Quorra

Dogs

262 posts in this topic

On 5/12/2017 at 10:39 PM, Tears of Lys said:

My late, great, darling Bennie was (we think) a Ridgeback/Boxer mix. 

Boxers are probably my favorite breed, but I don't think I'd want to get another one immediately after Loki because I don't think it would be possible for the new dog to compare to him.  I'd rather get a different breed so I don't go into it with unfair expectations.  It's easy to forget what a little shit Loki was for the first year of his life because that was so long ago.  :lol:

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Pitbulls and Pugs are among the ugliest dogs in existience.

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On Invalid Date at 3:39 AM, Falcon2909 said:

Pitbulls and Pugs are among the ugliest dogs in existience.

I've heard tell that they don't think you're such great shakes either.  :lol:

 

As for the rescue groups requiring a fenced-in yard, yeah, it's great if you have it.  That said, I could have never kept Benny, since our yard's open to the woods, etc.  Instead, I took him for sometimes 2+ hour walks every day through woods and open fields.  We especially liked the "Hundred Acre Wood" that's near our house.  He found TONS of things to sniff and investigate.  Rarely, we'd meet another dog walking his owner through the woods, but when we did, it was always a great social event.  Ben got all the exercise he could stand.  I consider that a LOT better than being stuck alone in a yard. 

 

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My dog Lacy has finally gotten to the point where she is so used to the new kitten she'll allow the kitten to curl up next to her and sleep. Now if I only Lucipurr would quit attacking Lacy's tail when she wags it. 

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Posted (edited)

A local rescue does rehoming, fostering and adoption of racing greyhounds, so we're looking at options to train and adopt one. Not sure if we'll meet their criteria though. We only have a very small back yard, and would need to figure out where the dog would live when we're at work or whatever. In reality we're planning on dropping the dog at my wife's parents (which is on my way to work) when we're not in, same as we did for our last little guy. When we are at home they'll have access to our large fenced front yard, and we're looking at moving to (have already bought) a property with a big fenced yard in about a year.

But I'm doubting all that will fly as a solution in the eyes of the greyhound rescue. Still, big steps for my wife to even be considering this. Her best friend of near 17 years passed last September.

Edited by Impmk2

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On 5/15/2017 at 0:39 AM, Falcon2909 said:

Pitbulls and Pugs are among the ugliest dogs in existience.

Pugs are pretty unattractive.

They're also awesome as hell, at least so far. We rescued a 6-month old Pug from a family who couldn't keep her because of their two year old - the two year old was just not being nice to her. She is an absolute darling. She is rambunctious and playful and oddly fast, gets along with kids incredibly well, is super gentle, and is amazingly cuddly and sweet.

She also sounds almost precisely like Wicket the Ewok when she is playfighting, which makes her great. 

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My dog Sarge does this kind of low gravelly howl. He only does it when his beloved grandpa goes out somewhere, which is rarer and rarer these days. Sarge will look out the window, knocking aside the levolor blinds to see out and see he's gone. Then he'll sit in the middle of the floor, point his head up and let out this mournful "Ahhhhhoooooooh!!!" Like a wolf or coyote baying at the moon, if said wolf or coyote was hoarse in the throat. Only when his grandpa is gone will he do this.

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Posted (edited)

Quick question about peeing in the house.

New-to-me dog.  She's been with me a month.  Love her.  She's the best. She's house trained.  Except when it rains.  She can't stand to get her feet wet.  Nothing I've done will encourage her to pee outside if the grass is wet.  I've even staked a huge umbrella at the edge of the patio so she'd have a dry spot to use. Instead, she'll hold it and then find a way to sneak off to pee right next to the door.  I can't always be right on top of her.  She's not crate trained and I'm not sure I really want to bother with it.  I just finished un-crate training my other dog.  But I have carpet and so peeing on the floor is not good.  I'm wondering if there is anything else I can try.  I've considered a pee pad but I'm not sure if that would make things worse or not.  Has anyone dealt effectively with this?

