Garett Hornwood

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About Garett Hornwood

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    Landed Knight
  • Birthday October 20

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    http://towearacrown.blogspot.com

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    Collegedale, TN

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  1. Okay, there's what I've been reading the first two weeks of the month. I started the month by continuing to read Going Postal, I enjoyed it but you could tell it wasn't up to Pratchett's prime. I read Renegade: Martin Luther, the Graphic Biography which was alright, but the artwork was so-so at best and took away from the biographical part of the book. Next I finished William Shakespeare's The Force Doth Awaken by Ian Doescher, this was a fantastic adaptation of the film into the prose and theater of the Elizabeth era just like Doescher's previous six books. Finally Thursday I finished The Stairway to Heaven by Zecharia Sitchin, this is the second book of his series on this ancient aliens theory and while interesting he was a bit repetitive in his information and not as well written as the first book. I started reading The Division of Christendom by Hans J. Hillerbrand.
  2. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (September Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems Spy Schools by Daniel Golden Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Daniel and the Revelation by Uriah Smith Christianity by Roland H. Bainton The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett Op-Center by Jeff Rovin (reread) Republic by Plato translated by Robin Waterfield Gilgamesh translated by Stephen Mitchell 500 Years of Protest and Liberty by Nicholas Patrick Miller This past month I completed eight books putting my total for the year overall at 46/40 overall and 40/30 first time reads. Now that I've completed both my overall and first reads challenges, I'm going to be all over the place on my TBR list for the next three months instead of the reading list I can up with at the beginning of the year.
  3. On Tuesday I finished (The) Republic by Plato as translated by Robin Waterfield and that it was interesting as philosophy but isn't much of a political theory because well there are a lot of holes if it was. Yesterday and today, I read Gilgamesh: A New English Version translated by Stephen Mitchell and enjoyed it. I've started Going Postal as part of my read through of Discworld.
  4. Tuesday I finished my reread of Op-Center by Jeff Rovin, it was a good action-thriller however the characters, especially the women, were meh. Given that I was a teenager when I first read the book, it isn't surprising that I didn't notice them before. Hopefully character development improves in other books, but I'm not confident. I've started reading (The) Republic by Plato, no specific reason except to have read it as well as other philosophical & political theory works from across the millennia.
  5. On Thursday night I finished A Hat Full of Sky, I enjoyed the interaction between Tiffany and Granny as well as a young (smart) witch learning the craft. Friday I started rereading Op-Center (aka Tom Clancy's Op-Center) by Jeff Rovin, from 1995-2003 this was one of the two book series--the other was another "Tom Clancy" series entitled Power Plays--that I bought as soon as the books came out and read as fast as possible. The original run went until 2005, but the last two books while I did purchase them I just did get into reading. The series was "rebooted" in 2014 and while I've purchased the books I haven't read them because I still hadn't read those last two books from the original series. So I'm going to start rereading the series every eight book--if everything goes to plan (it won't)--until I get through the both the original and the reboot.
  6. I've been finishing books in rapid succession since the start of the month so here's a rundown: Friday: I finished Daniel and the Revelation by Uriah Smith, a religious book I've been reading on the weekends since the end of June. Saturday: I finished Christianity by Roland H. Bainton, this was a general survey of Christianity's 2000 year history in a little under 400 pages which after the fall of the Western Roman Empire kept the focus on Western Europe obviously in build up to the Reformation. Sunday-Monday: I read The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela, a short novel set in the still on-going (at the time of publication) of the Mexican Revolution. Though only ~160 pages, it perfectly brings out the confusion that conflict was known for. I'm currently over halfway through A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett as part of my read through of Discworld, I'm enjoying following Tiffany Aching again as well as the chaos that is the Wee Free Men.
  7. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (August Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems Spy Schools by Daniel Golden Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) This past month I completed four books putting my total for the year overall at 38/40 overall and 33/30 first time reads. This weekend I'll be officially completely my personal year challenge when I finish my primary book and my home read. It'll be the earliest that I've ever officially completed a challenge.
