Wizz-The-Smith

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About Wizz-The-Smith

  • Rank
    Re-forging Valyrian Steel using half forgotten spells
  • Birthday 12/28/1978

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    Male
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    The Hollow Hills
  • Interests
    Asoiaf - British History - Sport

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  1. A step back and a look at "time" in ASOIAF on the grand scale.

    Agreed. The Faerie lore/Irish myth has the hollow hills/burial mounds/islands as the entrance into this underworld and while known as many different names, one such is Tir na nog, translated as 'Land of youth'. Visitors into this underworld loose all concept of time and in some cases will stay for what they think is a period of three years only to find they have been gone from their world for three-hundred years. Or sometimes the opposite is true and they stay for years only to return to their world at the very stage they left, not losing an hour. The gods will often appear to these visitors in a puff of mist and can be seen travelling through the real world in the form of wind, often a rustling of the leaves in this wind is a sign of their presence. If GRRM is playing with these concepts [which I think he is] then the caves/underworld and weirwood trees are perfect tools at his disposal. And on top of the trees not comprehending time as humans do, he straight out tells us in the text that 'the caves are timeless'. Again agreed. If the caves/caverns are the asoiaf version of the underworld then we have the extensive cave system below the Wall, and I like @Cgrav's idea of the Wall as a sort of figurative River Styx.
  2. The Grey King fought Garth the Greenhand

    I took my sweet time about it, but yes I am glad I got there in the end. Thanks for the heads up!
  3. Hey LM. That's an interesting observation, there is a flower in the real world called 'Blood flower' as seen here http://www.bhg.com/gardening/plant-dictionary/annual/blood-flower/ and many flowers that bloom red have some sort of blood symbolism attached to them through myth. In New Zealand there is a flower called 'The Blood of Jesus flower' seen here http://static.snopes.com/app/uploads/2017/04/blood-of-jesus.jpg. But I wouldn't say these are pale flowers, and of course none of these examples are seen to be growing from the wounds of the dead. The aboriginal Australians tell a myth where out of blood, flowers were created and these flowers do speak towards justice from a brutal massacre. A young maiden named Purlimil fled her tribe as she refused to marry a particularly violent man from her tribe named Turlta. In a fit of rage Turlta sought her out and found she had settled with a new tribe who loved her dearly. So angry was Turlta that he killed them all, including Purlimil. A year later he returned to the site only to find that there were no bones left just a field full of magnificent red flowers with black centres. [Again these are not pale flowers] This mythic archetype of blood in connection with flowers is still seen today, most famously in the poem 'In Flanders Fields', a reminder of the devastation and loss of the soldiers in WW1. So perhaps the Blood bloom flower is symbolic of the killing that took place there? Alternatively, flowers need nutrients to grow as well as water and those include nitrogen, potassium, iron etc... all of which can be found in blood. You can actually get plant feed called 'Bud Blood' which has all these nutrients included in the product. Less likely, but perhaps George is drawing on this fact? We have seen weirwood saplings in the series with no mention of Blood Blooms, but of course this is a fantasy novel involving trees that drink blood so perhaps you're right and these are the first shoots of weirwood trees. I tend to prefer the symbolic angle to these arguments. Not sure if that helps really but worth a research. Cheers LM.
  4. The Grey King fought Garth the Greenhand

