Lost Melnibonean

Wow, I never noticed that v.15

306 posts in this topic

On 4/2/2017 at 11:28 PM, PCK said:

Never noticed that Cersei was the last person in the capital to know of Tywin's death. It shows you how little respected she actually was even before the events of Feast.

Har!

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6 hours ago, rotting sea cow said:

According to the Qartheens the dragons comes from the moon. This was what Doreah told Dany back in AGOT.
 

Of course, Dany is "Moon-of my-life" for Drogo and he is  "Sun-and-stars" for Daenerys.

The second Moon already kissed the Sun and dragons returned.

You might appreciate this...

http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php?/topic/117219-moments-of-foreshadowing-10/&do=findComment&comment=7157443

Or not. 

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I never noticed how this convo between Ned and Rob about Lysa Arryn from Ned 1, GOT: 

Ned would sooner entrust a child to a pit viper than to Lord Tywin, but he left his doubts unspoken. Some old wounds never truly heal, and bleed again at the slightest word. “The wife has lost the husband,” he said carefully. “Perhaps the mother feared to lose the son. The boy is very young.” 

Could also describe Lyanna's feelings on her death bed. Or not.

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In ADWD in either Brans first or second chapter he fights a one eyed wolf while warged into Summer. In the prologue Varamyr Sixskins takes over a one eyed wolf just before he dies but had just thought that if he could live inside a direwolf then that would be a second life worthy of a king. So the fight was between Bran and Varamyr. 

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6 hours ago, KingMance said:

I never noticed how this convo between Ned and Rob about Lysa Arryn from Ned 1, GOT: 

Ned would sooner entrust a child to a pit viper than to Lord Tywin, but he left his doubts unspoken. Some old wounds never truly heal, and bleed again at the slightest word. “The wife has lost the husband,” he said carefully. “Perhaps the mother feared to lose the son. The boy is very young.” 

Could also describe Lyanna's feelings on her death bed. Or not.

The line you did not highlight has been used in support of Jon and/or Daenerys were raised in Dorne theories. 

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Posted (edited)

17 hours ago, KingMance said:

I never noticed how this convo between Ned and Rob about Lysa Arryn from Ned 1, GOT: 

Ned would sooner entrust a child to a pit viper than to Lord Tywin, but he left his doubts unspoken. Some old wounds never truly heal, and bleed again at the slightest word. “The wife has lost the husband,” he said carefully. “Perhaps the mother feared to lose the son. The boy is very young.” 

Could also describe Lyanna's feelings on her death bed. Or not.

And a little later on:

Quote

"I will take him as ward, if you wish," Ned said. "Lysa should consent to that. She and Catelyn were close as girls, and she would be welcome here as well."

"A generous offer, my friend," the king said, "but too late. Lord Tywin has already given his consent. Fostering the boy elsewhere would be a grievous affront to him."

"I have more concern for my nephew's welfare than I do for Lannister pride," Ned declared.

"That is because you do not sleep with a Lannister." Robert laughed, the sound rattling among the tombs and bouncing from the vaulted ceiling.

This line could also apply quite well to Jon Snow.

Edited by Shmedricko

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Sansa is properly referred to as a Lannister only 2 times in the series: both by Stannis to Jon’s face concerning the claim to Winterfell. After both references, the chapters end without much internal dialog from Jon. In both cases, Jon’s next POV chapter includes internal musings which contain the most vicious statements against the Lannisters over all of his chapters, condemnations which are missing elsewhere, even though we know he probably thought something similar especially after Ned's murder and the Red Wedding.

At the time of Jon I—Jon V, he believes that Sansa is his only surviving family. He doesn't find out about fArya until Jon VI and this is also when we find out that Jon believed up to this point that Arya died in King’s Landing with Ned.

ADWD Jon I: "By right Winterfell should go to my sister Sansa."
"
Lady Lannister, you mean? Are you so eager to see the Imp perched on your father's seat? I promise you, that will not happen whilst I live, Lord Snow."

ADWD Jon II: "At Winterfell, Tommen fought my brother Bran with wooden swords," Jon said, remembering. "He wore so much padding he looked like a stuffed goose. Bran knocked him to the ground." He went to the window and threw the shutters open. The air outside was cold and bracing, though the sky was a dull grey. "Yet Bran's dead, and pudgy pink-faced Tommen is sitting on the Iron Throne, with a crown nestled amongst his golden curls."
……..

