Wizz-The-Smith

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About Wizz-The-Smith

  • Rank
    Re-forging Valyrian Steel using half forgotten spells
  • Birthday 12/28/1978

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    Male
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    The Hollow Hills
  • Interests
    Asoiaf - British History - Sport

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  1. Tyrion VIII, Dance 33 Hey LM That's interesting, what do you think it could mean/symbolise? Penny has brown hair and pinkish cheeks normally so she's not an albino, do you think it could hint at the other woods witch's abilities in line with your thoughts up thread? Or is she actually resembling a weirwood tree at this moment and why? Penny was described as weeping in the paragraph so I looked up weeping woman and Arya sees the statue of the Weeping woman of Lys next to the Lion of night [Tyrion?] in the HoBaW, but that feels more like a coincidence at this point. What you thinking my friend?
  2. What is Ghost?

    Agreed.
  3. Thanks RR. Hi @Unchained, cool thread and I love the Robb-tree-Grey 'Wind' link, great work. As RR mentioned I've recently stumbled upon some interesting information researching the hollow hills/Sidhe/wind connection. The godlike Tuatha De Dannan/Sidhe in Celtic myth are very much like our human greenseers, they were humans with supernatural powers, seers, shape-shifters and lived extremely long lives dwelling in their hollow hills. It was also said the Sidhe could inhabit the wind and be seen by passers by in the rustling leaves, an inhabited godlike or divine wind. In fact I think George is using the different meanings for the word Sidhe in Old Irish cleverly, all of which can be related to the old gods/CotF/greenseers and wind. I still have to research this further but here are some thoughts on the matter I posted in the Bran wind thread. Sidhe as hollow hills Searching the mythology of hollow hills I found they are directly linked to Celtic myth in that they are another name for the Sidhe [or Sidhe mounds] that the Tuatha De Dannan retreated into after invasion by the Milesians. We have only visited two hollow hills in the series, both associated with CotF and human greenseers, so I was pleased to note the other uses of the word Sidhe in connection to this... The Sidhe as CotF The Sidhe are also often thought of as the ‘Faery folk of the mounds’, or small people dressed in green living in their hills etc. There is obviously a connection to be made with the CotF here. However, the small faery or Fey image a lot of people have of the Sidhe isn’t always the case in Irish lore. The Sidhe as human greenseers The Sidhe of Irish myth [or the Tuatha De Dannan] were different in that they had gods living amongst them, human gods. These human gods had supernatural powers, lived extremely long lives but could still be killed as mortals, and they too also lived in the hollow hills. There are tales of these Sidhe being shapeshifters and seers as well. Again it seems reasonable to make a connection with the human greenseers in asoiaf. So the word Sidhe seems to be associated with the hollow hills, and alludes to the CotF and human greenseers, but it doesn’t stop there. In her awesome Brans powers thread @evita mgfs noted very early on that the word ‘gust’ seemed like a clue for us readers to look out for a presence in the wind. Sidhe meaning wind or gust The word Sídhe can also be translated in Old Irish as ‘wind or gust’ and the godlike Sidhe have much to do with the wind. They inhabit and journey in the whirling winds and when the country people see the leaves whirling on the road they bless themselves, because they believe the Sidhe to be passing by. Then of course there is George straight out comparing the Others to something like 'the Sidhe made of ice'. I shall return, it's late here. Cheers Unchained.
  4. Hi Isobel Harper. I love the Icarus connection. Adding to the wax, the structural element of the wings were made from branches of osier trees. Varieties of these willows such as the red osier, have tough, flexible twigs or branches that are used for 'wickerwork'. My thoughts instantly turned to Bran's wicker basket/wickerman connections. Great work @LmL Hey PKJ. If wax is probably connected to beeswax then perhaps all things 'honeycomb' are worth considering? The caverns/tunnels are honeycombed, currently home to Bran and potentially many greenseers from the past. The Eyrie and the House of Black and White are also described as having honeycombed passageways and lower levels. There are also quite a few references to people eating honeycomb in the text. Perhaps a link to be found? Talk of beekeepers, wax, honeycombs and the like reminds me of the 'Hive mind' we find in weirwoodnet, and some of George's other work. Anyway, I'm thinking out loud having just caught up. Really enjoyed this one @LmL, and thanks for the mention. [Love the pointy hill catch too ]
  5. BRAN’S GROWING POWERS AFTER his FINAL POV in ADwD

