Hajk1984

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About Hajk1984

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  1. AA may be a red herring. But I doubt it is so, especially if we accept the Azor Ahai=PtwP equivalence (which I sort of assumed). The particular prophecy has been emphasized far too much, I think, for that to be the case. That would feel like bad storytelling at this juncture. Even the show emphasizes this prophecy repeatedly (even though it coud have spoken of others, e.g. the possibility that the Stallion that mounts the World may be Dany etc. But it is the PtwP prophecy that comes up again and again. I don't know that AA has to physically fight the NK and kill him. All he has to do is beat him back. If this can be done then killing him may not be necessary. The NK may turn out to be impossible to kill, only beat back for a few thousand years until he returns again. There is no clear indication of what, if anything could kill the NK. The Children of the Forest don't even seem to know what could do it, and they are the ones who created him. And yes, Dany does seem to check more boxes than anyone (Aemon thought the dragons were definitive proof). The main argument against her seems to be that she is too obvious. But I think putting Jon at the Wall from the start has made her less obvious. It seems to be extremely subtle. So subtle, in fact, that I cannot see it. That Azor Ahai used his wife to forge it is a legend particular to the followers of the Lord of Light. However, the far more general memory shared by many different cultures (as in AWOIF) is the following: How long the darkness endured no man can say, but all agree that it was only when a great warrior—known variously as Hyrkoon the Hero, Azor Ahai, Yin Tar, Neferion, and Eldric Shadowchaser—arose to give courage to the race of men and lead the virtuous into battle with his blazing sword Lightbringer that the darkness was put to rout, and light and love returned once more to the world. Anyhow, it doesn't mean that the very same has to be done to forge it again. Especially if the old one is still around. Thoros of Myr says that it will have to be reforged in one of the histories and lore vids. But if this is a metaphor for dragons etc. then Dany has already done it with Drogo, hasn't she?
  2. Okay, hear me out on this. I am not sure of this theory by a mile. However it is starting to make some sense to me. Here goes: Despite the fact that Dany crosses so many of the PtwP requirements, she is often dismissed from this role. One of the most common arguments is that this would be too obvious. All the things that make her Azor Ahai were already fulfilled by the end of Book 1. She is put into the role even before the prophesy itself first appears. Aemon literally calls her TPtwP because her dragons prove it and so on. And yet, despite all this, the reality is that we do not find her the obvious candidate. Why is that? Because another main character who has been put on the Wall and also seems to fulfill many of the requirements has spent the entire season focused on the threat from beyond the Wall. This has been effective enough, IMHO to no longer leave her the obvious candidate. In fact, from my impression, most of the fandom wants this prophecy to be true of Jon anyhow. That, however, is exactly why Dany is not too obvious despite all the obvious fulfilments of the prophecy. What makes me believe this further are some of the following: The show has tended to emphasize the supernatural and miraculous aspects of Dany's arc (in fact made her fire-proof, giving her even more powers than the books), while de-emphasizing Jon's (apart from his resurrection, which was also not due to himself and shared with another character, i.e. Berric), like his warging ability etc. Dany has now twice pulled out mighty weapons from the fire: 1) Dragons; and 2) The Dothraki army. The way the show has set it up, the one who is currently in the main position to lead this war with immense resources is actually Dany, not Jon. Azor Ahai is supposed to be the champion of Fire. The thing that first lead me to this view is a different reading of Dany's character than what is common (at least for me). I have argued before that although D&D have peppered her narrative with many 20th/21st century feminist sounding narratives, or words that seem to indicate a medieval idea of "Girl Power" or what not, any of this will actually be quite anachronistic. I certainly don't think it would be the way GRRM would be going. D&D are not above using spectacle and badasserry to get ratings and "Wow" moments. But the larger narrative has to be kept in mind as well. With this in mind, I am lead to what I feel is one of the more problematic parts of her story: Dany's whole deal with the Dothraki. Other than allowing the badass nature of the coup to make us ignore what happened, it is not exactly the high point of her arc. What she essentially does is kill the entire Dothraki leadership in a horrendous way and walks out and the Dothraki all bow down to her. Why? Because she is "strong"? Is she? Yes she can survive fire, but she can't hold her own against a single Dothraki Bloodrider in noral combat. So they can still kill her in a regular way without issue. She can hardly do what Drogo did to enforce his authority. But the Dothraki at this juncture think that this is some sort of great sign from on high. Some sort of religious or divine sign that she is to be followed without question. On the face of it, what happens next seems even more problematic: Dany exploits this false view of theirs (as far as she knows), and turns them into an army of conquest for her Westerosi ambitions. She doesn't stay back and try to improve Dothraki society and culture. She doesn't try