Lost Melnibonean

Wow, I never noticed that v.15

366 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Oops, I should have posted this in the foreshadowing thread...

We will see Dareon again...

Quote

 

Mance Rayder did not smile. "She burned you. "

"She burned the Lord of Bones."

Jon Snow turned to Melisandre. "What sorcery is this?"

"Call it what you will. Glamor, seeming, illusion. R'hllor is Lord of Light, Jon Snow, and it is given to his servants to weave with it, as others weave with thread."

Mance Rayder chuckled. "I had my doubts as well, Snow, but why not let her try? It was that, or let Stannis roast me."

"The bones help," said Melisandre. "The bones remember. The strongest glamors are built of such things. A dead man's boots, a hank of hair, a bag of fingerbones. With whispered words and prayer, a man's shadow can be drawn forth from such and draped about another like a cloak. The wearer's essence does not change, only his seeming."

 

Melisandre, Dance 31

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"Mummers change their faces with artifice," the kindly man was saying, "and sorcerers use glamors, weaving light and shadow and desire to make illusions that trick the eye. These arts you shall learn, but what we do here goes deeper. Wise men can see through artifice, and glamors dissolve before sharp eyes, but the face you are about to don will be as true and solid as that face you were born with. Keep your eyes closed."

The Ugly Little Girl, Dance 64

Quote

 

"All men must serve." And so she did, three days of every thirty. When the moon was black she was no one, a servant of the Many-Faced God in a robe of black and white. She walked beside the kindly man through the fragrant darkness, carrying her iron lantern. She washed the dead, went through their clothes, and counted out their coins. Some days she still helped Umma cook, chopping big white mushrooms and boning fish. But only when the moon was black. The rest of the time she was an orphan girl in a pair of battered boots too big for her feet and a brown cloak with a ragged hem, crying "Mussels and co**ckles and clams" as she wheeled her barrow through the Ragman's Harbor.

...

It made her angry to see Dareon sitting there so brazen, making eyes at Lanna as his fingers danced across the harp strings. The whores called him the black singer, but there was hardly any black about him now. With the coin his singing brought him, the crow had transformed himself into a peacock. Today he wore a plush purple cloak lined with vair, a striped white-and-lilac tunic, and the parti-colored breeches of a bravo, but he owned a silken cloak as well, and one made of burgundy velvet that was lined with cloth-of-gold. The only black about him was his boots. Cat had heard him tell Lanna that he'd thrown all the rest in a canal. "I am done with darkness," he had announced.

...

By the time Cat returned to Brusco's house, an evening fog was gathering above the small canal. She put away her barrow, found Brusco in his counting room, and thumped her purse down on the table in front of him. She thumped the boots down too.

Brusco gave the purse a pat. "Good. But what's this?"

"Boots."

"Good boots are hard to find," said Brusco, "but these are too small for my feet." He picked one up to squint at it.

"The moon will be black tonight," she reminded him.

"Best you pray, then." Brusco shoved the boots aside and poured out the coins to count them. "Valar dohaeris."

Valar morghulis, she thought.

...

"Dareon is dead. The black singer who was sleeping at the Happy Port. He was really a deserter from the Night's Watch. Someone slit his throat and pushed him into a canal, but they kept his boots."

"Good boots are hard to find."

"Just so." She tried to keep her face still.

"Who could have done this thing, I wonder?"

"Arya of House Stark." She watched his eyes, his mouth, the muscles of his jaw.

"That girl? I thought she had left Braavos. Who are you?"

"No one."

"You lie."

 

Cat of the Canals, Feast 34

Edited by Lost Melnibonean

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On 12/29/2016 at 10:08 AM, Rho'd Berth said:

In ADWD Barristan compares Quentyn to mud:

"She wants fire, and Dorne sent her mud. You could make a poultice out of mud to cool a fever. You could plant seeds in mud and grow a crop to feed your children. Mud would nourish you, where fire would only consume you, but fools and children and young girls would choose fire every time"

I think these mud references are telling us that House Mudd, associated with Oldstones and the tomb of King Tristifer, will rise again in some way. Tristifer was King of the Rivers and Hills, which unites two landforms that have been split into the Riverlands and (possibly) the Vale in contemporary Westeros. The Andals lost some wisdom of the First Men that is trying to reassert itself.

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On 24/12/2016 at 7:21 AM, Schwarze Sonne said:

Umm. I believe that Oberyn is a prince too, even if he's not the ruler of Dorne. So the gaunlet probably belonged to Oberyn. Oberyn is a knight to boost.

Bingo.

I don't have any conclusions to add, but would like to follow that thought a bit further - if the box and it's possessions were Oberyn's, the lock of blonde hair might be Tyene's Septa mother. Given the setting of the Prologue of Feast for Crows, and the bag of silver, we might suspect that Obara's mother plied her trade at the Quill and Tankard, too. 