"Well, he will not want it said that Stannis rode to the defense of the realm whilst King Tommen was playing with his toys. That would bring scorn down upon House Lannister."
"It's death and destruction I want to bring down upon House Lannister, not scorn." Jon read from the letter. "The Night's Watch takes no part in the wars of the Seven Kingdoms. Our oaths are sworn to the realm, and the realm now stands in dire peril. Stannis Baratheon aids us against our foes from beyond the Wall, though we are not his men …"

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

ADWD Jon IV: Jon said, "Winterfell belongs to my sister Sansa."
"I have heard all I need to hear of
Lady Lannister and her claim." The king set the cup aside. "You could bring the north to me. Your father's bannermen would rally to the son of Eddard Stark.

ADWD Jon V: "Fight for you?" This voice was thickly accented. Sigorn, the young Magnar of Thenn, spoke the Common Tongue haltingly at best. "Not fight for you. Kill you better. Kill all you."
The raven flapped its wings. "Kill, kill."
Sigorn's father, the old Magnar, had been crushed beneath the falling stair during his attack on Castle Black.
I would feel the same if someone asked me to make common cause with the Lannisters, Jon told himself.

 

Stannis’ “Lady Lannister” is rubbing it in Jon’s face that the only family he currently believes to be alive is forever lost to him. Jon’s refusal to take Winterfell isn’t just because he’s being a nice guy, it’s in hopes that he’ll have the last of his family back in his life. Jon gets on well with Tyrion, Tyrion isn’t so fond of Tywin, so it’s probably a hope that he’s been clinging to for some time.

Jon’s acceptance of Winterfell is to give up hope of any family back in his life. Stannis’ “Lady Lannister” is crushing Jon’s hopes of Tyrion taking Winterfell and Sansa coming back home. Jon is realizing that all of his family is forever lost to him, even though he knows Sansa is still alive.  Hence Jon’s escalating hatred of the Lannisters.

On reread, the loneliness of Jon stands out throughout Dance. He thinks of home often, of his family. Jon VI: The great stronghold of House Stark was a scorched desolation. All my memories are poisoned. So when Jon gets news of fArya later in the same chapter, he's elated, it’s not just because he’s so close to Arya, it’s because he’d just given up hope of any family left thanks to Stannis. Arya represents renewed hope of not just having Arya back, but of renewed hope of not being alone in the world. I’m really not looking forward to reading about his finding out that she’s really Jeyne Poole.

 

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Posted (edited)

A Dance with Dragons - Tyrion VIII

The Selaesori Qhoran was a wallowing tub of five hundred tons, with a deep hold, high castles fore and aft, and a single mast between. At her forecastle stood a grotesque figurehead, some worm-eaten wooden eminence with a constipated look and a scroll tucked up under one arm. Tyrion had never seen an uglier ship. Her crew was no prettier. Her captain, a mean-mouthed, flinty, kettle-bellied man with close-set, greedy eyes, was a bad cyvasse player and a worse loser. Under him served four mates, freedmen all, and fifty slaves bound to the ship, each with a crude version of the cog's figurehead tattooed upon one cheek. No-Nose, the sailors liked to call Tyrion, no matter how many times he told them his name was Hugor Hill.
Three of the mates and more than three-quarters of the crew were fervent worshipers of the Lord of Light. Tyrion was less certain about the captain, who always emerged for the evening prayers but took no other part in them. But Moqorro was the true master of the Selaesori Qhoran, at least for this voyage.
"Lord of Light, bless your slave Moqorro, and light his way in the dark places of the world," the red priest boomed. "And defend your righteous slave Benerro. Grant him courage. Grant him wisdom. Fill his heart with fire."
 
Wow, I never noticed how this scene is very much like one of Jon's at the wall after Stannis arrives.
  • The captain emerging yet not taking place in prayers is a lot like Stannis and his slow loss of faith in Mel and her visions.
  • The captain also being mean-mouthed and flinty who is bad at playing the game of cyvasse (of Thrones).
  • Selaesori Qhoran = Queen Selyse. This goes right along with my idea that I laid out in my Nymeria thread that Mel uses ships as a euphemism for people/Free Folk.
  • Selyse is definitely the more crazy devout follower of Melisandre R'hollorism than Stannis is.
  • Moqorro is a slave, like Melisandre remembers about herself- Melony Lot 7. That raises some questions, doesn't it?
  • Filling hearts with fire is the sigil of Stannis under the influence of R'hollor/Mel when he changes the Baratheon sigil and puts the stag inside the fiery heart of R'hollor.
  • And Tyrion's description of the Selaesori Qhoran kinda matches how Val and some of the guys at Castle Black, and well, everyone describes Queen Selyse.
  • I think Melisandre and Selyse together is the Jon version of the perfumed seneschal. Mel is known for her spicy scents that accompany her spells, and Selyse is well, Selyse the follower/steward/agent.

