Colonel Green

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About Colonel Green

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  • Birthday 11/18/1987

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    Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada

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  1. Baelish and the Wild Wolf

    Rickard was already in the south, I believe, and had no time to call his banners. Beyond which, if this "misunderstanding" was that widely known, it would be known everywhere. It wasn't some localized event created by Petyr Baelish. ??? No he didn't. How exactly would he spread a rumour to Brandon's traveling party from his sickbed (or else, from back at the Fingers)? Brandon is much closer to the site of the abduction than Littlefinger would be, he would have known of Lyanna's disappearance before anybody at Riverrun did.
  2. Baelish and the Wild Wolf

    Just to follow up on my earlier comment, Brandon was never at Riverrun after Lyanna's abduction. He could not have been influenced by Littlefinger, even if Littlefinger was still there: "He was on his way to Riverrun when . . ." Strange, how telling it still made her throat grow tight, after all these years. ". . . when he heard about Lyanna, and went to King's Landing instead. It was a rash thing to do." She remembered how her own father had raged when the news had been brought to Riverrun. The gallant fool, was what he called Brandon. (ACOK Catelyn VII)
  3. The Ironborn were always raiding the North in the pre-Targaryen period. There were raids at various points in post-unification history, in the post-dragons period when royal authority frayed, but that's still a considerable improvement overall.
  4. Baelish and the Wild Wolf

    How do you know he didn't want those things? Rickard went to KL to try to tamp down the most immediate crisis, i.e., the threat to execute Brandon. That's just practical, given the circumstances.
  5. Speculations, news, theories for season 7. (includes leaks )

    There are any number of ways Sandor could end up fighting Gregor that don't involve revenge. In any event, there has to be something splashy in store for Gregor, whether or not it involves fighting his brother. In both mediums he's given a ton of buildup over the course of a whole book/series. In the book he's clearly going to win Cersei's freedom, at least, but in the show that didn't happen. He killed a few Faith members in Season 6, but nothing else, and from Lads, all he does in Season 7 is try to chop up the wight they bring back south. Moreover, in the book, UnGregor merits inclusion in Bran's AGOT-era dream sequence, alongside the Stark sisters, Jaime, and Sandor.
  6. Speculations, news, theories for season 7. (includes leaks )

    As far as that goes, Gregor still hasn't done anything notable that would remotely justify keeping him around after his duel with Oberyn, nor does in Season 7, from the Lads spoilers. So I assume there's some big fight for him coming up in Season 8, which might be against Sandor, though I suppose it could be something else.
  7. Baelish and the Wild Wolf

    Brandon was traveling in the Riverlands when he heard about Lyanna's abduction. He was not at Riverrun. Even if Baelish was still at Riverrun at the time (unclear), it would be impossible for him to have told Brandon anything. Beyond that, Baelish was still a boy at this point, not the devious schemer he would become.
  8. Euron has no reason to ally with Cersei. Aegon, meanwhile, is for Dany to deal with; he'll be in charge when Dany arrives.
  9. The Iron Throne-enforced peace, in the form of reduced and/or non-existent Ironborn raiding would be the most obvious benefit for the North over most of the period.
  10. If the overall balance is positive, how is that not a success story? If we define success as meaning that there's no war, sure, but a net reduction in war (and, seemingly, major population growth, given the differences in army size in many areas) is a success.
  11. The point being, the independence thing only occurred to one person, the Greatjon, and only eventually. It wasn't something that people were thinking about anymore.
  12. They don't really jump on it quickly at all. They spend quite a long time debating which royal claimant they should back, with Robb ruling out backing Renly because Renly can't come before Stannis and Joffrey is, as far as they know, the legitimate king. They only arrive at declaring independence as a last resort. Northern separatism was not a long-simmering issue until that point. The reason the lords didn't consider it is because it had been almost 300 years. People were used to it, and Ned, of all people, had strong relationships with the rulers of several of the other kingdoms, by marriage and friendship.
  13. Sansa knew about Jeynes faith

    Sansa was confused. "I don't understand," she said. "Where is Jeyne's father? Why can't Ser Boros take her to him instead of Lord Petyr having to do it?" She had promised herself she would be a lady, gentle as the queen and as strong as her mother, the Lady Catelyn, but all of a sudden she was scared again. For a second she thought she might cry. "Where are you sending her? She hasn't done anything wrong, she's a good girl." "She's upset you," the queen said gently. "We can't be having that. Not another word, now. Lord Baelish will see that Jeyne's well taken care of, I promise you." She patted the chair beside her. "Sit down, Sansa. I want to talk to you." The point of the protest is that she doesn't understand why Jeyne's not being taken to her father, not Baelish specifically. You've now jumped two books ahead, to when Sansa's with Baelish. We don't know, at this point, whether she remembers that particular detail; she's given no sign that she does, and she outright says she tries not to think about all the people she's lost.
  14. Sansa knew about Jeynes faith

    She didn't protest because Baelish was shady, she protested because Jeyne being taken away looked like punishment and she was confused about why Jeyne wasn't being taken to her father. "Often", but not Sansa. She tries not to think about these things; she explicitly says that, and that she doesn't know where Jeyne ended up.