Stretching it a bit further - could Obara's mother be Walgrave's sister? Apart from the key and the portrait, the contents of the box seem to have little to do with Walgrave. Or maybe, Walgrave's daughter - as he must be considerably older than Obara's mother to remember when Cressen was a young man at the Citidel.  So maybe he inherits her effects when she drinks herself to death? Most if not all the things in it are not hers, but there is a theme in this chapter about stolen things. Maybe Walgrave never did have the key because it was never his box, a fact that might have slipped his memory when he broke into it - although he remembered the glove when he saw it. An abandoned or jealous lover might seize on things like a lock of hair not hers, for proof of infidelity (to confront him with, or his other lover, or for the purpose of blackmail). Or maybe the box was in her keeping, but she did not have the key to it either. Apart from who owned the box and how it got to the ravenry, I have (at least) three further questions, assuming the contents are love-tokens:-

who was the lover that Oberyn took the gauntlet from/gave the gauntlet to? 

What is the story with the silver? Obara's mother is a whore, so it could represent her, but she doesn't seem to have had much reason to save for the future in her last year, beyond the simple fact that drinking oneself to death isn't cheap, and, as Illyrio has established, takes an unpredictably long amount of time to do.

In Christian cultures, a bag of silver symbolises betrayal. In the Song of Ice and Fire, the catspaw that attacked Catelyn apparently left a bag of silver. Mance had one about the same time, when he visited Winterfell to see King Robert, disguised as a bard. Lord Beric paid a bag of silver to the brothers of the Sept outside Maidenpool that was ravaged by the bloody mummers. Sam had one when he arrived in Braavos. 'They say' Eddard paid one to the girl who might have been Wylla who brought his boat across the bite in Robert's Rebellion. Catelyn paid one to the oarsmen of the Storm Dancer, too.

In all these instances there is an element of assumed identity (eg. Utt pretending to be a Septon, Daeron taking on his new role as a Braavosi singer, Catelyn was paying not just for speed but secrecy, probably unwisely, but still, attempting to conceal her identity at the time.) In this chapter, there is also an element of assumed identity in the faceless man and in Pate's transformation from novice to thief to the faceless man's new identity.

In this chapter, silver also represents the link of healing:

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Ebrose might not think him worthy of the silver, but Pate knew how to set a bone and leech a fever. (AFfC, Ch.0 Prologue)

and poison

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All the world knew that a maester forged his silver link when he learned the art of healing—but the world preferred to forget that men who knew how to heal also knew how to kill.(ACoK, Ch.0 Prologue)

My third question would be, why did Walgrave keep the key in the glove? Was it really his archmaester's key, or was it stolen from someone else, like the box and its other contents? Is it actually a skeleton key to all the doors of the citidel, as Pate believes it is? From it's description, I would suppose the locks of the Citidel could be picked easily enough without it. So now I doubt the motive of the faceless man - did he really want the key, or was that just a ruse to strip Pate of his identity? It seems cruel that he was obliged to give up any pretence to scholarship or honesty, to become what Maester Gormon had always claimed he was, immediately before his death.

The key is black Iron.  Black Iron is for ravenry, and more generally for spikes, and statues, and fortifications, armour, manacles, and protective jewellery - there is a military theme, a defensive one, in the general use of black iron, although it is used for kettles without any military implications. The coin Jaqen Hagar gave Arya was of black iron. The ravenry is the heart of the citadel, originally constructed as a naval citadel, for military defense, not a place of learning or communication (although there was a weirwood there since before the citadel was raised). Marwyn is quartered in the North tower, Walgrave and Pate in the West, below the white ravens.

Thinking in terms of Sand-snake associations, apart from Obara (the bag of stags) and Tyene (the blond hair), the gauntlet might possibly be associated with Elia (called, possibly by her father, Lady Lance, and obsessed with jousting). We know her mother is Ellaria, and Ellaria is the blood of Lord Harmen Uller of Hellholt, who, like his brother Ser Ullwyck, were also companions to Prince Oberyn - perhaps Oberyn got the glove from one of them. Although Oberyn himself was a jouster, so there isn't really a need to look for a lover who was a jouster, that Elia might have inherited her love of horses from.

Apart from his moustache, we know nothing about Archmaester Walgrave's appearance but that it is that of an old man, and that it resembles the woman in the portrait. None of the Sandsnakes have a moustache. It seems unlikely that it could be associated with Lady Nym's mother, or Sarella's. Although, as Walgrave is associated with the Citidel, and Sarella is insatiably curious and loves Oldtown as much as Obara hates it, if the portrait was of a particular Sandsnake mother, it seems more likely to be hers than Lady Nym's. More probably, Oberyn had paramours we don't yet know of. There is one we do know of, though, the one he took at sixteen, Lord Yronwood's paramour, who earnt him his Red Viper moniker. Maybe the Walgrave-like portrait was her. They say poison is a woman's weapon, too. The heir to Yronwood seems not to have held any grudges - or at least, Doran was confident that he would not harm Quentyn when he fostered him there.