Soooo, if Daenerys is told to beware the perfumed seneschal- which literally translates to fragrant steward, and the Selaesori Qhoran is called the Stinky Steward, which translates to Queen Selyse, then by reason of foreshadowing (;)) Jon should avoid Queen Selyse because she will bring destruction on him??? Got it!

...HOLD THE CAN OF WORMS....

Wasn't little Dany followed by hired knives as a child? Well, who hired the knives at Castle Black for the mutiny to kill the boy? Remember, half of the stabbers were acting weird and crying and saying, "not me."

Were they under a spell? Hired? By whom?

Edited by The Fattest Leech
Always with the bad spelling, I am.

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Ser Jorah produced his pair of gloves, and slapped them down on the table beside the other gifts the widow had received this morning: a silver goblet, an ornate fan carved of jade leaves so thin they were translucent, and an ancient bronze dagger marked with runes. Beside such treasures the gloves looked cheap and tawdry.

- Tyrion VII, ADWD

Where did I see that dagger before?

Ah, here

Quote

Mirri Maz Duur chanted words in a tongue that Dany did not know, and a knife appeared in her hand. Dany never saw where it came from. It looked old; hammered red bronze, leaf-shaped, its blade covered with ancient glyphs.

- Daenerys VIII, AGOT

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My queen, your champion stands ready. There is no man in all the Seven Kingdoms who can hope to stand against him. If you will only give the command . . ."

- Cersei X, AFFC

That sounds strangely Eowyn-ish

Specially if you consider

Quote

I dreamt of a maid at a feast with purple serpents in her hair, venom dripping from their fangs. And later I dreamt that maid again, slaying a savage giant in a castle built of snow

- Arya VIII, ASOS

Sansa will slay Robert Strong. Somehow.

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5 minutes ago, rotting sea cow said:

- Cersei X, AFFC

That sounds strangely Eowyn-ish

Specially if you consider

- Arya VIII, ASOS

Sansa will slay Robert Strong. Somehow.

Nice! 

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1 hour ago, rotting sea cow said:

- Cersei X, AFFC

That sounds strangely Eowyn-ish

Specially if you consider

- Arya VIII, ASOS

Sansa will slay Robert Strong. Somehow.

No man = no one, truly. 

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12 hours ago, rotting sea cow said:

- Tyrion VII, ADWD

Where did I see that dagger before?

Ah, here

- Daenerys VIII, AGOT

Also note the silver goblet - the only silver goblet not directly associated with the Starks (Although Tobho Mott owns the ones he uses to have a drink with Eddard, we know Eddard has his own silver goblets decorated with direwolves - Bran drinks from one of his father's at the Harvest feast. At Riverrun, Catelyn toys with a silver goblet as she listens to Rymund the Rhymer.  And poor Jeyne Poole clutches one at her wedding feast at Winterfell. Probably a Stark direwolf one, although Ramsey drinks from his father's goblet, which could mean that Roose brought goblets (or a goblet) with him, or merely that Ramsey has taken over the cup set for his father, which is actually Winterfell silver.

There are a few silver cups. Lysa offers her a silver cup of Lord Hunter's orange wine on the day of Tyrion's judgement, and after Lysa dies, Petyr and Nestor Royce drink Arbor Gold in the Eyrie's silver cups, and the Lords Declarant have mulled wine from the same. They are engraved, although with what we know not.

Lady Stark notes that Renly has some silver cups, matched ones, although there is no mention of them being engraved. Euron drinks from a silver cup in Lord Hewetts bedchamber on Oakenshield, although Ser Harras Harlaw is drinking from a golden cup in the hall at the same feast. The Elder Brother has found silver cups in the waters of the bay, although they drink from unmatched driftwood cups as he tells them of the river's gifts. 

Donal Noye had a single silver drinking cup, perhaps the one Jon leaves on the forge. The Freys cups clatter, hinting they are made of wood. The wildlings have niello cups and golden goblets among their treasures. Sometimes there is no distinction between a cup and a goblet.

