LadySaeryn

What Made Valyrians Dragonlords?

36 posts in this topic

On 3/29/2016 at 10:55 PM, The Dragon has three heads said:

Genetic engineering through technology now lost, or more traditional fantasy(and there for, bleh) a blood binding type ceremony.

i have this feeling the GEOTD and asshaii were far more advanced civilisations than the ones we have now.

 

On 3/29/2016 at 11:08 PM, The Dragon has three heads said:

Some good bits in there.

 

the magic vs tech debate is a goodin'

psyonics and latent tech instead of magic is where it's at I think.

I have not read GRRM other stuff yet. ..but

so what your saying or maybe what I am hearing and making up in my head is...

     that when they said the Valyrians were shepherds, that was how the info had been passed in error over time. The original Valyrians were the sheep, or maybe more like guinea pigs to Asshai?  and this was the reason behind their unusual looks and high percentage of unstable personalities....40 test subjects or more, just 40 survived and became viable?

 

 

 

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On 31 March 2016 at 11:18 AM, Dizzy Walker said:

 

I have not read GRRM other stuff yet. ..but

so what your saying or maybe what I am hearing and making up in my head is...

     that when they said the Valyrians were shepherds, that was how the info had been passed in error over time. The original Valyrians were the sheep, or maybe more like guinea pigs to Asshai?  and this was the reason behind their unusual looks and high percentage of unstable personalities....40 test subjects or more, just 40 survived and became viable?

 

 

 

Of all the pseudo theories I've heard this is not that out there! haha

I think the GEOTD and Asshai were maybe enemies at the time and maybe "grew" the valyrians as a weapon, who became their own empire.  Probably similar to what the COTF did with the Others...but hey, at this stage anything and nothing is possible.


 

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"Dragons are fire made flesh" looks to me like one of those grand metaphorical expressions that pointedly convey a literal message. That is, fire magic (the transmutation of the hottest flame on earth, volcanic lava, into something living) might be at the root of the creation of dragons, and fire magic to me just seems to be a type of blood magic (rather than they being separate categories of magic), because every magic comes down to sacrifice (blood). So, this is basically simply a world where, ultimately, human sacrifice can actually work as intended (unlike our world). If the initial magical ritual we're talking about here involved blood/human sacrifice (because that's just what big magic is) and the outcome was "fire made flesh", and the dragons thus created have a blood-specific connection to certain humans, then it might be that:

A human was sacrificed so that someone of their blood could obtain a fiery weapon of untold power.

That's of course also the story of the forging of Lightbringer. In fact, given that dragons are the ultimate weapon, it may be that all these archetypal "sacrifice->weapon" stories (including AA himself) are in fact referring back to the big one that started it all - the creation of the first dragon. 

This might have happened only once, by the first dragonlords, or once again by the Valyrians - this bit is actually less important than the how of it. The dragons roosting beneath the Shadow today may be the feral descendants of the dragons of the first dragonlords (of Ashai?).

I'm also not sure firewyrms are what we think they are. The knowledge of them could be garbled (and not like anyone is going to go check right now, yes?). For example, this could be a confusion due to a literal translation of a metaphor referring to lava explosions / bursts of flame from the rock in Valyrian mines, which happened as you dug deeper into a volcano. Unlike wyverns which seem to be pretty well documented from what Yandel says about them, I put a question mark over what firewyrms are. Which might of course undercut any cross-breeding theory, in keeping with my preference for the purely magical origin of dragons.

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GRRM laid evidence that the Valyrian phenotype is not uniquely their own. House Dayne has similar looks, and a Reach woman is possibly the reason the Targaryens were able to hatch more dragons. Speaking of House Dayne, how in the shit have they retained their phenotype?! Importing wives and husbands? Or did sorcery keep their traits dominant?

Another theory is that when they first discovered the dragons, originally they couldn't hatch them away from the fourteen flames, only tame them. Then over time, with sorcery, found a way to increase that genetic link and be able to hatch them regardless of the flames. I'm going with Preston Jacob's theory of genetics, with men capable of being Dragonriders, but Dragonmothers the only ones capable of actually hatching them. With two X Chromosomes, special ones at that, necessary to hatch dragons, inbreeding and selective marriages would be powerfully selected for. I wouldn't be surprised if an informal law in Valyria was that a Dragon riding/hatching woman was only ever wed to a Dragonriding man. Possibly vice versa, with Valyrians without the particular chromosome a slightly lesser underclass, only capable of gaining it through bastardry. And even then, with two DragonX Chromosomes required to hatch and only one to ride, there may have been marriages that resulted in some or none of the children of a couple with only one of the proper X chromosomes present in the couple.