If even one of the contents of this box is Oberyn's, there is a strong association with it and with poison. Perhaps the key, rather than the coin that Pate bit, was poisoned. Perhaps that was why it was kept in the gauntlet. That Walgrave kept any of Oberyn's stuff might imply there was a secret channel of communication between him and Doran, as we know there was between Varys and the Citadel. Perhaps this collection of love tokens was not made to provide proof, but to remove it.

Oberyn isn't the only poisoner Walgrave knows, either, he knows Cressen too. Anyway, the ravenry seems to be the position a spy who rose in the Citadel would naturally wish to infiltrate. (Historically, the postmaster general was a spy first and a manager of postal services second). It seems that Walgrave's wits have only started wandering in the last year (judging by the incidents Pate relates - Walgrave could feed and dress and clean himself when Pate started to serve him, and the order of the events he relates implies Maester Gormon took to serving in Walgrave's place, under the Iron mask, after the incident in the library, only half a year earlier.)

Oberyn came to the Citidel sometime after he turned sixteen (going by Obara's age, and the thing with Lord Yronwoods paramour happening before he went there, according to Tyrion's knowledge (ASoS, Ch.38 Tyrion V)) although he was also in Oldtown when Tyrion was born, and, at the age of fourteen, complained that the women at Casterley Rock were 'too chaste'. So it is possible he found a lady at Oldtown that was none too chaste, before he was obliged to visit Casterley Rock. He might have returned to Oldtown after he had grown bored with the Citadel, too. (It seems more likely he would have met Lady Nym's mother in Essos, and that at least four years had passed between his bedding Obara's mother, and Obara taking up the spear.)

*

A couple of things I never noticed until today:

Quote

“You may be right. I will send word to you at Sunspear.”
“So long as the word is war.” Obara turned upon her heel and strode off as angrily as she had come(AFfC, Ch.02 The Captain Of Guards)

results in

Spoiler

Winds of Winter

Spoiler

One word from Arianne and those armies would march... so long as that word was dragon.  If instead the word she sent was war, Lord Yronwood and Lord Fowler and their armies would remain in place.  The Prince of Dorne was nothing if not subtle; here war meant wait. (Arianne II)

 

Well, it was Obara that said

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Dornishmen fight best at home, so I say let us hone our spears and wait. (AFfC, Ch.02 The Captain Of Guards)

Also, that line in the same chapter:

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'make note of their strengths and weaknesses,’ I told him, on the terrace. We were eating oranges. ‘Find us friends, if there are any to be found.'(AFfC, Ch.02 The Captain Of Guards)

seems to be a direct parallel to:

Quote

Robert was eating an orange and waxing fond about a morning at the Eyrie when they had been boys. “… had given Jon a barrel of oranges, remember? Only the things had gone rotten, so I flung mine across the table and hit Dacks right in the nose. You remember, Redfort’s pock-faced squire? He tossed one back at me, and before Jon could so much as fart, there were oranges flying across the High Hall in every direction.” He laughed uproariously, and even Ned smiled, remembering.
This was the boy he had grown up with, he thought; this was the Robert Baratheon he’d known and loved. If he could prove that the Lannisters were behind the attack on Bran, prove that they had murdered Jon Arryn, this man would listen.(AGoT, Ch.30 Eddard VII)

 

Edited by Walda

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Wow, I never noticed that Summer Islanders wear "feathered cloaks of red and green and yellow," (Cat of the Canals, Feast 34), and Pan-African colours are either red, gold, and green, or red, black, and green (Pan-African colors, Wikipedia. 

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12 hours ago, Lost Melnibonean said:

Wow, I never noticed that Summer Islanders wear "feathered cloaks of red and green and yellow," (Cat of the Canals, Feast 34), and Pan-African colours are either red, gold, and green, or red, black, and green (Pan-African colors, Wikipedia. 

It is also curious that we see these colorful feathers on a cape. One of Africa's southern most tips is the Cape of Good Hope... or as it is first named, The Cape of Storms. Either way, the current fate of Jalabhar is unknown, but he could be a key player once released. Or not???

Not only that, but it was Sansa who grew to like Jalabhar.