to civilize them. They don't get the same sort of consideration as the freed slaves. Instead she uses their belief in "strength" etc. or their view of her as some sort of goddess to pull them out of the Dothraki sea where they have lived for centuries, put them on boats which they hate, and use them (or at least intends to) as fodder for her Westerosi wars of conquest. If this doesn't strike you as problematic, imagine someone doing it today. Suppose someone were to find a primitive tribe with customs we don't like, do something fantastic (e.g. fly an airplane over their heads) to convince them that the person doing it was some sort of goddess, and then made them serve them to construct buildings etc. (far less dangerous than war). I doubt this would be acceptable to most people because of the badass nature of the plane flying over them, or because according to their beliefs they were performing an honorable duty of working for their new goddess. But I seriously do not believe D&D intend to make Dany villainous in any way. Is there a way out of this? There is an obvious one: That Dany is actually convinced that putting her on the Iron Throne is something of such cosmic significance that helping her do that actually does give the Dothraki and those who serve her a "greater purpose", or a "greater destiny." That she actually is making their lives better by giving them the chance to fight for this great and worthy cause. She is "no ordinary woman." Her "dreams come true." She gets visions. She is told to remember who she is. Miracles happen about her. Why? I must be due to her destiny as the destined monarch. Now this may seem extremely, mind-blowingly entitled to us. Hard to believe that anyone might actually think this. Yet I think it is actually consistent with Dany's entire arc and what she has been saying all along, even her speech about "faith in herself" and being "born to rule the seven kingdoms" and so on. And everything she has done with this belief seems to give her one success after another. The problem with this, however, is that this cause is really not that amazing a cause. Dany, still retaining so much of Viserys' training might see it as the highest cause imaginable, but hardly any reader will. There is such a cause, however: Saving the world. This has not really been her cause (although she has tried to play savior in smaller contexts). But this cause is big enough to actually think like this if she indeed were the chosen savior. That may well be the greatest twist of the series. The character focused on the throne is the savior, while the character obsessed with saving the world is the future king. And so much of it was obvious and in plain sight from the beginning.
  3. I think the reason was very obvious. Royce didn't trust a Targaryen to not use this as a trap for Jon. He thought she'd trap him or possibly kill him as history showed. It gave more context for Jon's statements the following episode about being a "Northern fool" who didn't listen. Of course Davos, who probably realizes that Stannis may have executed Jon by now for his unwillingness to bend the knee thinks things have gone much better.
  4. We only have one scene in which Sansa tells him that he is the Lord of Winterfell now (as the last trueborn son) to which Bran says that he can't be lord of anything etc. (btw, not a good idea to oust Jon while he's away negotiating Sansa, it weakens his hand considerably, at least let him return). I suspect Sansa may have expected him to legitimize himself as a Stark sooner or later. At that juncture she thought he was the only brother left to her and perhaps the only way to continue the Stark name. If that were to happen, then in the normal course of things he would be expected to find Sansa a good match somewhere and she would become the lady of that place (with her children inheriting from there). AFAIK she would inherit everything owned by the Boltons already so that makes her an even bigger catch. Sansa is not entirely pleased with Jon's election, but it creates a conflict for her. It has advantages as well as disadvantages. On the one hand it seems like the best hope for a long-term Stark restoration in the North . On the other she may not like being passed over.
  5. One possible twist would be the "Death itself will bend the knee" part of the Azor Ahai prophecy. Could the Army of the dead and the Night's King actually end up bending the knee? That would be a twist.
  6. Hmm... The typo that was promised I suppose my issue is that I'm not feeling that they have the 50% chance of winning. It feels like each Dothraki should easily be able to take down many wights. And with numerical parity, their standard tactic of overwhelming the living with too many numbers will not work. And then the living have advantage like flaming or dragonglass tipped arrows (and the Dothraki are great archers), Pitch, Wildfire etc. It seems like the dead will lose more wights than people they would manage to kill at even Northern locations. This would make their nos. go down in time, not up, even if the NK raised more soldiers.
  7. I really don't hope that. I want the AotD to live up to its reputation as an unstoppable apocalyptic force that deserves so much build-up. I want it to be so that people in Volantis or Assahi have any reason to care about this threat. This is true. Jon and co., have certainly made fighting them possible (it seems) by all the R&D they have carried out over the past several seasons. Samwell Tarly will also be one of the great heroes of this conflict. My issue is that with these weapons in place, the AotD starts looking manageable. At least if they give humans numerical parity and the Dotraki are good fighters. The current wights also seem less impressive than early seasons.