So the actual genetic stock of Dragonlords would have remained narrow and small, even while ethnic Valyrians themselves expanded. Which handily explains how Essos can still have an apparently large amount of pure Valyrian stock left, but virtually no Dragonlord genetics. Or else the Free Cities would have raised their own dragons even after the Doom.

This would also explain why the Targaryen's were heavily into incest, but it isn't necessarily common(outside of cousin fucking but that's different than generational sibling fucking) of the rest of the ethnic Valyrians. Because of heavy selective pressure.

 

So some hillbilly shepherd discovers dragons. Some time later, another hillbilly manages to tame one, has a bunch of kids. Because a dragon means the answer is always yes. Some more country bros also acquire dragons, and people starting fighting with them. Eventually somebody has a clutch of eggs around, and a few of them hatch away from the fires. Marriages abound, and people with dragons start severe ingroup selection of other dragonriders, and forcing all of their children to try to tame or raise a dragon. Failures get burned and eaten, successes get marriages. But eventually some family has a bunch of kids, and ALL of them successfully ride dragons and they are the only family to boast this. Incest abounds with the spares married off....or try to steal a bride/husband. All in all in would be centuries of fratricide and wars before they had a decent number of Dragonmother women.

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On 11 April 2016 at 2:16 AM, Vashon said:

GRRM laid evidence that the Valyrian phenotype is not uniquely their own. House Dayne has similar looks, and a Reach woman is possibly the reason the Targaryens were able to hatch more dragons. Speaking of House Dayne, how in the shit have they retained their phenotype?! Importing wives and husbands? Or did sorcery keep their traits dominant?

Another theory is that when they first discovered the dragons, originally they couldn't hatch them away from the fourteen flames, only tame them. Then over time, with sorcery, found a way to increase that genetic link and be able to hatch them regardless of the flames. I'm going with Preston Jacob's theory of genetics, with men capable of being Dragonriders, but Dragonmothers the only ones capable of actually hatching them. With two X Chromosomes, special ones at that, necessary to hatch dragons, inbreeding and selective marriages would be powerfully selected for. I wouldn't be surprised if an informal law in Valyria was that a Dragon riding/hatching woman was only ever wed to a Dragonriding man. Possibly vice versa, with Valyrians without the particular chromosome a slightly lesser underclass, only capable of gaining it through bastardry. And even then, with two DragonX Chromosomes required to hatch and only one to ride, there may have been marriages that resulted in some or none of the children of a couple with only one of the proper X chromosomes present in the couple.

So the actual genetic stock of Dragonlords would have remained narrow and small, even while ethnic Valyrians themselves expanded. Which handily explains how Essos can still have an apparently large amount of pure Valyrian stock left, but virtually no Dragonlord genetics. Or else the Free Cities would have raised their own dragons even after the Doom.

This would also explain why the Targaryen's were heavily into incest, but it isn't necessarily common(outside of cousin fucking but that's different than generational sibling fucking) of the rest of the ethnic Valyrians. Because of heavy selective pressure.

 

So some hillbilly shepherd discovers dragons. Some time later, another hillbilly manages to tame one, has a bunch of kids. Because a dragon means the answer is always yes. Some more country bros also acquire dragons, and people starting fighting with them. Eventually somebody has a clutch of eggs around, and a few of them hatch away from the fires. Marriages abound, and people with dragons start severe ingroup selection of other dragonriders, and forcing all of their children to try to tame or raise a dragon. Failures get burned and eaten, successes get marriages. But eventually some family has a bunch of kids, and ALL of them successfully ride dragons and they are the only family to boast this. Incest abounds with the spares married off....or try to steal a bride/husband. All in all in would be centuries of fratricide and wars before they had a decent number of Dragonmother women.

I doubt "shepherds" were the ones to gain anything, except maybe a boot on their neck from their noble overlords.

These early dragons and their riders simply would not have survived with all the myriad kingdoms and veracious lords around the land of the long summer. 