    I agree. Though slightly different in terms of research, the hollow hills and their Celtic influence is I think a good example of this, particularly with the old Gaelic word Sidhe. [Pronounced Shee or Shay] Old Irish has various meanings for the word Sidhe, all of which fit rather nicely into the Celtic angle of my hills essay. I of course started with the clue that Sidhe also meant hollow hills but the Celtic link grew with some research. Here’s a quick explanation… Sidhe as hollow hills Searching the mythology of hollow hills I found they are directly linked to Celtic myth in that they are another name for Sidhe [or Sidhe mounds]. We have only visited two hollow hills in the series, both associated with CotF and human greenseers, so I was pleased to note the other uses of the word Sidhe in connection to this... The Sidhe as CotF The Sidhe are often thought of as the ‘Faery folk of the mounds’, small people often dressed in green living in their hills etc. There is obviously a connection to be made with the CotF here. However, the small faery image a lot of people have isn’t always the case in Irish lore. The Sidhe as human greenseers The Sidhe of Irish myth [or the Tuatha De Dannan] were different in that they had gods living amongst them, human gods. These human gods had supernatural powers, lived extremely long lives but could still be killed as mortals, and they too also lived in the hollow hills. There are tales of these Sidhe being shapeshifters and seers as well. Again it seems reasonable to make a connection with the human greenseers in asoiaf. So the word Sidhe seems to be associated with the hollow hills, CotF and human greenseers, but it doesn’t stop there. This thread in particular has looked at the various powers of the greenseers, one such ability being controlling the wind. @evita mgfs noted very early on that the word ‘gust’ seemed like a clue for us readers to look out for a presence in the wind. Sidhe meaning wind or gust The word Sídhe can also be translated in Old Irish as ‘wind or gust’ and certainly the Sidhe have much to do with the wind. They journey in whirling winds and when old country people see the leaves whirling on the road they bless themselves, because they believe the Sidhe to be passing by. Celtic lore which seems to parallel the greenseers/CotF in their hollow hills inhabiting the whirling winds and rustling leaves etc, all from the ‘hollow hill/Sidhe link. Instantly Celtic mythology became more interesting than it was already for me. Ser Gendry of the Hollow Hill and the Gentry of Ireland Not bound to their hollow hills, the Sidhe were often called ‘the Gentry’ by the country folk on account of their tall, noble appearance and silvery sweet speech. The Gentry is one letter away from Gendry, who is of course tall and of noble appearance himself. Ser Gentry of the Hollow Hill. I’m a little unclear where this one fits in, but is a good example of how digging and following a potential pattern can have its rewards. I have my eye on Gendry and his link to the hollow hills moving forward. I'll stop here as there is plenty more to research, but if nothing else this continues to prove that George is weaving all these myths/inspirations into one big melting pot for us to research and enjoy. While one poster can say ‘this is Norse inspired’ another can claim some Celtic influence on the same subject, and so on. Most likely they would both be right, the joy for me is the journey and seeing how all these inspirations are masterfully pieced together. Hi @GloubieBoulga I too have enjoyed your posts on the forum, I join our resident raven in welcoming you to Bran's growing powers. As RR mentions, we're a friendly group and love to read anything Bran [especially thoughtful analysis ] We don't have a structure like a normal re-read thread, so feel free to post anything Bran/old gods related. Thanks GloubieBoulga. Haha You're a brave man LmL, those talons are sharp and the teeth sharper.
  6. BRAN’S GROWING POWERS AFTER his FINAL POV in ADwD