    Hi @Crowfood's Daughter I am very late to the party but wanted to compliment you on this wonderful essay/thread, truly brilliant stuff. And also thank you for adding another hollow hill to the list, and a significant one at that it seems. My word search worked well in documenting the various hollow hills but failed to look at the bigger picture so to speak and Hammerhorn Keep paints an important picture indeed. The forum has been richer for your finds and has led to some fruitful discussion regards the brother vs brother archetype, really great work! I have some catching up to do but thought this thread deserves a bump on top of a well deserved thumbs up.
  5. Hi @Darry Man Thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts/ideas. I love the parallels you've drawn from Reek II and Jon V in ADWD, and of course the subterranean evidence you've found at both Moat Cailin and Mole's Town are perfect for this topic. And as you say, complete with living-dead inhabitants, good work. @ravenous reader had a look at some of the other evidence to be found at Mole's Town earlier in the thread. Here is the link, It is well worth a read. [The comments section is also worth a read] Nice catch with the abandoned holdfast at the God's Eye, thanks for that. In typical GRRM style there are bound to be more hidden or dotted around as @Crowfood's Daughter found in her excellent essay 'The Grey King fought Garth the Gardener' when discussing Hammerhorn Keep. I think you've probably read it but I will link that here too for anyone who hasn't, it's a truly brilliant read. Regards the weirwood trees always being positioned above these hollow hills enabling the roots to form a potential throne or giving access to the weirnet, I've found this isn't always the case. I have concentrated on the sites that do have this set up, but as Crowfood's Daughter has shown this doesn't seem to be a necessity. I think it's the darkness and magic of the caves that is the main interest for those greenseers of the past building their castles/holdfasts above these hollow hills. And this seems evident in Essos..... Nice!! A good example of what I'm talking about and one I hadn't looked at yet, again thanks for that. I have planned to study the subterranean in Essos for a while now but a forum hiatus put that on hold, this is just the sort of thing to look for. A couple of other good examples are the House of Black and White and the island of Leng. The former is built on a knoll [hill] with many underground levels and has parallels to BR's cave etc... While Leng has the same ancient set up as Westeros, with the underworld only accessible via the abandoned ruins to be found throughout the jungle, very much like our First Men of Westeros building on the hollow hills. This seems consistent and insinuates that the ancients of Planetos knew exactly what they were doing when building these structures with subterranean access. Lorath [especially the Boashii religion] Norvos, and Andalos are of interest amongst quite a few others. Thanks Darry Man, while on my forum hiatus I have still been lurking [the addiction is hard to kick] and I have enjoyed reading your thoughts.
  6. 'The Killing Word' -- A Re-examination of the Prologue

    Hey @ravenous reader Awesome OP, great work as always. I love how nicely this works with the archetypal struggle of brother v brother in the series highlighted in @Crowfoods Daughter's essay, and your breakdown of how the mocking and counter-mocking plays into this and ultimately has a deciding factor in the poetic justice handed out is superb. Having studied the prologue with yourself and Evita previously in the Bran’s Growing Powers thread this proves just how much progress has been made on this subject within the forum in the last year or so, a real collaborative effort, well done to those involved [Crowfoods Daughter, LmL and of course yourself] Without being able to add a great deal of detail, I particularly liked how you have tied in the warlocks as greenseer parallels enacting their poetic revenge for the slights made against them. All the while attempting to keep their hands clean by sending the Sorrowful Men to do their dirty work, it all fits rather nicely. Considering the tale of Mathos Mallarawan’s wife and the fact this example is one of a fate almost worse than death [the humiliation of having to go naked] it reminded me of Jaime and his mocking of Bran when he offered him help atop the Broken Tower. His cruel offer for Bran to ‘’Take my hand’’ only to push him to his [apparent] death certainly came back to haunt Jaime as more poetic justice is ‘handed’ out via him losing his sword hand, again a fate almost worse than death for the individual. Remembering a chat I had with Evita a while back there some other possibilities. In ADWD Hosteen Frey underestimates the cold of the northern winter and mocks the northmen’s respect for such climates. He also pays a high price….. Another character to suffer similar poetic justice is Weese, whose actions and threats towards Arya at Harrenhal come to fruition in his death….. After Jaqen had killed Weese, his spotted dog had ravaged his throat and face ripping mouthfuls of flesh from the dead man’s face in what seems to be more of this poetic revenge. Theon occasionally muses that ‘the old gods are listening’ and fears the words of those who mock them, and he is not alone. Lord Locke has similar thoughts and decides that in facing their wroth, they are all cursed. Great stuff RR, I shall return.
  7. POEMS (or other sundry quotes) that remind you of ASOIAF

    Thank you. The 'long delirious, burning blue' had me thinking of you and @Pain killer Jane regards the 'calling of the bloody blue'. And 'slipping' the bonds of earth to dance in the skies reminded me of Bran. I love this poem. Thank you for the link and Yeats poem as well, that's beautiful.
  8. POEMS (or other sundry quotes) that remind you of ASOIAF

