Direwolf Blitzer

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About Direwolf Blitzer

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    Sellsword
  • Birthday 01/01/1981

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    The North[east]

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  1.   I don't think the letter's author expects to get Mance's kid, or anything else. Would anyone, even Ramsay, expect Jon to respond to that letter by turning over the people named in it?     True that. Two questions on that: Is chaos at the wall a predictable result? And who would want it? I'd give a qualified yes to the first one - some people, people who know a little about the Watch and the wildlings, could predict it. So, Mel, Mance, Stannis, etc. But as to who benefits... I don't know. I can't think of anyone other than the conspiracy of assassins, but might that be sort of a blunt instrument?    Bonus question: Why did Bowen Marsh, et. al, even bother killing Jon? Why not let him take the wildlings to Winterfell? Marsh can be Interim Lord Commander, and if he's lucky, Jon gets killed in battle along with most of the wildlings, and he doesn't even need to launch a coup. It just takes care of itself.     I think it's entirely plausible Ramsay could have all this information. 
  2. I had not thought of Melisandre, but that makes a lot of sense. Mel's fortunes are so tied to Stannis', it would make sense that she'd want him to march. And if he arrived at Winterfell to find Stannis still alive, well, hey; all she said was there was a letter coming. She never claimed to know its contents, or whether they were true.   What got me on Manderley (perhaps with a Mance assist) was thinking of who benefits from the likely outcome. Certainly, Mel benefits. Hm!
  3. The GNC is a fun, well-fleshed out theory. And not one I can take any credit for. But if you think of the connection of those songs to the night's watch (rather than their connections to eating people, disguised women, etc), then the mind does wander.   I think the question is: Did the author of the letter expect Jon to march? Almost certainly. I think whoever wrote it knows Jon isn't the type to surrender an innocent woman to Ramsay, even if it's not his sister.   But why would Ramsay or Roose want this? Only Jon's allies benefit from Jon marching on Winterfell. At best, it's a break-even for Jon's enemies. I mean, do Roose or Ramsay really care if Jon is still alive, as long as he keeps his NW vows and stays out of the politics of the realm?
  4. The only one of the seven kingdoms whose lord is actually styled a prince. Clearly not the least powerful.      It's silly.   To the OP: Quentyn sucks, and I hate him. But a guy on the Internet did a great job of making his arc seem relevant.   https://meereeneseblot.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/water-gardens-and-blood-oranges-part-i-the-viper-and-the-grass/   It's a 6 part series, and worth reading, if you're so inclined.    Now, did we need the person of Quentyn, and the hundreds of pages he took up in order to advance this plot? I say, Hell no. But there it is.
  5. I more or less stole all this from Apple Martini's GNC thread http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/topic/77828-the-great-northern-conspiracy-reexamined/   But why not? Wouldn't Jon marching on Winterfell actually fit the plans of the conspiracy perfectly?   To quote Apple,    
  6. So I was just typing a response to you and realized I was probably pretty wrong. I was gonna say: Doesn't Petyr need Harry? His current hold on the Eyrie rests on his being Sweetrobin's de facto guardian, and SR is sickly and unreliable. So wouldn't Petyr want his hooks in the next Lord of the Eyrie? But then I thought about it, and it seems very much unlike Littlefinger to rely on the kindness of strangers. I mean, assuming Harry inherits and marries Sansa, what's to stop them from just throwing Littlefinger out of the Vale? Granted, he's Lord Paramount of the Trident. But the Eyrie isn't his seat. Assuming he doesn't want to retire to Harrenhal, how does Littlefinger stay on top at the Eyrie?