Garett Hornwood

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About Garett Hornwood

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    Landed Knight
  • Birthday October 20

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    http://towearacrown.blogspot.com

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    Collegedale, TN

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  1. Last Friday I finally finished Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems. I'm going to be completely honest there were some great pieces--many of which were the usual suspects and some which were surprises--but a lot of the time it was a slog to read hoping from something different but always getting premature burial or a young woman dying or a criminal having gotten away with it until they confess of their own free will. After having the book on my shelf for three years, I wish I had purchased a more selected collection. Yesterday I finished Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America's Universities by Daniel Golden. Golden is an investigative journalist and has been writing about how both American and foreign intelligence agencies are using higher education in the global spy game. It was a fascinating read, but already it's "current affairs"-vibe is waning after the election of and reaction to Trump last November, which is interesting because the book will be officially be published in October but I received an ARC via LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program. Also yesterday I started Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett as part of my read-through of Discworld. I'm nearly 40% through the book and am enjoying it, I'll say that I saw one "revelation" coming but am more interested in a little snippet occurring every so often and how that'll play into the narrative than anything Vimes and company are doing currently.
  2. I'm stilling reading Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems from July, I only have Poe's only novel to read and the book is finally over.
  3. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (June Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill This past month I completed just two books (thanks complete Edgar Allan Poe) putting my total for the year overall at 34/40 overall and 30/30 first time reads, thus achieving one of my 2017 goals.
  4. Personally I wouldn't call any of these books chorus of hosannas, I'm religious (weekly church attendance in addition to being a deacon) and I've come to the conclusion that Cahill is a nominal Christian, who picks and chooses what he wants to believe. Though this is obviously my opinion, I'm basing it on life-long reading of very religious material from "tame" inspirational books to conservative stuff that makes me question what Bible the author is looking at or if they decided to cutout all the stuff that appears to "liberal" (basically 180-degree opposite of Cahill). But again that's from my perspective. As for the Enlightenment and Modernism, my guess is that the Enlightenment will be Volume VII as Cahill's last three volumes are under the subsection of "Making of the Modern World". Cahill originally didn't plan to write a 7 book series, after How the Irish Saved Civilization just blew up on the bestseller list his publisher wanted him to follow it up and that's how Hinges came about. He even admits that the series should properly go like this Jews-->Jesus-->Greeks-->Irish-->Middle Ages-->Heretics/Heroes-->Volume VII.
  5. Well I have good and bad news, mostly bad, for further books in the series. Volume IV, Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, focuses mostly on Greco-Roman thought so the religiosity is minimal. However Volumes V and VI will have it particularly because they focus on the High Middle Ages and the Renaissance/Reformation era; yet there is going to be a tension between the Greco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian traditions as well as a growing focus on art. If I were to guess, and this is just a pure guess, Volume VII will be how the West turned into a more secular society. That being said, I finished Heretics and Heroes on Monday and while I loved the information Cahill was giving I would have enjoyed it if his personal opinions did not bleed into the text which somewhat undercut his writing. A few days afterwards, I'm wondering if I noticed more of Cahill in the text because I read two of his books back-to-back. Yesterday I started Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems, the book starts off with his poems over the first ~110 pages of the 1020 page book.
  6. I finished Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill on Monday, I forgot a lot about the book from my first read of years back but then again it was only an "okay" book overall given how he undercut some of his own arguments. I've started Cahill's Heretics and Heroes which is the sixth book of the Hinges of History and the only one I hadn't read before. This one is focused on the "gift givers" of the Renaissance and the Reformation that shaped Western society.
  7. I'm continuing my reread of Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill.
  8. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (June Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett This past month I completed five books putting my total for the year overall at 32/40 overall and 29/30 first time reads.
  9. Well I finished The Wee Free Men today at lunch and really enjoyed it, I'm looking forward to the other books featuring Tiffany especially since she'll be getting older along the way. I also finished Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell over the weekend, it's about the beginnings and early history of the Seventh-day Adventist church. I'm currently rereading Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill, this is the fifth book of his Hinges of History series. I won't finish it by the end of the month so unless I get quoted this will be my last post for this particular thread.
  10. Finished The Iliad/The Odyssey today, well the latter as the former I finished on Sunday, and really enjoyed both and frankly, but unsurprisingly, found them way different from adaptations I've seen in movies or on tv...which made them even better. I've started reading The Wee Free Men by Pratchett today as part of my read through of Discworld.
  11. Finished Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck and really enjoyed it. I've started The Iliad/The Odyssey by Homer.
  12. I started the month with about 20% left to read in Rogues, the short story collection edited by Martin and Gardner R. Dozois. I finished the book earlier today and overall the stories were above average with a few stinkers and several great stories. My next read will be Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck.
  13. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (May Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore This past month I read just four books, which after my huge months of March (10) and April (7) is actually back to my norm. Anyway to the statistics: 27/40 overall and 24/30 first time reads.
  14. I finished The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, which is omnibus collection of the first five novels plus a short story. Overall I found everything so-so in both humor and in each story. I'm going to have to check out the radio serial to see if that is funnier and just better than the book. Next I read Night Watch by Terry Pratchett as part of my read through of the Discworld series. I really enjoyed this book, as I've done of basically all the Watch books, and don't know what I can add to that. I'm currently reading the GRRMartin edited Rogues and so far have found almost all the stories very good, but I still have a long way to go. The following books are more religious oriented, so this is your warning... I reread Sabbath Roots: The African Connection by Charles E. Bradford and read The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore as part of my "tame" readings on Friday & Saturdays. The first book is a look at evidence of Sabbath-keeping on the African continent before the arrival European Christian missionaries and is mostly an introduction to the whole decision. The second book is a look at Seventh-day Adventist eschatology written in the early 1990s as can be determined the use of 'the new world order' in the title, the dated references to "current events" are the biggest flaw of the book but it's also a general read for both Adventist and non-Adventist audiences.
  15. Surprised this thread hasn't been started yet, but here we go. I'm a quarter of the way through The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide of the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. I found The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy only so-so, intriguing and a little funny. However before I find myself in deep water, I'm finding Restaurant at the End of the Universe better and funnier. What are you reading?