  8. On Friday finished my reread of The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin, the science arguments was some what cringe-worthy and argumentative transitions weren't well written. However when he examined Sumerian myths and histories, or at least his translations and interpretations of them, it was a better read. Overall, what you expect from a nearly 40 year old book laying out a the "ancient astronaut' theory. On Sunday began reading Christianity by Roland H. Bainton. This book is a part of the American Heritage Library, a series of general history books on different subjects published in the middle-late 80s. It was one of my textbooks for Church History, but I only took the 2nd semester of the class so anything before the Reformation I never read not that I remember anything from the textbooks I read for a class 15+ years ago...though I do remember the books I read for the book reports for the class. Honestly, the lectures that this particular professor gave were the reason you took his classes.
  9. Yeah, I knew it was coming. I didn't know if Monstrous Regiment was the start or not, but except with Aching I'm nervous about what I'll be picking up from the shelf.
  10. Both about recruiting (of both students and professors) by American and foreign intelligence and about everything else under the sun that both sides do when it involves academia. It seems you know too much... === I was on vacation this last week, completed Monstrous Regiment on Monday and thought it was really good though certain "surprises" weren't really surprising by the time they happened in the book because you figured they'd happen. I enjoyed it, but now I realize I've only got 10 books left in the Discworld series to go. For the rest of my vacation I started catching up on one of my exclusive "home" read Leaves of Grass: First and "Death-Bed" Editions by Walt Whitman, primarily the First Edition. Heading back to work tomorrow and I'll be starting a reread of the "ancient alien" classic The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin.
  11. Last Friday I finally finished Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems. I'm going to be completely honest there were some great pieces--many of which were the usual suspects and some which were surprises--but a lot of the time it was a slog to read hoping from something different but always getting premature burial or a young woman dying or a criminal having gotten away with it until they confess of their own free will. After having the book on my shelf for three years, I wish I had purchased a more selected collection. Yesterday I finished Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America's Universities by Daniel Golden. Golden is an investigative journalist and has been writing about how both American and foreign intelligence agencies are using higher education in the global spy game. It was a fascinating read, but already it's "current affairs"-vibe is waning after the election of and reaction to Trump last November, which is interesting because the book will be officially be published in October but I received an ARC via LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program. Also yesterday I started Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett as part of my read-through of Discworld. I'm nearly 40% through the book and am enjoying it, I'll say that I saw one "revelation" coming but am more interested in a little snippet occurring every so often and how that'll play into the narrative than anything Vimes and company are doing currently.
  12. I'm stilling reading Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems from July, I only have Poe's only novel to read and the book is finally over.
  13. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (June Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill This past month I completed just two books (thanks complete Edgar Allan Poe) putting my total for the year overall at 34/40 overall and 30/30 first time reads, thus achieving one of my 2017 goals.
  14. Personally I wouldn't call any of these books chorus of hosannas, I'm religious (weekly church attendance in addition to being a deacon) and I've come to the conclusion that Cahill is a nominal Christian, who picks and chooses what he wants to believe. Though this is obviously my opinion, I'm basing it on life-long reading of very religious material from "tame" inspirational books to conservative stuff that makes me question what Bible the author is looking at or if they decided to cutout all the stuff that appears to "liberal" (basically 180-degree opposite of Cahill). But again that's from my perspective. As for the Enlightenment and Modernism, my guess is that the Enlightenment will be Volume VII as Cahill's last three volumes are under the subsection of "Making of the Modern World". Cahill originally didn't plan to write a 7 book series, after How the Irish Saved Civilization just blew up on the bestseller list his publisher wanted him to follow it up and that's how Hinges came about. He even admits that the series should properly go like this Jews-->Jesus-->Greeks-->Irish-->Middle Ages-->Heretics/Heroes-->Volume VII.
  15. Well I have good and bad news, mostly bad, for further books in the series. Volume IV, Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea, focuses mostly on Greco-Roman thought so the religiosity is minimal. However Volumes V and VI will have it particularly because they focus on the High Middle Ages and the Renaissance/Reformation era; yet there is going to be a tension between the Greco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian traditions as well as a growing focus on art. If I were to guess, and this is just a pure guess, Volume VII will be how the West turned into a more secular society. That being said, I finished Heretics and Heroes on Monday and while I loved the information Cahill was giving I would have enjoyed it if his personal opinions did not bleed into the text which somewhat undercut his writing. A few days afterwards, I'm wondering if I noticed more of Cahill in the text because I read two of his books back-to-back. Yesterday I started Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems, the book starts off with his poems over the first ~110 pages of the 1020 page book.