Garett Hornwood

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About Garett Hornwood

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    Landed Knight
  • Birthday October 20

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    http://towearacrown.blogspot.com

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    Collegedale, TN

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  1. April Reads: What, fool, are you reading?!?

    Well after not posting anything for the first half of the month, I figured I should give an account of my reading so far this month. I'm still working on The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume III (Modern Library edition that covers Chapters 49-71) by Edward Gibbon, which I started on around March 30. I'm roughly halfway through this book (in Chapter 59) and am continuing to enjoy Gibbon's all encompassing style of writing history. While Gibbon is my primary read, I do some exclusive home reading every day. I started The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson (a Barnes & Noble Classics publication) in mid-March and finished it yesterday, when I purchased it I thought it was the entirety of Dickinson's work but later learn that it's not even close. But it's a good "sampler" of her work so it was time well spent. Up next will be Leaves of Grass (The First and "Death-Bed" Editions) by Walt Whitman, which is another Barnes & Noble Classics publication). On Fridays-Saturdays, I read some short "tame"/g-rated or strictly religious books. So if you're not interested then skip the next paragraph... So far I've read Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg (I attended and graduated middle & high school with his granddaughter), in which Baerg retells events of ten years of his early life growing up Canadian prairie before moving to British Columbia. Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan, I had this book since I attended Dr. Samaan's class in college about 17 years ago and while I didn't read it for the class I hung on to it. Overall it's a book about how Jews, Muslims, and Christians have more in common than people realize, Samaan should know because he was born and raised in Syria as Christian (I'm talking the late 50s through early 70s) before doing missionary work around the world then later entering academia. The book is around 25 years old and so the emphasis Samaan has is more towards Christian-Jewish relations than Christian-Muslim relations that have taken, even with that it was an interesting read. I'm going to be finishing The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien, this is another religious book which was published in 1999 and discusses sense of Christian and secular "anticipation" of doomsday for the upcoming year 2000. While obviously dated, Paulien essentially shows that the anticipation of calendar changes is a phenomenon that is a human invention built up over centuries and that Christians need not worry about artificial dates. Last year I started rereading Cahill's Hinges of History series, my reading updates might be among those recs you referenced. As an avid history reader, I graduated college with a B.A. in History, I'm finding that while they are enjoyable and sometimes thought-provoking I always come away wanting just a tad more. Originally Cahill wasn't planning on writing a series, but the huge popularity of Irish resulted in his publisher and he brainstorming resulting in Hinges of History. Cahill admits that Irish chronologically falls between the fourth (the Greeks) and the fifth (the high Middle Ages). If you're ever interested in my reviews of the books as I reread them, they're on my blog (link below) I probably do need to read Keegan sometime, but when I was reading material on WWI back in 2014 I wanted an overall view of the actual combat of the war. Peter Hart's The Great War: A Combat History focuses on the military history (timeline of battles, strategies and tactics) of the war in all theaters--I don't recall how many maps the book had though--and is a fantastic read if you're interested in a book that focuses on military over political & social aspects that other books tend to emphasis (not that there's anything wrong with that approach, but I always felt I didn't understand what happened on the battlefield unlike WWII or the U.S. Civil War or the Napoleonic Wars or the American Revolutionary War).
  2. 2017 Reading Self-Challenge

    My 2017 40 Book Challenge (January Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) This past month I read the most books I've ever read, of course it helps when half the books are less than 200 pages. Anyway to the statistics: 16/40 overall and 15/30 first time reads.
  3. March Reading 2017

    I finished off The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents and enjoyed. I read Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt, which was about the return of the Vaudois religious group returning from exile to their home against the forces Louis XIV's France during the beginning of the Nine Years' War, unfortunately the author couldn't decide between nonfiction and historical fiction in his writing style. And I read Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter by Thomas Cahill, it was a good book for a general reader of history about how the Greeks influenced Western Civilization but if you're more than a general reader you're left wanting something more. I've started The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume III by Edward Gibbon I picked up Nixonland when it was published back in 2008, afterwards I grabbed Perlstein's Before the Storm and when it was published The Invisible Bridge which are the first and third book in his series.
  4. March Reading 2017