The early dragon lords had to have somewhere to retreat too and or defend.  This in turn leads me to believe that the noble dragon riding or future dragon riding class was imported from somewhere else, and came to the 14 flames, as opposed to being 'from' there.

obvioulsy this doesn't mean they are aliens or even genetically bred, but, given the double dragon X Theory at some point those whom tamed the first dragons realized hatching more was possible.

as a process of trial and error this would take generations and an insane amount of luck, possible, yes, but given what we know of GRRMs world highly unlikely I think.

plus the Valyrians as shepherds gets repeated enough times for me to take it with a pinch of salt.

 

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I like to think that the original shepherds were not in the area of the Fourteen Flames by mere accident. 

A lot of the various tribes/cultures in Essos seem to have some ancestry from the far east, at least going by some of what the world book suggests. Over the eons since they migrated west most of these groups forgot their origins, that they were once part of the Great Empire of the Dawn (where the use of or involvement of dragons is hinted at). But some small minority groups may have remembered.

So my theory is that some wandering mystic/group (who perhaps remembers that the Valyrians have links to what used to exist in the far east) meets a group of Valyrian shepherds and suggests they go looking in the Fourteen Flames for riches or treasure or whatever. Maybe they want the Valyrians to go there to learn their true heritage, in the same way Bloodraven guides Bran to the north of The Wall. Once there they find dragons and with the guidance of said mystic they develop their new culture. 
Perhaps these mystic wants to use the shepherds for his own nefarious purposes, or perhaps they think the world needs a replacement for the Great Empire, something they longs to see rise again.

That's all pure speculation but I like to think that not everything from the GEotD was lost (as perhaps it should have been), and maybe some of it found its way into influencing the newly developing cultures of the rest of Essos long after the cataclysm that wiped it out.
I think whatever happened all those eons ago in the far east has had long reaching consequences and is still affecting the world today.

 

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12 hours ago, The Dragon has three heads said:

I doubt "shepherds" were the ones to gain anything, except maybe a boot on their neck from their noble overlords.

These early dragons and their riders simply would not have survived with all the myriad kingdoms and veracious lords around the land of the long summer. 

The early dragon lords had to have somewhere to retreat too and or defend.  This in turn leads me to believe that the noble dragon riding or future dragon riding class was imported from somewhere else, and came to the 14 flames, as opposed to being 'from' there.

obvioulsy this doesn't mean they are aliens or even genetically bred, but, given the double dragon X Theory at some point those whom tamed the first dragons realized hatching more was possible.

as a process of trial and error this would take generations and an insane amount of luck, possible, yes, but given what we know of GRRMs world highly unlikely I think.

plus the Valyrians as shepherds gets repeated enough times for me to take it with a pinch of salt.

 

I think the first thing the original Valyrian Dragon riders was either tame are slaughter all the wild dragons and drive them off. Otherwise, wild dragons with no connections to the Valyrians would still be flying around.

 

Although I concede your theory has merit. What with the Valyrian phenotype being at Starfall and Oldtown, I don't think its a coincidence that the Valyrian outpost were largely seaborne or close to the sea, and I also don't think that the major Valyrian Wars being almost entirely based on naval access to the sea and rivers is a coincidence either. Its possible that earlier Dragonlords, or those who made themselves there enemies, founded both Oldtown and the Maesters and did so to be as far away as possible from the centers of power, likely Asshai.

 

Has GRRM ever cleared up why sailing West from Westeros just doesn't work?

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On 15 April 2016 at 3:57 AM, Vashon said:

I think the first thing the original Valyrian Dragon riders was either tame are slaughter all the wild dragons and drive them off. Otherwise, wild dragons with no connections to the Valyrians would still be flying around.

 

Although I concede your theory has merit. What with the Valyrian phenotype being at Starfall and Oldtown, I don't think its a coincidence that the Valyrian outpost were largely seaborne or close to the sea, and I also don't think that the major Valyrian Wars being almost entirely based on naval access to the sea and rivers is a coincidence either. Its possible that earlier Dragonlords, or those who made themselves there enemies, founded both Oldtown and the Maesters and did so to be as far away as possible from the centers of power, likely Asshai.

 

Has GRRM ever cleared up why sailing West from Westeros just doesn't work?

Haha of course not, that voyage is for Davos or Danny  I think ;)

What about shepherds in the non traditional meaning? Not literal sheep herds, but perhaps leading their people somewhere?  I think that's far more likely tbh

Edited by The Dragon has three heads

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My best take on the Valyrian origins (and all the "other" key origins and histories, as I believe they are inter-related) goes something like this...