    Hey everyone. There has been much discussion regards the mythological inspirations behind the Green men/greenseers in the series, including the Arthurian tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, amongst others. I stumbled across this beautiful poem when watching a documentary on Sir Gawain's journey, and thought it would fit right in here. A poem for Sir Gawain by Simon Armitage Time now to rise, to strike out with a clenched heart And no map bar the view from the peak Where the west wind pummels your cheeks, Leads with its granite fists. Days of rain, rain that permeates the bone Personal rain, persecuting the soul. Days when the promised lake Is a dishwater pond Wrung from a grey cloud onto a dead hill. Eat what the rook or crow leaves on its plate, Bed down where even the fox won't sleep. 'Til the wain narrows and halts And you wait in armour or anorak under the ridge With a campfire tan and hedgerow hair And a god looks down, silent Stoney faced, bearded with living moss This is the place. The journey over and the story told, The yarn at the end of its long green thread. Speak now, for all that you're worth, As the blade swoons in judgement Over your pretty head.
  9. Tyrion VIII, Dance 33 Hey LM That's interesting, what do you think it could mean/symbolise? Penny has brown hair and pinkish cheeks normally so she's not an albino, do you think it could hint at the other woods witch's abilities in line with your thoughts up thread? Or is she actually resembling a weirwood tree at this moment and why? Penny was described as weeping in the paragraph so I looked up weeping woman and Arya sees the statue of the Weeping woman of Lys next to the Lion of night [Tyrion?] in the HoBaW, but that feels more like a coincidence at this point. What you thinking my friend?
  10. What is Ghost?

    Agreed.
  11. Thanks RR. Hi @Unchained, cool thread and I love the Robb-tree-Grey 'Wind' link, great work. As RR mentioned I've recently stumbled upon some interesting information researching the hollow hills/Sidhe/wind connection. The godlike Tuatha De Dannan/Sidhe in Celtic myth are very much like our human greenseers, they were humans with supernatural powers, seers, shape-shifters and lived extremely long lives dwelling in their hollow hills. It was also said the Sidhe could inhabit the wind and be seen by passers by in the rustling leaves, an inhabited godlike or divine wind. In fact I think George is using the different meanings for the word Sidhe in Old Irish cleverly, all of which can be related to the old gods/CotF/greenseers and wind. I still have to research this further but here are some thoughts on the matter I posted in the Bran wind thread. Sidhe as hollow hills Searching the mythology of hollow hills I found they are directly linked to Celtic myth in that they are another name for the Sidhe [or Sidhe mounds] that the Tuatha De Dannan retreated into after invasion by the Milesians. We have only visited two hollow hills in the series, both associated with CotF and human greenseers, so I was pleased to note the other uses of the word Sidhe in connection to this... The Sidhe as CotF The Sidhe are also often thought of as the ‘Faery folk of the mounds’, or small people dressed in green living in their hills etc. There is obviously a connection to be made with the CotF here. However, the small faery or Fey image a lot of people have of the Sidhe isn’t always the case in Irish lore. The Sidhe as human greenseers The Sidhe of Irish myth [or the Tuatha De Dannan] were different in that they had gods living amongst them, human gods. These human gods had supernatural powers, lived extremely long lives but could still be killed as mortals, and they too also lived in the hollow hills. There are tales of these Sidhe being shapeshifters and seers as well. Again it seems reasonable to make a connection with the human greenseers in asoiaf. So the word Sidhe seems to be associated with the hollow hills, and alludes to the CotF and human greenseers, but it doesn’t stop there. In her awesome Brans powers thread @evita mgfs noted very early on that the word ‘gust’ seemed like a clue for us readers to look out for a presence in the wind. Sidhe meaning wind or gust The word Sídhe can also be translated in Old Irish as ‘wind or gust’ and the godlike Sidhe have much to do with the wind. They inhabit and journey in the whirling winds and when the country people see the leaves whirling on the road they bless themselves, because they believe the Sidhe to be passing by. Then of course there is George straight out comparing the Others to something like 'the Sidhe made of ice'. I shall return, it's late here. Cheers Unchained.
  12. Hi Isobel Harper. I love the Icarus connection. Adding to the wax, the structural element of the wings were made from branches of osier trees. Varieties of these willows such as the red osier, have tough, flexible twigs or branches that are used for 'wickerwork'. My thoughts instantly turned to Bran's wicker basket/wickerman connections. Great work @LmL Hey PKJ. If wax is probably connected to beeswax then perhaps all things 'honeycomb' are worth considering? The caverns/tunnels are honeycombed, currently home to Bran and potentially many greenseers from the past. The Eyrie and the House of Black and White are also described as having honeycombed passageways and lower levels. There are also quite a few references to people eating honeycomb in the text. Perhaps a link to be found? Talk of beekeepers, wax, honeycombs and the like reminds me of the 'Hive mind' we find in weirwoodnet, and some of George's other work. Anyway, I'm thinking out loud having just caught up. Really enjoyed this one @LmL, and thanks for the mention. [Love the pointy hill catch too ]
  13. BRAN’S GROWING POWERS AFTER his FINAL POV in ADwD