    Same here, great fun. Haha, 'tis true I've yet to really re-emerge from the hollow hills. I want to explore them thoroughly, and these tunnels go on for miles I'll have you know. Greywater Watch seems a good choice, and I do have green eyes. Our delay in finishing the series did lead to much punning, nennymoaning, and posting with naughty greenseers on your part, so every cloud and all that. Oh, and an awesome poetry thread. [Excuse me as I try to deflect my down-delvings] Nice, I like the ideas regarding Lady Forlorn and Widow’s Wail. In fact I looked at the word ‘wail’ for further clues as well. The Wailing Tower at Harrenhal was something I researched for my hills essay. Obviously the wind blowing through the fissures in the tower walls make that wailing sound, just the sort of thing we look out for here in the Bran re-read. But there are also said to be cavernous vaults situated beneath the Wailing Tower, just the sort of underground clues I was looking for. Nice catch with the ‘ragged’ and ‘shaggy’ connection. I agree there is a ghostly feel about Winterfell, the wind there is also described as having ‘ghostly fingers’, plus there are all those Stark ghosts roaming about of course. The hollow hills being attached to the Faeries/Sidhe is interesting in that respect as it’s said in Celtic legend that when they [the Fae, or the greenseers in this case] appear it can be in a gust of wind, and there is often a strange sound. That sound is normally like the humming of thousands of bees, but George could play with these inspirations if indeed this the case. The main point here is when the faeries appear it can be in the wind while also playing with sounds. Furthermore they can silence a mortal [normally one playing faery music] which reminded me of the three times a silence fell on the characters in the Prologue etc… Cool link with the black pond and the strange sounds at the House of Black and White too. Hmm, great point about the trees being the lungs of the Earth, the breathing, sighing, whistling, whispering, wailing, howling, singing and indeed speaking could therefore also be attributed to the trees as well as the wind. Thinking out loud, could that explain the windless night? Perhaps the stronger greenseers controlling the weirwoods might not need the wind to rustle their leaves, they can do it themselves, as they breathe/speak the leaves rustle and speech. I always thought it was George’s way of telling us that Bran has ultimate control over the tree, no wind necessary. The previous association with the wind enabling the voice via the rustling is cast aside and Bran takes charge of the tree, he speaks and the leaves rustle. [Bran seems like a particularly powerful greenseer, I think he is the embodiment of the tree at that moment] A sort of puppeteer as you have previously mentioned, going so far as to reach down and brush Theon’s brow with one of his many blood red hands. Perhaps this is the sort of power [and then some] that some of those First Men/naughty greenseers had? The ability to control creatures yes, but seemingly inanimate objects too such as rocks, trees, fire, water, or perhaps even comets and moons with amazing precision? The AGOT Prologue has wielded many a clue, but yes the words catching in the throat has baffled us. I mentioned the Sidhe/Fae’s tendencies to steal voices up thread, but more research needed. I agree that is something we could look at again in V.2. I love the 1-2-3 greenseeing nod as well, 'oh oh oh' how he loves his threes, great stuff. Love that quote!! I think it’s a good idea, really I have no clue what is down there [apart from having that hunch about a greenseer cave, throne and all]. Plus the Stark Kings and Lords have those swords to keep their souls from wandering, so why not be able to restrain a terrible presence in some way as well. The lower level being partly collapsed is interesting, is it partly collapsed yet still accessible [if not a little dangerous] or is it partly collapsed concealing the entrance to that level completely? If the latter applies then could that be an attempt to keep any spirits at bay? Basically blocking it on purpose. It would be similar to the ‘blocking stones’ we see in our real world barrows, equally in an attempt to keep the spirits in. Really interesting topic though. Thanks @ravenous reader for another awesome post and a reminder that we have much to sink our teeth into in the upcoming V.2 thread. Truly great work, again.
  7. Hi @Prof. Cecily and welcome to the forum. Thank you for your kind words as well, that means a lot, I'm really pleased you've enjoyed the thread. I'm sure you'll have a great time here, so many threads and good posters to sink your teeth into. Cheers Prof. Cecily
  8. POEMS (or other sundry quotes) that remind you of ASOIAF

