Garett Hornwood

Members
  • Content count

    436
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Garett Hornwood

  • Rank
    Landed Knight
  • Birthday October 20

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://towearacrown.blogspot.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Collegedale, TN

Recent Profile Visitors

1,695 profile views
  1. I finished Making Money and frankly while I love the character of Moist von Lipwig, you can tell that Pratchett's writing was beginning to suffer because the overall plot as well as all subplots all basically meandered and eventually came together in a mishmash sorta way. I've begun rereading Mirror Image by Jeff Rovin, this is the second book on the Tom Clancy's Op-Center series.
  2. Well Beowulf did not take long, basically not counting translator Seamus Heaney's introduction it was a one-day read, but it was very good. I've started Making Money by Terry Pratchett as part of my Discworld read-through. It began rather slow, but I'm 42% into it now and Moist is beginning to do his thing. I enjoyed Moist's first book and right now I'm enjoying this one, personally I like the character and wish Terry had begun writing him earlier because the quality of writing does seem lower. This weekend I started reading the second book of Sam Campbell's Living Forest series, Too Much Salt and Pepper (they're porcupines). I'm about halfway through and will finish it next weekend.
  3. Alright a quick update on my reading so far in the month. I finished Founding Myths by Ray Raphael last Thursday, I thought it was pretty good but unfortunately Raphael liked to repeat a lot of stuff including an series of events in 1774 that he had previously written a book about so seemed to be hyping his own work...which was a tad annoying. Last weekend I read the first volume of Sam Campbell's Living Forest series, How's Inky?. It's a very short read, but nice for anyone interested in nature books. Today I finished Evita: The Real of Eva Peron by Nicholas Fraser, it was a good biography though short considering she was only 33 year old when she died. The weirdest part of her story was what happened with her body after death. I've started Beowulf. Same.
  4. I'm starting the year reading Founding Myths by Ray Raphael, it's about the myths of the American Revolutionary period and the actual history behind them. I've begun reading two books at home in at least 10 page increments, the first is continuing Leaves of Grass: First and "Death-Bed" Edition by Walt Whitman which I began last year then petered out in the fall. The second is The Rise of the West by William H. McNeill, a now 55-year old world history that was groudbreaking in historical theory and has influenced historiography since.
  5. I finished Ancient Mysteries by Rupert Furneaux last Thursday and it was alright, but it was dated (late 70s/early 80s) in its scientific evidence (obviously) and Furneaux tried to be edgy in some of his answers to the topics he covered. My last book of the year was Western Civilization to 1500 by Walther Kirchner, it was a survey of 5500 years of history in under 300 pages through about 3500 of that was covered in the first 30 pages. Basically the focus was on Europe starting with Greece (surprise) at about 500 BCE. Learned a lot of Greek and Roman history I didn't know before, especially the decline of the Republic before Caesar. But since the book was published in the early 1960s, it was dated and had some disparaging terminology for some cultures and had a mixture of historical theories (the book was meant as a study guide for students and covered several textbooks at the time; as well as for general history readers). Overall it was good and is now a handy little reference book.
  6. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (October Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems Spy Schools by Daniel Golden Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Daniel and the Revelation by Uriah Smith Christianity by Roland H. Bainton The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett Op-Center by Jeff Rovin (reread) Republic by Plato translated by Robin Waterfield Gilgamesh translated by Stephen Mitchell 500 Years of Protest and Liberty by Nicholas Patrick Miller Going Postal by Terry Pratchett Renegade: Martin Luther, The Graphic Biography by Andrea Grosso Ciponte & Dacia Palmerino William Shakespeare's The Force Doth Awaken by Ian Doescher The Stairway to Heaven by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Blood Stain Volume Three by Linda Sejic The Division of Christendom by Hans J. Hillerbrand Reformations: The Early Modern World, 1450-1650 by Carlos M.N. Eire They Came for Freedom: The Forgotten, Epic Adventure of the Pilgrims by C.J. Milbrandt Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey (reread) Romans: Salvation for "All" by George R. Knight Thud! by Terry Pratchett Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett Atlantis: The Eighth Continent by Charles Berlitz Ancient Mysteries by Rupert Furneaux Western Civilization to 1500 by Walther Kirchner This past month I finished 9 books, 8 of which were first-time reads that brought my total for the year to 62/40 overall and 54/30 first time reads. My total of 24,894 pages is my 2nd personal best (behind 2016).
  7. Finished Atlantis: The Eighth Continent yesterday, it was what it was. More useful for various archaeological and monumental structures than the author's theory on Atlantis in the mid-Atlantic. I started Ancient Mysteries by Rupert Furneaux, this is more what scientists have figured out about various ruins and locations, both well known and those not celebrated. So far it's an interesting read.
  8. Yesterday I finished Wintersmith, enjoying it very much. I started Atlantis: The Eighth Continent by Charles Berlitz yesterday. This is just a short book which basically makes claims that scientific discoveries are beginning to prove that Atlantis existed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. It was published in the mid-80s, I expect to find that the author has no idea what the author is talking about scientifically. I bought this book from a used book store probably in the late 90s or early 00s and it's just been sitting on my shelf since, so I'm going to read it and then probably sell it off. It's getting to the end of the year and I'm just looking for short books on my shelf to either read or reread through the 31st.