    I agree. Though slightly different in terms of research, the hollow hills and their Celtic influence is I think a good example of this, particularly with the old Gaelic word Sidhe. [Pronounced Shee or Shay] Old Irish has various meanings for the word Sidhe, all of which fit rather nicely into the Celtic angle of my hills essay. I of course started with the clue that Sidhe also meant hollow hills but the Celtic link grew with some research. Here’s a quick explanation… Sidhe as hollow hills Searching the mythology of hollow hills I found they are directly linked to Celtic myth in that they are another name for Sidhe [or Sidhe mounds]. We have only visited two hollow hills in the series, both associated with CotF and human greenseers, so I was pleased to note the other uses of the word Sidhe in connection to this... The Sidhe as CotF The Sidhe are often thought of as the ‘Faery folk of the mounds’, small people often dressed in green living in their hills etc. There is obviously a connection to be made with the CotF here. However, the small faery image a lot of people have isn’t always the case in Irish lore. The Sidhe as human greenseers The Sidhe of Irish myth [or the Tuatha De Dannan] were different in that they had gods living amongst them, human gods. These human gods had supernatural powers, lived extremely long lives but could still be killed as mortals, and they too also lived in the hollow hills. There are tales of these Sidhe being shapeshifters and seers as well. Again it seems reasonable to make a connection with the human greenseers in asoiaf. So the word Sidhe seems to be associated with the hollow hills, CotF and human greenseers, but it doesn’t stop there. This thread in particular has looked at the various powers of the greenseers, one such ability being controlling the wind. @evita mgfs noted very early on that the word ‘gust’ seemed like a clue for us readers to look out for a presence in the wind. Sidhe meaning wind or gust The word Sídhe can also be translated in Old Irish as ‘wind or gust’ and certainly the Sidhe have much to do with the wind. They journey in whirling winds and when old country people see the leaves whirling on the road they bless themselves, because they believe the Sidhe to be passing by. Celtic lore which seems to parallel the greenseers/CotF in their hollow hills inhabiting the whirling winds and rustling leaves etc, all from the ‘hollow hill/Sidhe link. Instantly Celtic mythology became more interesting than it was already for me. Ser Gendry of the Hollow Hill and the Gentry of Ireland Not bound to their hollow hills, the Sidhe were often called ‘the Gentry’ by the country folk on account of their tall, noble appearance and silvery sweet speech. The Gentry is one letter away from Gendry, who is of course tall and of noble appearance himself. Ser Gentry of the Hollow Hill. I’m a little unclear where this one fits in, but is a good example of how digging and following a potential pattern can have its rewards. I have my eye on Gendry and his link to the hollow hills moving forward. I'll stop here as there is plenty more to research, but if nothing else this continues to prove that George is weaving all these myths/inspirations into one big melting pot for us to research and enjoy. While one poster can say ‘this is Norse inspired’ another can claim some Celtic influence on the same subject, and so on. Most likely they would both be right, the joy for me is the journey and seeing how all these inspirations are masterfully pieced together. Hi @GloubieBoulga I too have enjoyed your posts on the forum, I join our resident raven in welcoming you to Bran's growing powers. As RR mentions, we're a friendly group and love to read anything Bran [especially thoughtful analysis ] We don't have a structure like a normal re-read thread, so feel free to post anything Bran/old gods related. Thanks GloubieBoulga. Haha You're a brave man LmL, those talons are sharp and the teeth sharper.
  14. BRAN’S GROWING POWERS AFTER his FINAL POV in ADwD