  8. I'm still underwhelmed by the AoTD unless there are some other clever tricks up the NK's sleeve. The living have numerical parity with them. Killing a walker can take many down at once. The dragons can burn Wights. Humans can use Dragonglass weapons. I'm not sure on Daenerys' Dothraki numbers of course, but if she fulfils the Stallion that Mounts the World prophecy (about a Khal of Khals who will unite the Dothraki), which goes: “As swift as the wind he rides, and behind him his khalasar covers the earth, men without number, with arakhs shining in their hands like blades of razor glass. Fierce as a storm this prince shall be. His enemies will tremble before him, and their wives will weep tears of blood and rend their flesh in grief. The bells in his hair will sing his coming, and the milk men in the stone tents will fear his name…the prince is riding, and he shall be the stallion who mounts the world.” I wonder if "razor glass"=dragonglass. If so, then I still don't find it very impressive. The NK needs massive numbers compared to humans. Given their recent showings, the AoTD have an advantage only with overwhelming numbers against properly armed opposition.
  9. I don't know. That remains to be seen. So far Dragonglass seems to be effective due to magic not due to it being a lethal weapon. Is Undead Viserion an ice-breather? All I saw was blue fire. That could also be very hot fire. I think we need to wait to know whether a Wight-Dragon is an Ice dragon.
  10. This final para is essentially saying what I think needs to be done here. Forget the math. All we know is that Dany has the strongest army, although somehow the army of the dead is still an apocalyptic threat. And the fact that if the NK doesn't have any new tricks then he should be screwed is exactly what I think. At Hardhome they didn't have the needed weapons. But the most recent showing of the AotD have not been impressive. Given how massive this event is supposed to be (the stuff of prophecy etc.) It would be a let down for me if it was contained to the North in the end. I would like impossible odds (like seas freezing, both Essos and Westeros in threat, NK raising skeletons and corpses from thousands of years ago and so on). I mean the last time this happened the stories are found everywhere and formed the basis of prophecies and religions. It feels like it ought to be something enormous. But I can expect a mostly Northern affair where even Winterfell isn't destroyed and there are just some badass or scary cinematic moments.
  11. I think the simplest here is that D&D needed certain pieces in place so they put them there. But there is so much ambiguity at this point that what happens in season 8 (in terms of threat, numbers etc.) is something they can easily play around with. Their remaining forces would not be much if Tyrion's initial estimate of 10,000 was correct (in fact it isn't clear why it matters at all given that even Royce in the North controls 2,000 soldiers. Seems like a minor number for the crown, and rather small for the Lannister army. But I will interpret the numbers as flexible. They wanted to get Dany and her forces (whatever numbers they want to give them) up in the North and Cersei and the Golden Company in the South to set up two conflicts, so that is what they accomplished.
  12. The dead only increase their number with those they kill. In which case I think each Dothraki and Unsullied should be able to take a few before falling. Of course if the NK can start raising the dead from centuries ago who have been buried but not burned then that may give him the sort of massive numerical advantage he needs. I just feel he needs a bigger force. Millions seems more appropriate. I don't think there is such a serious threat to the human race based on what they've shown. Cersei knows they have dragons that can burn wights by the thousands and parity in numbers. So numbers parity and superior WMDs. I don't know if immorality would apply here. Certainly Jaime's reaction seems overblown.
  13. Yeah, but the BS idea didn't make sense as Jaime etc. took it seriously when that happened and even Dany and Jon seemed to have the look one would expect if it was something momentous. And Lannister forces in the RL etc. are already banners that have been called. They are stationed at that place for now. That was one of the reasons I asked which lands are controlled by which party. Because it sounded like she was issuing a call for something major when she did that, not something that would only raise a few thousand forces. That could make sense if it was a royal command to all the lords who has pledged themselves to the Iron Throne to call their banners. In which case it would make much sense and seem like a huge contribution depending on which lands the Iron Throne currently controlled.
  14. Is it even immoral? One country is clearly at war with mine and now they (as the North is now part of Dany's dominion) are facing a roughly equal enemy on their other border. What motivation do I really have (even morally) to go and defend their country when they won't even guarantee me a peace and security of my borders following this battle? The chances for the dead are not looking that great if the living have parity in numbers as well as intelligence (that the dead have shown very little evidence of), and the weaponry to fight them. At this rate I wouldn't be surprised if the NK is defeated by 8x02 or 8x03 (Jon may have a badass fight scene and deliver a final blow to the NK). There are arrows and flaming arrow etc too. And the Dothraki use daggers as well. Remember the daggers Drogo was carrying (and dropped when fighting that dude for Dany's honor). One can also make spears with such tips for the Unsullied and so on. Given their prowess, if they really have equal numbers with the dead, I don't see them being overwhelmed by the AotD. For that I'd need the dead to have a huge numerical advantage.
  15. And yet in 7x07 Cersei (pretend) issues a command to "call the banners, all of them", so apparently the Lannisters haven't even bothered to do that yet. Back in season 1 that was one of the first steps that Robb took when going to war.