Edited by Dr. Pepper

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21 minutes ago, Dr. Pepper said:

Quick question about peeing in the house.

New-to-me dog.  She's been with me a month.  Love her.  She's the best. She's house trained.  Except when it rains.  She can't stand to get her feet wet.  Nothing I've done will encourage her to pee outside if the grass is wet.  I've even staked a huge umbrella at the edge of the patio so she'd have a dry spot to use. Instead, she'll hold it and then find a way to sneak off to pee right next to the door.  I can't always be right on top of her.  She's not crate trained and I'm not sure I really want to bother with it.  I just finished un-crate training my other dog.  But I have carpet and so peeing on the floor is not good.  I'm wondering if there is anything else I can try.  I've considered a pee pad but I'm not sure if that would make things worse or not.  Has anyone dealt effectively with this?

Have you tried catching her in the act and yelling "NO!" loud enough to shock and scare her? I'm a big proponent of positive reinforcement with dogs, always praise, never hit, never scold after the fact, but in my experience a loud "NO!" while caught in the act helps.

Aside from that I'd say try the puppy pads. When I was house training my dog Winter when she was a puppy, I put pads all over the house and praised her when she did her business on them. Then it got to a point where I only had one or two pads on the floor and she knew to automatically go on them and no where else, after that she was trained to only go outside (with setbacks here and there, but she eventually got it).

With Winter she hated waking me up when she had to go in the middle of the night. I'd take her out before I'd go to bed, but then my dad would usually get up for a late night snack, feed Winnie table scraps, and then she'd drink water afterward. My dad would go back to bed and I'd wake up in the morning to find pee and poop in the kitchen. In the last few years with her though she finally "got it" and realized I wanted her to wake me up when she had to go, and that's what she did from then on and I always told her how good she was. I was never grumpy about having to take her out because it's a lot better than having to clean up inside the house, or worst of all, getting up when it's still dark and I'm tired and I step in it.

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1 minute ago, drawkcabi said:

Have you tried catching her in the act and yelling "NO!" loud enough to shock and scare her? I'm a big proponent of positive reinforcement with dogs, always praise, never hit, never scold after the fact, but in my experience a loud "NO!" while caught in the act helps.

Aside from that I'd say try the puppy pads. When I was house training my dog Winter when she was a puppy, I put pads all over the house and praised her when she did her business on them. Then it got to a point where I only had one or two pads on the floor and she knew to automatically go on them and no where else, after that she was trained to only go outside (with setbacks here and there, but she eventually got it).

With Winter she hated waking me up when she had to go in the middle of the night. I'd take her out before I'd go to bed, but then my dad would usually get up for a late night snack, feed Winnie table scraps, and then she'd drink water afterward. My dad would go back to bed and I'd wake up in the morning to find pee and poop in the kitchen. In the last few years with her though she finally "got it" and realized I wanted her to wake me up when she had to go, and that's what she did from then on and I always told her how good she was. I was never grumpy about having to take her out because it's a lot better than having to clean up inside the house, or worst of all, getting up when it's still dark and I'm tired and I step in it.

I haven't been able to catch her in the act unfortunately.  I think it could be that it's much like your Winter in that she'll sneak to pee when I can't possibly come find her to issue that loud NO.  Like tonight, she wouldn't get her precious paws wet so she hasn't peed and I keep taking her outside, but she just won't.  I'm tired and I need to be up early so it's a given that I'll be falling asleep soon and she will definitely pee on the carpet sometime tonight.  If I can just catch her doing it then I could start a good training plan.  She's 8 and has been housetrained for a while.  I was warned about the wet feet thing but didn't realize just how bad it would be.

I'll go ahead and try to pee pads.  I should be able to train her to go there should she need to go inside.

