Rhaenys_Targaryen

Small Questions v. 10105

2,356 posts in this topic

14 hours ago, Lost Melnibonean said:

Any ideas why Steffon Baratheon was unable to find a maid of noble birth from an old Valyrian bloodline in Volantis? There are noble families that can prove unbroken descent from Old Vayria. 

I apologise that I seem to have distracted from you inquiry. I hope I can help with this matter.

As we do not know many details we have to speculate but I can see Lord Steffon Baratheon wanting any potential bride having to fit three categories:

  1. The potential wife would have to be suitable for the future king of Westeros. For example she would need to be of the right age and beautiful enough.
  2. The family would need to be suitable for such a match as well. For example they would need to be a mighty noble family without major scandals that would reflect badly on the Targaryens.
  3. The family would have to be willing to give their daughter up. For example she could be betrothed to someone else and I can easily see some of the more major Volantis houses not wanting to marry their daughter to a Westerosi, I think I remember reading that a lot of Essos considers Westeros a backwards and uncivilised place, even to a prince.

With those in mind it is possible that there was no potential bride that fit all three categories but as I noted with how little information we have been given this is all purely speculation.

I hope this helps and I am sorry if it does not.

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21 minutes ago, Grazdan zo Azer said:

High Sparrow and High Septon chosen by Tyrion were elected with the same procedure?

I will try to answer this one. I apologise if I get it wrong.

They were probably both selected by the Most Devout but the Most Devout seem to be pliable and corrupt. Look at the Wheeling that is happening in book four after Tyrion's high Septon dies.

With this in mind I infer that Tyrion used both the money he has as a Lannister plus his political sway as acting Hand of the King to get the Most Devout to elect whoever he wanted. Cersei was likely aware of this, hence she thinks the High Septon is Tyrion's lackey.

I hope this helps and I am sorry if it does not.

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What is the military strenght of the great houses after the WO5K? . The Westerlands , North , Riverlands and Iron islands all lost many men during the war. 

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During the five-year gap, where was the George planning to park Tyrion, in Pentos, on the Shy Maid, or somewhere else? 

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George made another notablog post with that frog picture. Can someone remind me if the frog is supposed to indicate something or not?

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1 hour ago, Lost Melnibonean said:

During the five-year gap, where was the George planning to park Tyrion, in Pentos, on the Shy Maid, or somewhere else? 

Whre hunting :dunno:

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20 minutes ago, The Bard of Banefort said:

George made another notablog post with that frog picture. Can someone remind me if the frog is supposed to indicate something or not?

The frog was used for something big in the past (maybe ADWD announcement?) but he seems to use it off and on lately. 

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I remember he always used Froggy + riddle-like posts in connection to new castings on GoT... at least for the first 2/3 series.

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How far does the Wall's magic reach? Would the Others and the Army of the Dead be able to maneuver around it via water and just invade, say, Skagos?

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5 hours ago, Takyon said:

How far does the Wall's magic reach? Would the Others and the Army of the Dead be able to maneuver around it via water and just invade, say, Skagos?

Perhaps... Cotter Pyke reported dead things in the water. 

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Is ti possible connection between the Night's king and the last hero? Because as we see in the earlier seasons where G.RR Martin were involved in the series writing, the Night's king who brings the son of Craster and behind there is 12 companions similar to the last hero.

I can see this working out in the story if the Bran theory ( the one that he go to the past just to spread the stories , which in the end became legends ) is true.

Also what if Azor Ahai story is related just with Essos and actually the monsters what he was fighting it's the Valeryans, because in the modern time of Westeros they (Valeryans) are considered as humans, but what if in the early history they were the monsters to the people in Essos, because clearly they are nothing as the other humans, . And i read somewhere how Azor Ahai kill the monster and then the flames burst from inside him, it's looks as dragons, because why The Night's King or The others will burst in flames? The discription of killing them it's different;

And what if the prince that was promised it's totally another person, who actually was promised child with kings bloodline to the White Walkers , due their agreement after the long night ...     Hmmmm ....

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39 minutes ago, LadyBt said:

Is ti possible connection between the Night's king and the last hero? Because as we see in the earlier seasons where G.RR Martin were involved in the series writing, the Night's king who brings the son of Craster and behind there is 12 companions similar to the last hero.

I can see this working out in the story if the Bran theory ( the one that he go to the past just to spread the stories , which in the end became legends ) is true.