(STRAP IN, THIS IS A LONG ONE)

Before The Long Night and even before the arrival of the First Men in Westeros, there was in the east of Essos the Empire of the Dawn. This was an empire of "Men" but they were men whom's blood was imbued with the power to harness Magic, magic of the planet, much like their counterparts in Westeros as the time, The Children of the Forrest. In attempting to not only build their civilization greater, larger, and more powerful, the Empire looked to increase it's powers in magic, as well as to expand via the usual conquest. Through their powers of magical prophecy, they divined that their were point in the world where the magic from the earth was far stronger, axis points of opposing elements, Ice and Fire. And so, the expansion and exploration of the Empire became tied to discovering these points and exploiting them. Religious beliefs began to spring up as a way of mythologizing and making sense of these strange forces and their continued experimentation and exploitation. Some demonized Fire magic as a corruption of life, and damned it's cost in "blood".  Some believed that Ice magic, which access points were scarce and far more remote from the center of the Empire, was the more holy, powerful, and desired permutation. But the proponents of Fire "won" out at the time when they bred the first Dragons (from Wyrms and Wyverns) in the city that became known as Assai. That ancient city grew, and dragon breeding, taming, and riding began to develop as a magical art. But the price in blood was high, and the ancient Men where few. The demand to expand and explore the opposite end of the elemental magic spectrum became increased in demand as well as other men to enslave and sacrifice for their existing Fire & Blood magic. Using their dragons as vehicles of flight, brave men and woman began to colonize the larger world, but in small outposts at a time. Through the magic of Obsidian candles, communication over distance was possible, and vital to the quest. Eventually Men of the Empire arrived in Westeros and made contact with The Children of the Forrest, becoming what were later confused as the "First Men." The Men of the Empire and Children were baffled by each other and their shared abilities in magic, but while the Children were in awe of the Dragons, they also had an ability the men did not, to skinchange and take control directly of the dragons. While the Men were threatened by this power, and abandoned or killed their own dragons as a result, the Children were enraged by the Men's use of Fire & Blood magic, which they saw as a perversion of the planet's natural magic, as well as Men's desire to seek the "Lands of Always Winter," which the Children had long protected and feared in reverence. This lead to war, and while the Children outnumbered the initial invaders from the Empire, the magic wielders, they were soon overwhelmed by the arrival en mass of the "First Men," the non-magic wielding slaves and thralls of the Empire, brought over via the Land Bridge of Dorne. The conflict went on for a century before the Children finally hit a "point of no return." After even destroying the land bridge in Dorne did not stop the spread of hostile Men, some of the Children believed that the solution to their problem lied in harnessing the very power they had forbidden and were originally protecting the Men from, Ice magic. While many of the Children held on to their opposition, "others" broke rank, and ascended into the Lands of Always Winter. In a reverse mirror of something that would follow back in the Men homeland of Assai, the "other" Children sacrificed scours of warm Men bodies to the cold, losing all blood, and the Children themselves morphed into "bloodless". They became The Others, the White Walkers. As unnatural as they had become, these Others could no longer reproduce by any means other than their magic. The dead men became their army, sacrifices to the cold their kin, and after decades of this process, a winter army including Ice spiders and Ice Dragons was born. But all this heavy use of Ice magic caused an eruption in the planet, and the Long Night began, a sudden season of Winter with no end and no sunlight.