    I was a listener in the woods, I was a gazer at the stars, I was not blind where secrets were concerned, I was silent in a wilderness, I was talkative among many, I was mild in the mead-hall, I was stern in battle, I was gentle towards allies, I was a physician of the sick, I was weak towards the feeble, I was strong towards the powerful, I was not parsimonious lest I should be burdensome, I was not arrogant though I was wise, I was not given to vain promises though I was strong, I was not unsafe though I was swift, I did not deride the old though I was young, I was not boastful though I was a good fighter, I would not speak about anyone in their absence, I would not reproach, but I would praise, I would not ask, but I would give. Cormac Mac Cuileannain King and Poet of Cashel, AD 836 - 908
  9. Haha, yes it may have doubled the size of his kingdom.
  10. There isn't a great deal of information on the Green Queen other than what I mentioned. Durwald however was noted to have been a particularly weak king, and it was said he ruled as far as you could piss off the walls of Storm's End. Although one might question why he was such an easy foe? Perhaps because the Green Queen was a greenseer with more power? It's hard to say for sure, but the ingredients are there. I agree there are greenseers with more power than others, Bran seems a good precedent even if still in 'training'. I think we may see evidence for that in the histories, and particularly the ruins/tales I highlight in my OP. It seems to me that some of the First Men wars would have been 'greenseer wars' and the strong Houses of the current narrative seem to be the victors more often than not. [Or the Stark's at least] Stark vs Warg King - Stark wins. Stark vs Glover - Stark wins. Gardener/Reach vs Manderly - Gardener/Reach wins. Potentially Stark vs Blackwood - Stark wins etc... The Warg King, the Glover's, the Manderly's and the Blackwood's are I think all potential 'Petty King greenseers' from history [Or Petty Kings with greenseers under their command] backing the thought of a difference in power/ability between these foes. Cheers LM.
  11. Songs that Make Us Think of A Song of Ice and Fire

    Over on the Riverlands Web we had running joke about our favourite horse, 'Stranger' being locked up on the Quiet Isle. It always reminded me of Iron Maiden's 'Stranger in a Strange Land', some of the lyrics are quite apt..
  12. Hi LM. I'm still not entirely convinced but Mother Mole [or woods witch's in general] being a potential greenseer candidate/s is perhaps strengthened by the tale of the Green Queen in the Stormlands. Another example of a woods witch, one in which she held the Rainwood for a generation against King Durwald I Durrandon, the Rainwood also being full of caves of course. Her name and the tale itself is certainly in support of your idea. Maybe the characters that receive these visions have the power but with no way to tap into it or become aware of it? Hence becoming agents of the old gods as they can be communicated with at some level? Perhaps Bran wouldn't have known what to do with his powers without a little guidance for example. Or of course you are straight up right in your hunch. Again thank you for pointing this out.
  13. Hey LM. Good points, I agree the fact she made her home in the burrow beneath a 'hollow' tree is worthy of greenseer consideration straight away. I am reluctant to label her as such because of the other examples we get of woods witch's, hermits/healers etc... They all seem drawn to the caves and this may be where their powers/prophecy come from, but at the moment I tend to see them as potential agents of the old gods/greenseers dwelling their caves/hollows. [GoHH etc] However, I am always open minded on such matters, and I can see the logic in what you're proposing for sure. The text is tantalising and could well suggest greenseer action, whether by the individual or indeed other means. Cheers LM
  14. No problem. Yes, the symbolism of the bat is much the same [As could be expected I suppose] In similar fashion to the cave symbolism, the bat is a symbol of rebirth as it is a creature that lives in the belly [or tummy ] of 'Mother Earth'. They emerge from the womb-like caves every evening at dusk, therefore 'reborn' from the womb every evening. If associated with bat symbolism you are normally extremely aware of your surroundings. Sometimes you can be overly sensitive to the feelings of others, and you are also perceptive on a psychic level, thus prone to having prophetic dreams. Sounds half Sansa half greenseer. I haven't got more to add at the moment, but it continues to amaze me how ridiculously detailed these books are. Down to the tiniest bit of information, George wraps it all up with bows on. Cheers Leech.