Also what if Azor Ahai story is related just with Essos and actually the monsters what he was fighting it's the Valeryans, because in the modern time of Westeros they (Valeryans) are considered as humans, but what if in the early history they were the monsters to the people in Essos, because clearly they are nothing as the other humans, . And i read somewhere how Azor Ahai kill the monster and then the flames burst from inside him, it's looks as dragons, because why The Night's King or The others will burst in flames? The discription of killing them it's different;

And what if the prince that was promised it's totally another person, who actually was promised child with kings bloodline to the White Walkers , due their agreement after the long night ...     Hmmmm ....

You are conflating the Night King of HBO's GOT with the legend of the Night's King in ASOIAF. We first hear about the legend of the Night's King when Bran et al. arrive at the Nightfort, when Bran recalls three legends, the Seventy-Nine Sentinels, the Night's King, and the Rat Cook.

"There are ghosts here," Bran said. Hodor had heard all the stories before, but Jojen might not have. "Old ghosts, from before the Old King, even before Aegon the Dragon, seventy-nine deserters who went south to be outlaws. One was Lord Ryswell's youngest son, so when they reached the barrowlands they sought shelter at his castle, but Lord Ryswell took them captive and returned them to the Nightfort. The Lord Commander had holes hewn in the top of the Wall and he put the deserters in them and sealed them up alive in the ice. They have spears and horns and they all face north. The seventy-nine sentinels, they're called. They left their posts in life, so in death their watch goes on forever. Years later, when Lord Ryswell was old and dying, he had himself carried to the Nightfort so he could take the black and stand beside his son. He'd sent him back to the Wall for honor's sake, but he loved him still, so he came to share his watch."

Bran IV, Storm 56

The tale of the Seventy-Nine (shouldn't that be nine and seventy?) Sentinels suggests that even one's family would not harbor a deserter from the Night's Watch. It also suggests that if you desert in life, your watch will not end in death. 

After The George gives us the tale of the seventy-nine sentinels, he gives us the tale of the Night's King...

Quote

The gathering gloom put Bran in mind of another of Old Nan’s stories, the tale of Night’s King. He had been the thirteenth man to lead the Night’s Watch, she said; a warrior who knew no fear. “And that was the fault in him,” she would add, “for all men must know fear.” A woman was his downfall; a woman glimpsed from atop the Wall, with skin as white as the moon and eyes like blue stars. Fearing nothing, he chased her and caught her and loved her, though her skin was cold as ice, and when he gave his seed to her he gave his soul as well.

He brought her back to the Nightfort and proclaimed her a queen and himself her king, and with strange sorceries he bound his Sworn Brothers to his will. For thirteen years they had ruled, Night’s King and his corpse queen, till finally the Stark of Winterfell and Joramun of the wildlings had joined to free the Watch from bondage. After his fall, when it was found he had been sacrificing to the Others, all records of Night’s King had been destroyed, his very name forbidden.

“Some say he was a Bolton,” Old Nan would always end. “Some say a Magnar out of Skagos, some say Umber, Flint, or Norrey. Some would have you think he was a Woodfoot, from them who ruled Bear Island before the ironmen came. He never was. He was a Stark, the brother of the man who brought him down.” She always pinched Bran on the nose then, he would never forget it. “He was a Stark of Winterfell, and who can say? Mayhaps his name was Brandon. Mayhaps he slept in this very bed in this very room.”

Bran IV, Storm 56

From this tale we see that a watchman set himself up as a king, with his seat at the Nightfort, after he had become ensorceled by a female Other. He sacrificed to the Others, presumably like Craster, and he was eventually brought down by the Lord of Stark and the King-Beyond-the-Wall. Old Nan suggests that there might have been a kinslaying element involved, but as the passage below suggests, this may have just been a flourish for young Bran's entertainment. 

Although the Night's King is referred to in passing a few more times, we don't learn anything else in the novels. Unlike the Seventy-Nine Sentinels and the Rat Cook, though, we get a little clarification in The World of Ice and Fire...

Quote

The oldest of these tales concern the legendary Night’s King, the thirteenth Lord Commander of the Night’s Watch, who was alleged to have bedded a sorceress pale as a corpse and declared himself a king. For thirteen years the Night’s King and his “corpse queen” ruled together, before King of Winter, Brandon the Breaker, (in alliance, it is said, with the King-Beyond-the-Wall, Joramun) brought them down. Thereafter, he obliterated the Night’s King’s very name from memory.