There are some generic goblets: Jaime drinks from one at his second trip to Harrenhal, and at Castle Hayford on the way there. With Bolton, on his first trip to Harrenhal as well. Tyrion poured Yezzen's wine into one for Ben Plumm. There were golden goblets at Tommen's wedding, Petyr had generic goblets on the Merling King, Xaro has goblets in his manse. The Tickler obtained a dented goblet with garnets set on it, King Robert drank from a jewelled goblet at the feast of the Hand's Tourney, and of course, Joffrey had that monstrous jewelled goblet at his wedding.

The goblets of the Merchant's house are made of green glass.  Also, while there are many places that use jade, flakes of jade seem to be a Qartheen speciality.  The widow's gifts are all of them quite interesting.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Walda said:

Also note the silver goblet - the only silver goblet not directly associated with the Starks (Although Tobho Mott owns the ones he uses to have a drink with Eddard, we know Eddard has his own silver goblets decorated with direwolves - Bran drinks from one of his father's at the Harvest feast. At Riverrun, Catelyn toys with a silver goblet as she listens to Rymund the Rhymer.  And poor Jeyne Poole clutches one at her wedding feast at Winterfell. Probably a Stark direwolf one, although Ramsey drinks from his father's goblet, which could mean that Roose brought goblets (or a goblet) with him, or merely that Ramsey has taken over the cup set for his father, which is actually Winterfell silver.

(...)

Note that the silver goblet in Europe is a current (and very old) gift for the birth or baptism. It is associated with precious jewelry (pendants, bracelets...) and the more often the name of the new born is carved. In noble families, the arms/sigils/words of the family are carved with. It is a concrete manner to link the baby to the lineage, and continue the family.

So the Stark silver goblet has probably the signification of belonging a lineage, a particular blood.

Offering a cup to Joffrey significates a re-birth (a new area for the realm where the Reach and the Tyrell are at the first place, for example ^^), here very ironic because the poison will be in the cup at the end. But perhaps the silver gobelet of the Stark is "metaphoricaly" poisoned too 

 

Edited by GloubieBoulga

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3 hours ago, Walda said:

Also note the silver goblet - the only silver goblet not directly associated with the Starks (Although Tobho Mott owns the ones he uses to have a drink with Eddard, we know Eddard has his own silver goblets decorated with direwolves - Bran drinks from one of his father's at the Harvest feast. At Riverrun, Catelyn toys with a silver goblet as she listens to Rymund the Rhymer.  And poor Jeyne Poole clutches one at her wedding feast at Winterfell. Probably a Stark direwolf one, although Ramsey drinks from his father's goblet, which could mean that Roose brought goblets (or a goblet) with him, or merely that Ramsey has taken over the cup set for his father, which is actually Winterfell silver.

. . .

The widow's gifts are all of them quite interesting.

Fascinating. I had looked at wedding gifts and what they might represent, but never took a close look at the entire collection of gifts before the Widow, or really recognized that they had all been given to her that day. @rotting sea cow nice catch on the dagger with glyphs - I had searched for weapons with runes, but never thought to look for other types of writing on blades.

Ser Jorah produced his pair of gloves, and slapped them down on the table beside the other gifts the widow had received this morning: a silver goblet, an ornate fan carved of jade leaves so thin they were translucent, and an ancient bronze dagger marked with runes. Beside such treasures the gloves looked cheap and tawdry.

Gloves are really starting to interest me. I just did a close reading of the Arya POV from Clash of Kings where the "captive" northmen arrive with Vargo Hoat's raiding party. The "first man" in the line, whose sigil is a fist, is Lord Glover. So that glove could be a very strong symbol for First Men and the north. On the other hand (so to speak), Tywin wears a glove at the moment Joffrey dies. Why? Who wears a glove at a feast? And the AFFC prologue describes a lobstered steel gauntlet that held the prized key stolen by Pate. The Widow seems quite happy to have the gloves, even though they look "cheap and tawdry" to Tyrion's eyes. Ser Jorah gave books to Dany at her wedding, and she was happy to have those. (Those probably related to the words/swords symbolism.) How does Ser Jorah know how to choose such good gifts? Do the gloves represent skinchanging, allowing the Widow to cover up her old wrinkled hands? We know she is about to send Tyrion, Ser Jorah and Penny on a doomed ship that will take them to a fierce storm and slavers. Does Ser Jorah suspect what is on the horizon for the group, or is he not acknowledging a deeper meaning with his choice of gifts?