    Given that fantasy is classified as a subgenre under the Speculative Fiction umbrella, I don't understand the argument but whatever. As for your opinion on the book, you didn't like it and I did, we're both enjoyed to our opinions. --- I finished The Night Circus this past Sunday, as I said above I did enjoy it but I'm going to have to reread it because I'm pretty sure I missed some nuanced details that would have added to my enjoyment. I've also read Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic, this is a print version of a webcomic of the same name on DeviantArt. Since I enjoy the webcomic, I absolutely loved this. And on Friday/Saturday I read Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon, a short biography of early/mid-19th century American preach William Miller and a history leading up to the Great Disappointment. Given it's short length it is more an introduction both of the man and the Millerite movement as a whole, there are other books that go more in-depth on both. Currently I'm reading The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents as part of my read-through of Discworld, I haven't read Pratchett since December and loved finally being back on the Disc. I'll be finished by tomorrow, but already I sorta disappointed that this is basically a "one-off" book and not the first of a series of it's own. Through apparently it has some minor connection to the "Death" series, but I haven't come across the evidence to support that. Then after Maurice, I'll be doing my first re-read of the year with Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill, the fourth of his Hinges of History series.
  5. March Reading 2017

    I didn't mean to take two weeks between the OP and this one, but here's what I've done so far this month... I first completed Lighter of Gospel Fires, a short young adult biography of a 19th century preacher. Next I finally completed The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Volume II), it was very good but I still haven't figured out why it took me so long to finish it. Last weekend I read A Bold One for God, a short young adult biography of Scottish Reformer John Knox which was not very good. And yesterday I completed Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth, a book looking at the bloody events that the varnish and gloss of popular history has hidden about the Revolutionary period in the United States. Today I started The Night Circus, this is actually my first full fantasy book of the year. While I love history, it's refreshing to step away for a while.
  6. Ways to introduce Aegon earlier into the story.

    Aegon can make a cameo appearance in AGOT Daenerys III as she remembers Viserys insisting on taking a boat, Shy Maid, across the Rhoyne or one of it's tributaries while the rest of the khalasar fords the river somewhere (they have to get from Pentos to the Dothraki Sea somehow). Dany remembers the young blue haired boy and his father, but no interaction between the two or anything. Just a random encounter that no one realizes is important until ADWD.
  7. March Reading 2017

    I'm around 150 pages left in The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume II by Edward Gibbon. I've been enjoying it, however I can't believe I'm still reading it since it didn't take me this long to reading Volume I. So what are you continuing or starting this month?
  8. 2017 Reading Self-Challenge

    My 2017 40 Book Challenge (January Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Well I might have read as many books in February as in January, however it was a frustrating month because the book I've been reading almost the entire month isn't on this list. Anyway to the statistics: 6/40 overall and 6/30 first time reads.
  9. February Reading 2017

    Last weekend (Friday more than Saturday), I read In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead, it short young adult book about a nine month period in Armistead's life in which he joined his father digging for a lost gold mine. At only 96 pages, it was really short and I really wish it had been more but Armistead was writing this almost 40 years after it happened and he couldn't agree with his father on some stories he would have liked to included. I'm still plugging away at The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Volume II), no idea about why it's taking me longer than Volume I but it's getting pretty depressing because I'm enjoying it. With around 150 pages left, I will definitely finish early in March but still I thought I would have gotten it finished.
  10. February Reading 2017

    I finished The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White on Monday, since it's taking me a lot of time to get through The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Volume II) I'm going to be reading that essentially exclusively at both work and home until I complete it.
  11. February Reading 2017

    Finished Dangerous Women 1 yesterday, I found it a mix bag overall but I did like The Princess and the Queen which was the reason I purchased the book in the first place. Given that I'm ardent history reader, the whole "history" aspect was exactly up my alley. I've started The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume II by Edward Gibbon, which actually covers books 3 & 4 from his original work.
  12. February Reading 2017

    Surprised that there wasn't already a thread, but here it is and with that... I've started reading Dangerous Women 1, the first of three paperback editions of the anthology edited by GRRM and Dozois. Since 1 has "The Princess and the Queen" it's the one I purchased since I was only interested in ASOIAF material. I'm still working my way through The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White as my home read. So what are you reading this month?
  13. January Reading 2017

    Last night (Jan. 31) I finished Centuries of Change by Ian Mortimer. I thought it was a very good book, thought-provoking yet very readable for a general audience as well. Since it's a new month I'll post on the February thread about what I've started reading.
  14. 2017 Reading Self-Challenge

    My 2017 40 Book Challenge (January Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Change by Ian Mortimer
  15. January Reading 2017

    I finished two books today, the first was Don Quixote and I enjoyed the central narrative very much, stuff not directly related to DQ and Sancho was somewhat annoying. The second was The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White. Tomorrow I'm starting Centuries of Change by Ian Mortimer which was a Christmas gift from my aunt, who had no idea that I've been wanting to read one of Mortimer's biographies of English monarchs for year so anything by him to get a sense of his writing style is welcome. While Mortimer is my primary read, my home read is The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White which is the last of her Conflict of the Ages series that I've been reading for the last few months.