In the Citadel, the archmaesters largely dismiss these tales—though some allow that there may have been a Lord Commander who attempted to carve out a kingdom for himself in the earliest days of the Watch. Some suggest that perhaps the corpse queen was a woman of the Barrowlands, a daughter of the Barrow King who was then a power in his own right, and oft associated with graves. The Night’s King has been said to have been variously a Bolton, a Woodfoot, an Umber, a Flint, a Norrey, or even a Stark, depending on where the tale is told. Like all tales, it takes on the attributes that make it most appealing to those who tell it.

The World of Ice and Fire

The ASOIAF character that bears the strongest association to the Night’s King is King Stannis, who will claim the Nightfort as his royal seat soon after Bran recalls Old Nan's tale. He appears to have been ensorceled by a pale woman. And although we don't have a connection with the Others, he has sacrificed and made those shadowbabies, and he just might be fixing to sacrifice his daughter. 

After the the tale of the Night's King, The George gives us the tale of the Rat Cook...

Quote

The Rat Cook had cooked the son of the Andal king in a big pie with onions, carrots, mushrooms, lots of pepper and salt, a rasher of bacon, and a dark red Dornish wine. Then he served him to his father, who praised the taste and had a second slice. Afterward the gods transformed the cook into a monstrous white rat who could only eat his own young. He had roamed the Nightfort ever since, devouring his children, but still his hunger was not sated. "It was not for murder that the gods cursed him," Old Nan said, "nor for serving the Andal king his son in a pie. A man has a right to vengeance. But he slew a guest beneath his roof, and that the gods cannot forgive.

Bran IV, Strom 56

The story tells us that the gods cannot forgive a man who slays a guest beneath his roof, even if he has a right to vengeance. It also sets up Lord Wyman's Frey pies, and it suggests that Wyman will not be satisfied with Rhaegar, Symond, and Jared. 

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If a great house becomes extinct will a cadet branch take over? For example Lannisport Lannister replacing CR Lannister. 

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3 hours ago, Grazdan zo Azer said:

What is typical eye color for Greyjoys?

Black.

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2 hours ago, LordImp said:

If a great house becomes extinct will a cadet branch take over? For example Lannisport Lannister replacing CR Lannister. 

Situation dictates. In the end, the king would decide, based on several factors, such as whether there is a recognized heir, like Harry Harding for Arryn, what do the most powerful bannermen want and what will they accept. 

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9 hours ago, Grazdan zo Azer said:

What is typical eye color for Greyjoys?

Aeron - "Tall and thin, with fierce black eyes and a beak of a nose, the priest was garbed in mottled robes of green and grey and blue, the swirling colors of the Drowned God."

Asha - "That amused her; he could see the sparkle in her dark eyes."

Balon - "His eyes were flinty too, black and sharp, but the years and the salt winds had turned his hair the grey of a winter sea, flecked with whitecaps."

Euron - "A black leather patch covered Euron's left eye, but his right was blue as a summer sky."

Theon - his face is described as dark a few times in AGOT

Victarion - ?

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I have a quick question - is someone aware of textual evidence (from either the 5 books or the worldbook) which explicitly states that the three headed dragon on the Targaryen sigil was meant to represent Aegon and his sisters?

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24 minutes ago, TheCrannogDweller said:

I have a quick question - is someone aware of textual evidence (from either the 5 books or the worldbook) which explicitly states that the three headed dragon on the Targaryen sigil was meant to represent Aegon and his sisters?

Possibly ACOK Daenerys V

Quote

"But there are no three-headed dragons."

"The three heads were Aegon and his sisters."

"Visenya and Rhaenys," she recalled. "I am descended from Aegon and Rhaenys through their son Aenys and their grandson Jaehaerys."

or ASOS Daenerys I

Quote

"Your Grace," he conceded, "the dragon has three heads, remember? You have wondered at that, ever since you heard it from the warlocks in the House of Dust. Well, here's your meaning: Balerion, Meraxes, and Vhagar, ridden by Aegon, Rhaenys, and Visenya. The three-headed dragon of House Targaryen—three dragons, and three riders."

 

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I think it is time for me to try another question.

It is in the same chapter as my previous question, when King Robb Stark executes Lord Rickard Karstark. The question is about Robb hanging the Karstark men rather than executing them himself. This seems to go against the philosophy of "the who passes the sentence should swing the sword". This is particularly jarring as in the same chapter Robb chooses to decapitate Rickard himself for that very reason. Does anyone have any in universe reason behind Robb's actions here?

I thank you for your time.

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