WarGalley

Members
  • Content count

    3,031
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About WarGalley

  • Rank
    Council Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Francisco

Recent Profile Visitors

5,880 profile views
  1. Didn't want to derail any other threads but, via Reddit, saw this original pitch document for the first season of the Wire by David Simon. http://kottke.org.s3.amazonaws.com/the-wire/The_Wire_-_Bible.pdf There are some name changes (Stringy Bell to Stringer Bell, Aaron Barksdale to Avon Barksdale) and some interesting changes. I haven't read it in detail (it's the entire first season so not exactly a short read) but looks like the original intention was for
  2. I'd probably put the Cheese interrogation scene ("Ya'll some cold motherfuckers man") or the FBI profiling scene above those 2. The Wire had some hilarious moments. Those scenes still get me even today. If I remember it correctly from the book Homicide: Life on the Killing Streets, that scene was actually conducted in real life by the Baltimore Police Department.
  3. Dang it, I mixed up my authors. Sledge was the one who emphasized the mud and jungle conditions in With the Old Breed. I remember Leckie's experiences in Australia was an interesting dimension to World War II that isn't really portrayed much in media.
  4. It's been a few years since I've read it but I did like watching Band of Brothers: Pacific after and getting a visual representation of Leckie's experience (though Pacific is also based on Helmet for my Pillow). The thing I found most notable was Leckie's description of the mud, rain and the overall swampy conditions he and his fellow Marines had to endure. Even having read it, I was still not prepared for the absolutely muddy visuals they presented in BoB: Pacific .. between the book and the show, it really hit home the idea of having to fight a savage war while also living in squalor.
  5. Thanks. I've seen spoilers regarding who survives S3 in some post titles so I've been avoiding that subreddit like the plague. Haven't finished the Suburra TV series yet but this sounds like the right order to me.
  6. With proper English subtitles? Where?
  7. Woah, hey stranger! Didn't come back to this thread until now. Yeah must have been 2008 with the DC BwB. Will look at tickets and events and maybe even lodging. Will look to attend some function or event regardless.
  8. Two episodes in and so far it's standard Netflix good not great. I'm not a fan of Ortega's character and I can't tell if it's the dialogue, writing or the actress. She comes off as whiny and inept and seems to constantly be undermined as a cop by other cops. Completely agree that Joel Kinnamon comes off as REALLY stiff in some scenes. Never considered the green screen effect on his acting which would explain some of it. Episode 2 spoilers: It's also been awhile since I read the book and I know Kovacs has an enhanced body and special forces level martial abilities but I don't remember him being quite the super soldier they're portraying him thus far. I think that might just be my memory though.
  9. It's a comic book movie.. you have to leave the physics out especially in the case of Ant Man's growing and shrinking with respect to his mass. They should have left the whole conservation of mass out altogether in the first movie. Anyways, I was mostly lukewarm to Ant Man. Didn't even watch it in theaters which is an outlier for me with the Marvel movies. Loved that trailer though..
  10. About to start Drugs: From Discovery to Approval about drug development and the pharm industry as I just started work at a major biotech company and need a refresher on language and regulations. Also picked up A Fire Upon the Deep because, well, I find myself needing breaks of fiction whenever I read a non-fiction book that wasn't authored by Michael Lewis.
  11. You had me at Gomorrah.
  12. Watched the first episode of Planet Eart 2. Mesmerizing. I'm still amazed at the camera quality and how they captured some of the shots of the animals (the iguana babies through the snake mob, the underwater shot of the sloth swimming, the up close crab migration). I watched a lot of national geographic shows as a kid with my family and you'd think you've seen it all.. but no. There's so much mother nature out there.
  13. Finished A Deepness in the Sky by Vernor Vinge. Very good book. Re-defines my taste in science fiction or at least makes me want to branch out beyond my usual foray within the genre. My review (copy and pasted from the Space opera thread) is below. Next up either a quick re-read of Altered Carbon before the Netflix series is out or A Fire Upon the Deep. A Deepness in the Sky reception: I finished A Deepness in the Sky. Have to thank everyone that recommended this. Not sure I've read anything like this but my sci-fi lit genre is limited. I've either delved into cyberpunk (Altered Carbon) or military sci-fi / shallower space opera (Old Man's War, Forever War etc) and this was not that. Overall, I'm still not sure what to make of the novel though the ending was grand and page turning enough for me to really appreciate it now that I've put the book down. There were tedious parts in the middle where the vocabulary and science bogged me down because I'm not a PhD student in physics, astrophysics or some form of spatial engineering. Ramscoops and localizers don't mean much to me.. but after googling they were real things or at least realistic scientific proposals of space and electronics. Combine that with some of the concepts of time, space, neurobiology (which I'm more familiar with), the architecture of the starfaring vessels and the way people moved through them .. I ended up googling the author and I'm not surprised he was a professor of mathematics and CompSci. Sometimes the book felt like a science or engineering lesson and something intended for a master's / graduate level science background audience. The opera and scale of warfare and politics felt like it was on a more serious level compared to the Old Man War's series which I had immediately transitioned from. And it was deeper or more serious in it's content at all levels...orbital mechanics, economics and the economies of scale of industries in space and politics. Given the book was written in 1999, I wonder what science concepts Vernor Vinge would change or improve upon what the technology of today. It certainly left an impression on me.
  14. I finished A Deepness in the Sky. Have to thank everyone that recommended this. Not sure I've read anything like this but my sci-fi lit genre is limited. I've either delved into cyberpunk (Altered Carbon) or military sci-fi / shallower space opera (Old Man's War, Forever War etc) and this was not that. Overall, I'm still not sure what to make of the novel though the ending was epic and page turning enough for me to really appreciate it now that I've put the book down. There were tedious parts in the middle where the vocabulary and science bogged me down because I'm not a PhD student in physics, astrophysics or some form of spatial engineering. Ramscoops and localizers don't mean much to me.. but after googling they were real things or at least realistic scientific proposals of space and electronics. Combine that with some of the concepts of time, space, neurobiology (which I'm more familiar with), the architecture of the starfaring vessels and the way people moved through them .. I ended up googling the author and I'm not surprised he was a professor of mathematics and CompSci. Sometimes the book felt like a science or engineering lesson and something intended for a master's / graduate level science background audience. The opera and scale of warfare and politics felt like it was on a more serious level compared to the Old Man War's series which I had immediately transitioned from. And it was deeper or more serious in it's content at all levels...orbital mechanics, economics and the economies of scale of industries in space, politics, electronics. Given the book was written in 1999, I wonder what science concepts Vernor Vinge would change or improve upon what the technology of today. It certainly left an impression on me.
  15. Interesting. I did not know Discovery channel even made shows outside of their reality TV style stuff. Given the cast and quality of production, it's very surprising. If the show had not been on Netflix or talked about in this thread, I don't think I'd be aware it existed.