The silver direwolf goblet Bran uses at the harvest feast results in a symbolic death for him: appropriate, perhaps, for his symbolic role at the harvest feast. He grows tired, realizes he will never be able to dance, and Hodor carries him up to bed. (He had arrived at the feast on his horse, Dancer.) The symbolic death is also a symbolic bedding, which we have been told to expect during a Westeros wedding feast: instead of a bride, Hodor "goes to bed" with Bran, foreshadowing the "marriage of two minds" when Bran will skinchange into Hodor. They both see some smallfolk having sex in the hallway outside the Harvest Feast. Do all silver goblets represent an upcoming real or symbolic death for the person drinking? That certainly seems to apply for Joffrey. I believe it is Maester Cresson who tells us that the silver link on a maester's chain represents healing but that it also represents killing, or something like that. (I am not at home and can't access the books right now.) And then Maester Cresson drinks poisoned wine from a goblet.

If @rsc is right about the connection between the Mirri Maz Duur dagger and the Widow's dagger, does the Widow represent a magus? We suspect that Melisandre is hiding her wrinkles and her age behind some kind of magic - is the Widow a similar sort of priestess with a hidden past? In a recent discussion somewhere, I compared the Widow cutting away her tattooed tear to Arya deciding that she will not cry. Are there other Arya parallels? In a long ago discussion, I remember thinking that she was like Littlefinger and/or the Kindly Man, guiding one of our main protagonists as a sort of mentor figure. I guess maybe I should do a search and see if there has been a thread for her already. She seems to have a small role, but it's a juicy one.

Are the widow's gifts all symbols of death? If so, do they all apply to the arc of our current POV, Tyrion, or is she summarizing the goblet / Bran / Joffrey and dagger / Bran / Catspaw deaths we have seen? We haven't seen a fan associated with death, but the jade leaves could be a tree association. And a fan could symbolize wind and/or hiding a face behind something. Those have come up fairly often. Gloves, goblet, fan and dagger. Lots of possibilities here.

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17 hours ago, Seams said:

it is Maester Cresson

 

Quote

All the world knew that a maester forged his silver link when he learned the art of healing—but the world preferred to forget that men who knew how to heal also knew how to kill.

ACoK, Prologue

17 hours ago, Seams said:

the jade leaves could be a tree association. And a fan could symbolize wind and/or hiding a face behind something. Those have come up fairly often. Gloves, goblet, fan and dagger. Lots of possibilities here.

Indeed. I've looked at where various jade objects come from, and suspect there is a shared meaning for jade and other green things (eg. clothing, Green Grace, Renly, Tyroshi hair, Myrish liquor, Northern expression for inexperience, Velaryon, Ermesande etc) but these are new angles for me. Thanks for your insightful post.

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Just noticed this last night:

When Bran and the gang are first snoopin' around the Night Fort, Bran observes that a large thornbush (Thorne,) has grown up in the training yard.

I don't think there is anything significant about it, but it's a nice touch. 

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"Jon knew. The seed is strong, he told me. His last words. He kept saying Robert's name, and he grabbed my arm so hard he left marks. Tell them, the seed is strong. His seed. He wanted everyone to know what a good strong boy my baby was going to be."

(AGoT, Catelyn VI)

"You are Arya of Winterfell, daughter of the north. You told me you could be strong. You have the wolf blood in you."

"The wolf blood." Arya remembered now. "I'll be as strong as Robb."

(ACoK, Arya X)

She is stronger than I am.

The realization chilled him. Robert had been stronger than him, to be sure. The White Bull Gerold Hightwoer as well, in his heyday, and Ser Arthur Dayne. Amongst the living, Greatjon Umber was stronger, Strongboar of Crakehall most likely, both Cleganes for a certainty. The Mountain's strength was like nothing human.

(ASoS, Jaime III)

Robert had spindly arms and legs, a soft concave chest and little belly, and eyes that were always red and runny. He cannot help the way he is. He was born small and sickly. "You look very strong this morning, my lord." He loved to be told how strong he was.

(AFfC, Alayne II)

". . . you have six sons, my lord, not four."

"Once. Robert was my youngest and never strong. He died nine days ago, of a looseness of the bowels. Lucas was murdered at the Red Wedding. . . ."

