raven, so it seems likely to me that he will not win the throne or further the Stark line...but Sansa and Arya will, being the last of the white roses of York, with their brothers and father dead. Just as it was 600 years ago. That's pretty much how it went in the very straightforward, notes for dummies way, and I hope that you can see loosely the same themes in ASoIaF. It is very obviously very different but look into the framework and the themes carry. Now, what I want to do next is predict the ending of the books using just a few facts that are left out. Obviously, the plot differs on many points but there is the overall account of actions to be taken into account. Lancaster on top, York on top, York almost destroyed, Lancaster on bottom, York is left with only girl progeny, and Lancaster wins and marries the York princess. Work out for yourself who could have been who, no matter what their last names were and ignore the white walkers and the battle of the dawn for a bit. Now for the interesting bits that may tell us what WILL happen: Elizabeth of York was in love with her uncle,King Richard III and they were to wed after the battle against Henry Tudor, but obviously the opposite happened. However, this gives some credence to the theory that Daenarys and Jon Snow could wed, especially if you see her as the conquerer coming back home from across the sea, like Henry Tudor (who came from Wales originally, where the sigil is a red dragon). Yes, that mixes up people but not events. So we have two historical precedences that can be fulfilled at once: niece and uncle incest and the conquerer ending the struggle between the house. Margaret of Anjou was destroyed, along with her son and husband, long before this, btw, suggesting that Cersei/Margaret (who is already losing all her children anyway) effectively ends the Lancastrian/Lannister line. We do have one more heir though, Henry Tudor, who would only have inherited crawling over five or six graves and is exiled across the sea...and many have died so far for the Throne. So now even though Daenerys is a Targaryen and not a Lannister, the similarities are very compelling that she will conquer and bring peace by uniting with Jon Snow who turns out to also be a Targaryen so is in fact, royalty, but raised a Stark, so a white rose, like the white rose of York Princess Elizabeth. His last name is Snow, and he is called the white wolf, and as they keep saying--he's prettier than Tormund's daughters, etc. Gender has nothing to do with it if you can stick to the colors/sigils/events. Then we have Young Griiff, the Mummer's Dragon. Mummer=actor=Varys. He is an impostor. Why am I sure? Well, we only have like fifteen episodes left on the show and we have no connection to him. Not in Dorne, where they have scrapped Arianne and Quentyn and most everything, not with Tyrion, not with Illyrio, nothing. On the show, Varys is much more open and if he had this up his sleeve at the very least Tyrion would suspect it. We also in the books and in the show have Maester Aemon saying that Daenerys is alone in the world and that is terrible thing of a Targaryen. Royal rules of birth (just as in the show they have the bedding ceremony, which was in fact used to make sure a royal match or high match was consummated) made the queen's labor a court event, so they can see the baby delivered and NOT switched. Also, how could they find another Targaryen look-a like-in King's Landing in the first place to switch him with? The mother would have stood out. Or I may be missing something. It's hard to care for a character that I don't believe in. Now, he could show up next season, and I know the dragon must have three heads but I don't know who they will be; but even then I believe he would be a pretender because after the conclusion of the wars, two very persuasive pretenders came forth to try to re-seize the crown from Henry Tudor. Neither of them have been acknowledged by historians as to having some real claim and neither won the crown. It just didn't happen in any way shape or form, whilst everything else pretty much an amalgamation of what did happen, just with a few name changes/plot twists and no white walkers. Note: This is in no way comprehensive!! I am only speaking of the narrowest part of the narrative: who will win the Iron Throne and what the outcome would be if GRRM still sticks to his framework. I also believe that this proves that Daenerys is the Prince Who Was Promised because historically, Henry Tudor fits that title much better than Jon Snow. Henry Tudor was a prince, sort of, and we know that the word was not gender-specific in the prophesy. I also want to restate that if Young Griff was important, we would have seen it in some way on screen by now. I guess we'll know in July. I want your thoughts, good people, Does this make sense to anyone but me? Can you winkle out any other predictions I could have missed? It's a huge topic, so I know I must of missed something. Point it out!