The Men, now united in a common enemy with the opposing Children, formed The Pact, and resolved to abandon all magic but the magic of the Earth once the Long Night had been defeated, though in the meantime, any and all demonstration in Dragons and Fire/Blood magic became on the table again. Obsidian was made in mass, but the Long Night's magic and darkness had stopped the sorcerers of Assai and the rest of the empire from aiding or communicating through Obsidian. The most powerful in magical blood of the Men in Westeros was a purple eyed and silver haired warrior known as Azor Ahai, and on a battle where all was nearly lost, he sacrificed his love, a dark haired woman, Nisa Nisa, to create a sword stronger than any Obsidian, and imbued with the pure light of a star. With that sword, he and his army pushed the Others into total retreat, deep in the Lands of Always Winter. Azor Ahai died in the effort, but gave his sword to his eldest son, who was instructed to return it, along with his strong magic blooded wife, to the place of his birth; what would be known latter as Starfall in Dorne. With the Others "gone," legend was spread back through the working again Obsidian candles of the legend of Azor Ahai. But the Children demanded good on the promise be made by the surviving Men of Westeros, magical blood or not, and all Fire magic was forbidden. Azor Ahai's other children had taken on the darker traits of their mother, and they, alongside many more men built a castle in the north, which they called the Nightfort, and formed The Night's Watch (without a vow of no heirs), keeping eyes out for any further Other incursions. Though the Long Night had ended, winters around the world were growing longer still, and The Night's Watch was very aware. Despite working closely with the Children, even mastering their skinchanging ability, the decedents of Azor Ahai that remained in the North whom lead the Night's Watch, began to grow a little drunk with their powers, as they saw magic fade from other bloodlines. A man the legends would refer to as Brandon, sought out a place where Fire could perhaps be harnessed even amongst the snow, and built the castle of Winterfell with aide from Giants he controlled with his Skinchanging abilities. Brandon claimed himself King of the Winter, and left the Nightfort in possession of his heir. Brandon's heir, however began to seek another kind of power for his family, and yada yada yada (The Story of The Night's King), but this resolved itself in some major events (a second, much shorter Winter's War). 1) Brandon's heir was able to conceive a legitimate child with his Other bride, because of the fire magic still in his blood, giving birth to one son he did not sacrifice. It would be that surviving son that would carry on the Stark lineage after the Other's sacked Winterfell and killed the rest of the Stark line. 2) It resulted in the few surviving Children erecting the Wall in a defiant act of using Ice magic against their own enemy, and banishing Brandon's heir, aka the Night's King, to the other side of it along with his 12 "Children" and the rest of the Others. Beyond the Wall The Others could survive, but their magic was choked to the point of them quickly becoming too weak to be anything other than entirely dormant.

Meanwhile, in Assai... cutoff from Westeros, the sorcerers there attempted a massive fire magic ritual that mirrored what the Others had done with Ice, causing a disaster of volcanic eruptions around the world that would only be surpassed centuries later in the Doom. Only the most corrupted by the magic survived in Assai, and they to, like the Others, were now incapable of natural reproduction, and the lands surrounding Assai became the Shadowlands. The rising empire of Yi Ti, descended from the less magically lose of the Empire of the Dawn, those that learned the lesson from the Long Night, took the last of the obsidian building stone in all the world they could reach, and built the Five Forts, which like the Wall, acted as a magical truncate to prevent the spread of magical disaster by blocking the axis point of the original magic. And thus, Long Summers joined Long Winters, and a permanent cycle of nearly unpredictable, and un-survivable seasons began. Despite the truncates on magic's stronger points on the planet, it did not stop the activation of dormant Obsidian candles where they remained for those who had higher amounts of magic in their blood. Nomads descended from the magical peoples of the Dawn Empire finally discovered the Fourteen Flames, an axis point that the sorcerers of Assai had long since dreamed of harnessing. With some guidance of "prophets" using candles, the nomads eventually bred and tamed new dragons for the first time outside of The Shadow Lands. Over time, these "Valyrians," discovered that the key to ensuring maximum dragon hatching, and maximum dragon binding, was to inbreed (I subscribe to the double dragon X genetics theory).

When dragons arrived back in Westeros with the lone remaining Dragonlord Valyrian family, this magic caused Fire magic to grow in lands too close to The Wall. The Wall's power very slowly began to weaken, and the Others became active again, though still restricted to the North side. The death of the Targaryen Dragons slowed down the process again, but it also signaled to The Others that the only force capable of destroying them was also dwindling fast.

I also think there is a deeper tragedy somewhere in all this theorizing (or FanFicing) and it's something I can't even begin to explain; something that complicates the need to destroy the Others. I think nature is about balance, and the real threat is the imbalance itself, as represented by the chaos in the seasons. Fire magic and Ice magic are both perversions of the planet's natural magic, while at the same time being intimately part of that nature via the axis points. And, magic itself is not inherently bad, as opposed to what The Maesters decided. The magic of the Children needs to return to the planet and heal it. But all magic requires some level of sacrifice, and its proportional.

Until then, we'll just dream of spring.

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My take..

So, Azor Ahai forged Lightbringer by plunging into his wife's heart to imbue it with power.. When this happened, Nissa Nissa let out a scream that cracked the moon..

Now.. the Dothraki have a story about the dragons spilling out from a second moon.. once it was cracked open.