    Same here, great fun. Haha, 'tis true I've yet to really re-emerge from the hollow hills. I want to explore them thoroughly, and these tunnels go on for miles I'll have you know. Greywater Watch seems a good choice, and I do have green eyes. Our delay in finishing the series did lead to much punning, nennymoaning, and posting with naughty greenseers on your part, so every cloud and all that. Oh, and an awesome poetry thread. [Excuse me as I try to deflect my down-delvings] Nice, I like the ideas regarding Lady Forlorn and Widow’s Wail. In fact I looked at the word ‘wail’ for further clues as well. The Wailing Tower at Harrenhal was something I researched for my hills essay. Obviously the wind blowing through the fissures in the tower walls make that wailing sound, just the sort of thing we look out for here in the Bran re-read. But there are also said to be cavernous vaults situated beneath the Wailing Tower, just the sort of underground clues I was looking for. Nice catch with the ‘ragged’ and ‘shaggy’ connection. I agree there is a ghostly feel about Winterfell, the wind there is also described as having ‘ghostly fingers’, plus there are all those Stark ghosts roaming about of course. The hollow hills being attached to the Faeries/Sidhe is interesting in that respect as it’s said in Celtic legend that when they [the Fae, or the greenseers in this case] appear it can be in a gust of wind, and there is often a strange sound. That sound is normally like the humming of thousands of bees, but George could play with these inspirations if indeed this the case. The main point here is when the faeries appear it can be in the wind while also playing with sounds. Furthermore they can silence a mortal [normally one playing faery music] which reminded me of the three times a silence fell on the characters in the Prologue etc… Cool link with the black pond and the strange sounds at the House of Black and White too. Hmm, great point about the trees being the lungs of the Earth, the breathing, sighing, whistling, whispering, wailing, howling, singing and indeed speaking could therefore also be attributed to the trees as well as the wind. Thinking out loud, could that explain the windless night? Perhaps the stronger greenseers controlling the weirwoods might not need the wind to rustle their leaves, they can do it themselves, as they breathe/speak the leaves rustle and speech. I always thought it was George’s way of telling us that Bran has ultimate control over the tree, no wind necessary. The previous association with the wind enabling the voice via the rustling is cast aside and Bran takes charge of the tree, he speaks and the leaves rustle. [Bran seems like a particularly powerful greenseer, I think he is the embodiment of the tree at that moment] A sort of puppeteer as you have previously mentioned, going so far as to reach down and brush Theon’s brow with one of his many blood red hands. Perhaps this is the sort of power [and then some] that some of those First Men/naughty greenseers had? The ability to control creatures yes, but seemingly inanimate objects too such as rocks, trees, fire, water, or perhaps even comets and moons with amazing precision? The AGOT Prologue has wielded many a clue, but yes the words catching in the throat has baffled us. I mentioned the Sidhe/Fae’s tendencies to steal voices up thread, but more research needed. I agree that is something we could look at again in V.2. I love the 1-2-3 greenseeing nod as well, 'oh oh oh' how he loves his threes, great stuff. Love that quote!! I think it’s a good idea, really I have no clue what is down there [apart from having that hunch about a greenseer cave, throne and all]. Plus the Stark Kings and Lords have those swords to keep their souls from wandering, so why not be able to restrain a terrible presence in some way as well. The lower level being partly collapsed is interesting, is it partly collapsed yet still accessible [if not a little dangerous] or is it partly collapsed concealing the entrance to that level completely? If the latter applies then could that be an attempt to keep any spirits at bay? Basically blocking it on purpose. It would be similar to the ‘blocking stones’ we see in our real world barrows, equally in an attempt to keep the spirits in. Really interesting topic though. Thanks @ravenous reader for another awesome post and a reminder that we have much to sink our teeth into in the upcoming V.2 thread. Truly great work, again.
  15. Hi @Prof. Cecily and welcome to the forum. Thank you for your kind words as well, that means a lot, I'm really pleased you've enjoyed the thread. I'm sure you'll have a great time here, so many threads and good posters to sink your teeth into. Cheers Prof. Cecily