TrackerNeil

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About TrackerNeil

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    Trackerneil

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  1. Not promoting my work here, but that of Babyraven, whom some may remember from the board in the old days. As part of a film class, she produced a short documentary, and I was honored to have my podcast be part of it. I am sure that Babyraven would appreciate any likes/comments you throw her way--she did a good job!
  2. That's true, yes, but I think CT's main point was that the parts of Mordor where the "evil" citizens dwelt were destroyed, and their inhabitants with them. That spared Aragorn the onerous task of having to decide what to do with the orcs and trolls who'd served Sauron. That is the point I think he was making, and an interesting one to discuss, in my view. (I don't want to speak for you, CT, and if I have gotten you wrong I'll remove this comment.)
  3. You realize you wrote far, far more on this than Dan and I ever did? If it makes anyone buy this book, my editor will be grateful as well. (We don't make a dime from this.) I'm not going to defend anything we wrote--we had our chance to speak and that's that--but I urge everyone to be critical not just of The Lord of the Rings but of all media. Critical analysis is vital to understanding art, and it's not harsh but loving. Trust me, we wouldn't have set out to write and publish this if we didn't love Middle-Earth and those who dwell there.
  4. Totally agreed. Rick's plan was to put his faith both in some random junkyard people and in a burned-face dude with a history of cruel obedience to Negan. Rick is decent at the rough stuff--sticking guns in peoples' faces and killing off small groups--but when it comes to strategy, Mr Grimes isn't exactly Sun Tzu. It's not a bad idea to form an alliance with the heapsters, but good alliances are formed slowly, taking time to learn about each other and to build trust. The heapsters did nothing but make Rick fight some spiked zombie and then demand guns, neither of which reflected a deep commitment to the cause of resisting Negan. The Kingdom and Hillside make better allies because they have something at stake in this struggle; the heapsters were mere mercenaries, willing to fight for whomever paid them more. A good leader would have recognized this and kept the heapsters at arm's length, making them prove their dedication to the cause before letting them into Alexandria en masse. Rick, of course, is not a good leader; instead he's the type to make threats from his knees. No wonder Negan leaves him in charge; as Red Snow pointed out, killing him might clear the path for someone slightly more competent. Edited to add: Jadis is sure in a pickle, isn't she? She signed up with Negan with the likely expectation of quickly squashing Rick's rebellion and then claiming her share of the loot. Instead, she's got a nasty little war on her hands, and there's no way Negan's going to let her back out of it. She can't easily switch sides either; who'd trust her after her betrayal at Alexandria? Nope, she's in it now, and the best she can hope for is for a swift victory by the Saviors and a lifetime under Negan's thumb.
  5. I'm wondering just how many times Rick has to spearhead failed uprisings against Negan before the Alexandrians finally realize they need better leadership.
  6. There have to be some "Six Feet Under" fans here, right? If so, there's a podcast you might find interesting. "Digging Six Feet Under" is hosted by a licensed funeral director, so while you're enjoying talk about the series you can learn stuff about the business. Disclaimer: I have guest commentated on this podcast, and if that makes me a shameless self-promoter I accept your rebuke.
  7. What's this scenario? I am intrigued.
  8. Because he's an egomaniacal asshole?
  9. I don't know what that scenario was, but I am sure I put no faith in Republicans--any Republicans. They've demonstrated time and time again that although they may not much care for Donald Trump, they'll do nothing to hinder him. Unless the American people turn strongly and severely against The Donald, the GOP will back him at every turn.
  10. Our only hope is that the Republican Party destroys itself with its own power, as it did 2001-2006.
  11. I think that "kidding yourself" pretty much sums up most of the impetus to repeal the Affordable Care Act. That, or thinly disguised indifference to human suffering.
  12. Ordinarily, I'd point out that political scientists know that most politicians try to keep most of their promises, but this is the Great Orange Ego Elemental we're talking about. So who knows what Trump will bother doing?
  13. Read that in 2015 and would recommend it to anyone who ever uses social media.
  14. I sure would hate to sound pedantic.
  15. I agree, and I'll add this. The Democrats worked for more than a year to come up with the ACA, but health insurance reform was a party priority for Democrats so that made sense. The GOP doesn't care about reforming anything about health care, so why does anyone think the party will spend a ton of political capital tackling this issue? I'm 50-50 on where I think this will go. Part of me thinks Republicans will kick up a lot of dust and then pack it in, and another part suspects that the party may be just dysfunctional enough to screw up the ACA and incur the wrath of millions of voters--some in red states.