Now, my personal speculation is that Azor Ahai was a contemporary of this Golden Empire of the Dawn.. backed up by the world book stating that the Empire of the Dawn came to an end when the Long Night started because of their hubris.

I think it went down like this; the GeoDawns had an opposite to the Heart of Winter, the Heart of Summer (this isn't my idea, but I ran with it). Their hubris refers to their mismanagement of this Heart of Summer, leading to it's exhaustion. Once it has been exhausted, the Others come in and bring the Long Night (or the Long Night comes and brings the Others?). After the War of the Dawn was won, the need to re-ignite this Heart of Summer would've been important.. but the Heart of Summer had turned into the wasteland known as the Shadowlands by now.. So, with the dragons called forth from Nissa Nissa's sacrifice (Lightbringer may not mean dragons.. it may be a sword.. it may mean dragons, doesn't matter for this discussion) the displaced GeoDawns move to a likely place to restart, Valyria. Here they use their great inherited power to practice blood magic to revive the dead Heart of Summer and bind their dragons, should the ice creatures ever return. I could go on and on about that, but I think that's where dragons came from. The sacrifice of Nissa Nissa brought them forth, and the settlement of Valyria probably required their binding.

My two cents..

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I think the story of Nettles taming Sheepstealer is a hint at how the Valyrians first tamed dragons.  Then, their magicians used blood magic to permanently bond the dragons to 24 (?) ruling families.  Thereby starting the Valyrian Freehold.  I also doubt incest was a common thing amongst dragon-riding families.  They just chose their marriages from within those select families.  The Targaryen's self-imposed exile required them to turn to incest as a way to keep their dragon-riding blood active.  Otherwise, if they diluted that blood too much they would have lost the ability to control dragons.

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1 hour ago, Belgarad said:

 I also doubt incest was a common thing amongst dragon-riding families.

Quote

The tradition amongst the Targaryens had always been to marry kin to kin. Wedding brother to sister was thought to be ideal. Failing that, a girl might wed an uncle, a cousin, or a nephew; a boy, a cousin, aunt, or niece. This practice went back to Old Valyria, where it was common amongst many of the ancient families, particularly those who bred and rode dragons. "The blood of the dragon must remain pure," the wisdom went. Some of the sorcerer princes also took more than one wife when it pleased them, though this was less common than incestuous marriage. In Valryia before the Doom, wise men wrote, a thousand gods were honored, but none were feared, so few dared to speak against these customs. (The World of Ice and Fire, Aenys I)

 

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Sacrifice. In the first instance. Bonding by blood. Akin to skinchanging, but it's a one way ticket, the cost to get in is death, burning. Looser than straight skinchanging, like how Bloodraven describes skinchangers having left imprints in the animal, it's there but it's not dominant, not conscious, like an echo. It's like how skinchangers can lose themselves in the animal. The fire simply devours most that person inside the dragon's conscious, but some traces remain, and those traces recognise family, blood.

Drogon is Drogo.

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On 4 May 2016 at 8:33 AM, chrisdaw said:

Sacrifice. In the first instance. Bonding by blood. Akin to skinchanging, but it's a one way ticket, the cost to get in is death, burning. Looser than straight skinchanging, like how Bloodraven describes skinchangers having left imprints in the animal, it's there but it's not dominant, not conscious, like an echo. It's like how skinchangers can lose themselves in the animal. The fire simply devours most that person inside the dragon's conscious, but some traces remain, and those traces recognise family, blood.

Drogon is Drogo.

I think for older dragons absolutely they would have fragments of their older riders left inside them.  As for drogon being drogo, perhaps there is some of him in there, but he was already dead it was Mirri's life that paid for theirs(or perhaps Rhaego's).

 

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Drogo lost his soul, his fire, empty he sat following the sun, yearning. We get the story in the previous chapters, the dragons got their fire by drinking the sun. My sun and stars. Drogon is a free spirit, won't be chained, lives to wander far, like the Khalasar lead by its Khal wanders the Dothraki sea. The fiercer a Khal in life the brighter his star in death.

They Valyrians blood sacrificed their blood, family members, to the flames or for the dragon to eat, and the dragons became less hostile to members of the sacrifice's family, a bond was established enough so that they could ride.

Drogon is Drogo. The mount for love. Until someone takes his place or joins with him in there. That person will be the mount to dread.

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