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31 minutes ago, Dr. Pepper said:

I haven't been able to catch her in the act unfortunately.  I think it could be that it's much like your Winter in that she'll sneak to pee when I can't possibly come find her to issue that loud NO.  Like tonight, she wouldn't get her precious paws wet so she hasn't peed and I keep taking her outside, but she just won't.  I'm tired and I need to be up early so it's a given that I'll be falling asleep soon and she will definitely pee on the carpet sometime tonight.  If I can just catch her doing it then I could start a good training plan.  She's 8 and has been housetrained for a while.  I was warned about the wet feet thing but didn't realize just how bad it would be.

I'll go ahead and try to pee pads.  I should be able to train her to go there should she need to go inside.

One other thing you might try is doggie booties. They'll keep her feet dry but she may still feel that even if her feet are protected she knows the grass is still wet and that's just something she doesn't do. I've never tried the booties with my dogs but my sister did with her Springer Spaniel "clown in a dog suit" pretty much describes what happened there. But I've heard that some people have had success with them.

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Why is it so hard to see your 12 year old female dog become slowly paralyzed with something none of your city's vets can detect (maybe it *was* just old age) and then carry her in your arms to have her put down which requires repeated injections and then bury her in front of her 10 year old mate :/ 

We can create physically unfeasible breeds of dog for visual purposes but we can't give them human-like long life? Pffff.

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2 hours ago, Dejection said:

Why is it so hard to see your 12 year old female dog become slowly paralyzed with something none of your city's vets can detect (maybe it *was* just old age) and then carry her in your arms to have her put down which requires repeated injections and then bury her in front of her 10 year old mate :/ 

We can create physically unfeasible breeds of dog for visual purposes but we can't give them human-like long life? Pffff.

 

It's hard because they are so easy to love and we love them so very much. :grouphug: 

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My dog snores so so loudly these days it sounds like he's snoring even when he's not asleep...think I might take him to the vet just to see if he's got a little air blockage or something 

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While my dad is at a doctor's appointment today, I was able to capture on video my dog Sarge baying for him, something he only ever does when his grandpa has gone somewhere and left him behind. I just think it's so cute and funny when he does this.

 

I ramble on a while about Sarge so I won't be offended if you only watch the first 30 seconds or so :P 

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I'm just curious, has anyone had to choose between kids or the dogs?  I never thought this decision would be so difficult.  Part of it is that these aren't my kids, at least not legally.  They are all just with me for (hopefully) a short time until they get to return to their own families.  But the dogs suffer quite a bit.  They don't get as much attention, they get treated roughly, they regress with their training.  Sometimes the rough treatment is so great that the dog lashes out and harms the child (so far nothing more than a scratch here or there).  The past few months I've had to keep the dogs completely separate from the kids if I'm not immediately there supervising (and sometimes even that's not enough).  

I've attempted to rehome one of my dogs once, but it was so painful that I backed out.  I just couldn't bear the thought of giving him away.  The second dog I don't really care that much about, someone literally just left her at my house, but it still feels terrible to get rid of her.  It also feels terrible keeping them when they aren't having the very best care possible.  I don't know when my current kids will leave.  I could probably wait it out for them to go before making a decision.  The decision is basically whether or not I will choose kids or the dogs.  I can't continue on as a foster parent if I keep the dogs but I can't imagine giving up either.

 If you've had to choose, how did you do it?

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Way to go California!

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/10/14/a-new-california-law-will-take-rescue-pets-from-shelters-to-stores/23243604/

Quote

 

California made history Friday by passing a law requiring all pet stores to sell rescue animals.

Taking effect in 2019, all dogs, cats and rabbits sold in California pet stores must be obtained from shelters, rescue groups or animal control agencies. For every animal in violation of the new law, pet store operators will be fined $500.

California Assembly Member Patrick O'Donnell said in an announcement: "This is a big win for our four-legged friends." He added that California taxpayers spend more than $250 million a year to house and euthanize animals in shelters. The new law could lower that expense.

 

 

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