(ADwD, Jaime I)

"Your Grace," He said, "it is so good to have you back. May I have the honor of presenting our newest member of the Kingsguard? This is Ser Robert Strong."

(ADwD, Cersei II)

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Posted (edited)

Are we supposed to compare Sweetrobin to Bran, Bloodraven or both? I noticed similarities when re-reading AFfC, Alayne II, in which Sansa and Sweetrobin (and Mya and Myranda and Maester Colemon) descend from the Eyrie. Elements of Bran's journey and the scenes in Bloodraven's cave seem to match with details of this Alayne POV.

All of the Eyrie is shut down in anticipation of the winter season, with windows closed and shuttered and furnishings covered. Robert's room is described as being particularly dark and cave-like, with Sansa having to find her way to a window by smell more than sight.

Robert Arryn is given a cup of sweetmilk to drink before descending, to help stop his shaking during the trip. This apparently has a toxic, residual effect as it "does not leave the flesh." Does this compare to Bran's bowl of weirwood paste? Discussion of the sweetmilk is immediately followed by discussion of a feast Robert will be attending, where Alayne says he should be given a second cup of sweetmilk. Perhaps the potion can be compared to the wine Bran drinks from his father's direwolf goblet at the Winterfell harvest feast.

Description of Bloodraven, from the wiki: "An albino, Brynden had milk white skin, long white hair, and red eyes. . . . He wore his white hair straight and to his shoulders, with the front brushed forward to cover his missing eye."

Description of Sweetrobin: ". . . a pasty boy with hair as long as any girl's. Robert had spindly arms and legs, a soft concave chest and little belly, and eyes that were always red and runny." The pale skin, long hair and red eyes are a match for Bloodraven. The "pasty" skin and "concave" chest may also allude to the weirwood paste and the cave of the CotF, and could link Robert to either Bran or Bloodraven.

Sweetrobin's voice is described as "reedy." Is this a link to the two Reeds who travel with Bran? Meera is the storyteller on the journey with Bran, and the reference to Sweetrobin's "reedy" voice is immediately followed by his wish that Sansa would read adventure tales to him.

This exchange made me think that Mya Stone might be a match for Jojen, who tries to get Bran to open his third eye:

"It will be warmer on the valley floor, my lord," said Mya. "You'll see when we get down there."

"I don't want to see," said Robert, but Mya paid no mind.

But this next detail led me to think that Mya might be part of the Bloodraven parallel:

"You almost fell."

"You're mistaken. I never fall." Mya's hair had tumbled across her cheek, hiding one eye.

Mya is the natural daughter of King Robert, as Bloodraven is the natural son of Aegon IV. And the hair hiding an eye is a hint from the author that we should be comparing them. Yet it's Bran who had a reputation for never falling (and fell only after being pushed by Jaime Lannister).

I know that GRRM doesn't necessarily offer a one-to-one connection when he uses the same symbols and details in two or more arcs - the message may be that the descent from the Eyrie is similar in some ways to the travel by Bran and his companions beyond the Wall. Bran is the POV in that case, so we have some insights into his transformation, but Meera, Jojen and Hodor might also feel changed by their ordeal. In this AFfC journey, Alayne/Sansa, Mya and even Myranda Royce might feel changed by their journey as well but the POV and her focus on Robert limit what the reader learns about Mya and Myranda.

Also in this chapter, and perhaps related: the Maester at the Eyrie is Maester Colemon. All of the dreams of lemon cakes and other lemon references lead me to assume that a Maester with lemon in his name must be important to Sansa's future. Colemon's claim to fame in ASOIAF is that his ministrations seemed to be saving Jon Arryn's life when he fell ill at King's Landing. Pycelle sent Colemon away and Arryn declined and died. Back at the Eyrie, Colemon cares for Robert Arryn, who suffers from a shaking sickness. He is alarmed that Alayne wants to dose Robert with sweetmilk, and the collusion between Littlefinger and Alayne does seem to harken to the poisoning plot of Littlefinger and Lysa against Jon Arryn.

At the beginning of this chapter, Robert throws a chamber pot of night soil at Colemon, who has to go off to wash and remove the mess. I think there may be wordplay in this about the descent from the mountain, and removing a bad scent, which could be called de-scent. Robert and Sansa both crave lemons in this chapter, so the restoration of a "lemon" scented Maester might be a good thing.

Edited by Seams

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