  9. On Thursday I finished Thud!, while it was good you could tell that the quality of Pratchett's writing was off from his best. I began reading Wintersmith on Thursday to continue my read through the Discworld series and catching up on my schedule to finish the series sometime in mid-2018.
  10. I finished The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey on Friday, it was enjoyable as I remember though know I know some of Tey bad arguments in support of Richard III as well as ignored arguments for. On Sunday I finished Romans: Salvation for "All" by George R. Knight, this a commentary on the Epistle of the same name. Only 127 pages, so I read it quickly over the weekend. On Friday after I had finished Tey, I began reading Thud! by Terry Pratchett as part of a read through of the Discworld series.
  11. Okay this last weekend I finished a short read, They Came for Freedom by Jay Milbrandt which was about the coming and survival of the Pilgrims at New Plymouth. It's was a good general history read and I learned some interesting stuff not only about the early history of the colony but also the Separatists as well. Yesterday I finished Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson, I enjoyed it better than the first book though if I were to reread The Way of Kings I'd probably like it better now than I did a few years ago. My next read will be the reread of Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time, it'll be short but with it being the end of the year I like to (re-)read short books so I don't have anything crossing over to the next year (though I will already have something like that with my so progression on a big poetry book).
  12. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (October Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems Spy Schools by Daniel Golden Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Daniel and the Revelation by Uriah Smith Christianity by Roland H. Bainton The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett Op-Center by Jeff Rovin (reread) Republic by Plato translated by Robin Waterfield Gilgamesh translated by Stephen Mitchell 500 Years of Protest and Liberty by Nicholas Patrick Miller Going Postal by Terry Pratchett Renegade: Martin Luther, The Graphic Biography by Andrea Grosso Ciponte & Dacia Palmerino William Shakespeare's The Force Doth Awaken by Ian Doescher The Stairway to Heaven by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Blood Stain Volume Three by Linda Sejic The Division of Christendom by Hans J. Hillerbrand Reformations: The Early Modern World, 1450-1650 by Carlos M.N. Eire This past month dominated by one book that brought my total for the year overall at 53/40 overall and 46/30 first time reads. I'm currently reading another long book, which I'm almost two-thirds of the way through. Unless there is some miracle (there won't be) I'll not set a record for books read like I have the last few years, but I'm still pretty happy with this year's reading.
  13. It took most of the month, but I finished Reformations: The Early Modern World, 1450-1650 by Carlos M.N. Eire. It was a very thorough look at the Reformation and it's associated reformations that affected Europe and the rest of the world, particularly those impacted by Catholic missionary work. Given that about 760 out of it's 920 pages was text, the fact that all of that was very informative and not a drag was great. I've started Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson. I was the complete opposite opinion of these two books. I really liked Fahrenheit 451 and utterly loathed Catcher in the Rye except whenever Holden gets beaten up.
  14. I'm still reading Reformations: The Early Modern World, 1450-1650 by Carlos M.N. Eire, I'm a tad more than quarter of the way through the book so I expect to take at least half the month on it.
  15. My 2017 40 Book Challenge (October Update) Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes The Acts of the Apostles by Ellen G. White Centuries of Changes by Ian Mortimer Dangerous Women 1 edited George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois The Great Controversy by Ellen G. White In Search of the Golden Rainbow by Charles Armistead Lighter of Gospel Fires by Ella M. Robinson The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 2 by Edward Gibbon A Bold One for God by Charles G. Edwards Scars of Independence by Holger Hoock Blood Stain (Volume Two) by Linda Sejic Herald of the Midnight Cry by Paul A. Gordon The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Terry Pratchett Home to Our Valleys! by Walter Utt Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea by Thomas Cahill (reread) Prairie Boy by Harry Baerg Blood Brothers by Philip Samaan The Millennium Bug by Jon Paulien (reread) The Collected Works of Emily Dickinson National Sunday Law by A. Jan Marcussen The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Vol. 3 by Edward Gibbon The New World Order by Russell Burrill The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Sabbath Roots by Charles E. Bradford (reread) Night Watch by Terry Pratchett The Antichrist and the New World Order by Marvin Moore Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin Travels with Charley: In Search of America by John Steinbeck The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer Tell It to the World by Mervyn Maxwell The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett Mysteries of the Middle Ages by Thomas Cahill (reread) Heretics and Heroes by Thomas Cahill Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems Spy Schools by Daniel Golden Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Daniel and the Revelation by Uriah Smith Christianity by Roland H. Bainton The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett Op-Center by Jeff Rovin (reread) Republic by Plato translated by Robin Waterfield Gilgamesh translated by Stephen Mitchell 500 Years of Protest and Liberty by Nicholas Patrick Miller Going Postal by Terry Pratchett Renegade: Martin Luther, The Graphic Biography by Andrea Grosso Ciponte & Dacia Palmerino William Shakespeare's The Force Doth Awaken by Ian Doescher The Stairway to Heaven by Zecharia Sitchin (reread) Blood Stain Volume Three by Linda Sejic The Division of Christendom by Hans J. Hillerbrand This past month I completed six books putting my total for the year overall at 52/40 overall and 45/30 first time reads. Now that I've completed both my overall and first reads challenges, I'm going to be all over the place on my TBR list for the next two months instead of the reading list I can up with at the beginning of the year.