mormont

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About mormont

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  • Birthday 05/10/1972

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    St Andrews, Scotland

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  1. U.S. Politics 2016: It Can't Happen Here

    That's Trump though. Wants to be admired. Tells people what they want to hear. Doesn't bother with details.
  2. Footy: Yaya Ascendant

    Man U and Tottenham are in form? Man U have won 1, drawn 4 and lost 1 of their last 6 PL games: Tottenham have won 2, drawn 3 and lost 1. Is that what 'in form' looks like?
  3. U.S. Politics 2016: It Can't Happen Here

    There was a request to drop the debate on the principles of abortion in the last thread: please respect that and stick to more immediately relevant topics. Thanks.
  4. Spiderman: Homecoming

    The film has to introduce the character to the Marvel Universe (at least, as a lead). Also, Peter's a teenager. So, there's a limit to how 'established' the film can make Spidey. It's not an origin story, they have established him as having a pre-existing low-level heroing career, I think they've done as much as they can. The 'emerging independence from a protective mentor' plot isn't that original but it's all in how you do it - as it is in any movie, really.
  5. Spiderman: Homecoming

    http://movieweb.com/spider-man-homecoming-villain-tinkerer/ Unless you've got a lot more info about the plot than I have, I think this is a bit premature.
  6. Spiderman: Homecoming

    No, Liz Allan is a minor character from the comics who did, indeed, go to high school with Peter Parker, dated Flash Thompson and later married Norman Osborn. I think 'Michelle' is an original character, though.
  7. Spiderman: Homecoming

    Yeah, that looks great. Excited for this one.
  8. US politics 2016: I can see Russia from my White House

    What are you even talking about? This post is largely gibberish, a nebulous rant utterly unrelated to anything I said.
  9. Convince me that Brexit wasn't a terrible act of self-harm

    Sure. In the same way that not every SNP voter is pro-independence, or not every Lib Dem voter is enthused by PR. Voting is like that. My main point is that despite the narrow margin, ever since the referendum the views of 'the British public' have been characterised in ways that suggest a uniformity of opinion that doesn't, in fact, exist. SeanF's comment is an example of that. It does no harm to remind people that in fact, 'the British public' don't have a single point of view on Europe, even now. This is just more collective blaming. 'Experts' are the new 'politicians', it seems: not to be trusted, but collectively responsible for every mistake made by anyone the person speaking cares to stick under the same nebulous umbrella with them.
  10. Convince me that Brexit wasn't a terrible act of self-harm

    Can we? OK, then, by the same token can we also say that the 52% sold on Leave weren't all completely unhappy with the EU?
  11. Convince me that Brexit wasn't a terrible act of self-harm

    Because they are different people, it's not 'their' error. And are politicians usually described as 'experts'? Do we draw the category as widely as necessary to discredit it? Definitely not an 'expert', except perhaps in his own mind. Yeah, I've seen lots of experts discussing why they failed to correctly predict the referendum result. You'll more rarely find people discussing why not joining the Euro wasn't a mistake, but that's because it's not really a very good news story. Also, you are exaggerating the extent to which 'experts' predicted that not joining the Euro would be detrimental. Unlike on the referendum, expert opinion on that subject was very much split: some felt it would be beneficial to join, many others warned that it was risky, and very few suggested that not joining would be a disaster.
  12. Ormond: related to Agnes' popularity in Scotland (currently low, it's still seen as old-fashioned, but it may be due for a revival) - do you know that a popular Scottish nickname for women called 'Agnes' was/is 'Senga'?
  13. US politics 2016: I can see Russia from my White House

    He's talking about one specific union official, actually. And you know this because...? Where's the evidence that people like Soros and the Koch brothers aren't having a champagne party over Trump's victory? The issue is, is it better for a child to be born and suffer or not to be born at all? Your presumption is that not being born = being 'fucked over', and that any life is better than no life. You need to recognise that this is a view many people don't hold.
  14. Convince me that Brexit wasn't a terrible act of self-harm

    Well, that 52% of them really disliked, at least. 48% were just fine with it. It would be really weird if they did, because by and large they are different people, often in very different fields. This lumping together of 'experts' into a single undifferentiated mass is bizarre. I understand that it makes it easier to shut one's ears, but it's ridiculous. Expertise, generally. You know, boring stuff like having read, written and published in an area, having experience, having your insight recognised by leaders in the field, and so on. Usually, experts are recognised as such because they've been proven right about a lot of things in the past (and that their conclusions are based on evidence). Being wrong about one thing does not mean they should be dismissed out of hand from now on. Most of us are wrong sometimes. Experts tend to be quite interested in finding out why they were wrong, by the way. Sometimes the media even invite them to come and talk about that. You are the second person I've seen here in two days suggest that undergraduate study makes you an expert: I hope that unlike the last guy, you're not serious. I have yet to see any evidence of it.
  15. Star Wars Rogue One: Now With Less Rouge

    That works slightly better as a retcon, but at the same time is clearly a retcon.