  • A Game of Thrones - Sansa II

    ...
    Jeyne Poole confessed herself frightened by the look of Jalabhar Xho, an exile prince from the Summer Isles who wore a cape of green and scarlet feathers over skin as dark as night, but when she saw young Lord Beric Dondarrion, with his hair like red gold and his black shield slashed by lightning, she pronounced herself willing to marry him on the instant.
Edited by The Fattest Leech
Oops spelling

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On 29.12.2016 at 5:08 PM, Rho'd Berth said:

In ADWD Barristan compares Quentyn to mud:

"She wants fire, and Dorne sent her mud. You could make a poultice out of mud to cool a fever. You could plant seeds in mud and grow a crop to feed your children. Mud would nourish you, where fire would only consume you, but fools and children and young girls would choose fire every time"

Mud is a good thing. Barri is basically spelling it out. Yet he serves the "fire" princess (soon to become blood and fire princess?). I think this is also meant for readers to think about the "heroic" KG. Barri, "the honourablest of the honourable" can see a discrepancy. A niggle. Maybe it isn't as simple as vowing and taking an oath and following orders?

We see Barri deifinitely not following orders in the last chapters of aDwD (as Dany isn't there to give any orders to poor Barri). A Queensguard going "rogue", if you like.

Meanwhile in Westeros, one of Barri's brothers, the only Kingsguard brother from Aerys II's time, Jaime, is riding around the Riverlands being worried about harvests. The mud aspect. Jaime doesn't want war and vengeange, he's worried about how will the smallfolk cope now that winter is coming, with granaries half-empty. Maybe the arrogant Kingslayer has learned something.

As a young KG knight he questioned, or was at least amazed at the lack of questioning from the "greatest and honourablest knights in the realm". LC Gerold Hightower told him not to judge the king (while the King burned imaginary adversaries alive), Jon Darry told him we're to protect the royal family "but not her [Queen Rhaella] from him." So they let the king rape and molest his wife. Jaime committed a horrible crime, killed the king he was sworn to protect. Kingslayer, oathbreaker, doomed foreverafter.

We readers know one of his reasons was noble. To save all the innocents (500,000 people) of KL from a wildfire death. The other reasons...

The Mad King commanded Jaime to bring him the head of Lord Tywin. He commanded Jaime to kill his father, to become a kinslayer. Now, in Westeros, the two worst sins are breaking guest right and kinslaying. Compared to that, kingslaying is just a crime.

Thirdly, Jaime wanted to kill Aerys II because he hated the guts of that little shit. Jaime'd spent two years witnessing the erratic behaviour and the atrocities, trying to cope by "going away inside". As he later advises Brienne and Tommen to do in difficult situations, so it's clear it's something Jaime did repeatedly, as his personal coping strategy.

Now Jaime is trying to uphold his knightly vows, and far away in Essos, Barri is faced with a situation where he cannot just follow orders but has to take a stand, and thereby maybe break his knightly (or QG) vows - too bad it's on a different continent with a different culture, they won't understand the significance.

I think Barri and Jaime are nice "mirrors" to compare.

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Re-reads are a beautiful thing...even when they are small details.

The heart tree at Winterfell is always described as melancholy, and even kinda scary to Bran at one point. But then later, during the false wedding to fArya, we get what??? A laughing tree :lol:

A Game of Thrones - Catelyn I

For her sake, Ned had built a small sept where she might sing to the seven faces of god, but the blood of the First Men still flowed in the veins of the Starks, and his own gods were the old ones, the nameless, faceless gods of the greenwood they shared with the vanished children of the forest.
At the center of the grove an ancient weirwood brooded over a small pool where the waters were black and cold. "The heart tree," Ned called it. The weirwood's bark was white as bone, its leaves dark red, like a thousand bloodstained hands. A face had been carved in the trunk of the great tree, its features long and melancholy, the deep-cut eyes red with dried sap and strangely watchful. They were old, those eyes; older than Winterfell itself. They had seen Brandon the Builder set the first stone, if the tales were true; they had watched the castle's granite walls rise around them. It was said that the children of the forest had carved the faces in the trees during the dawn centuries before the coming of the First Men across the narrow sea.
 

A Dance with Dragons - The Prince of Winterfell

Then the mists parted, like the curtain opening at a mummer show to reveal some new tableau. The heart tree appeared in front of them, its bony limbs spread wide. Fallen leaves lay about the wide white trunk in drifts of red and brown. The ravens were the thickest here, muttering to one another in the murderers' secret tongue. Ramsay Bolton stood beneath them, clad in high boots of soft grey leather and a black velvet doublet slashed with pink silk and glittering with garnet teardrops. A smile danced across his face. "Who comes?" His lips were moist, his neck red above his collar. "Who comes before the god?"
...
All around them lights glimmered through the mists, a hundred candles pale as shrouded stars. Theon stepped back, and Ramsay and his bride joined hands and knelt before the heart tree, bowing their heads in token of submission. The weirwood's carved red eyes stared down at them, its great red mouth open as if to laugh. In the branches overhead a raven quorked.
 

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An attempt to assasinate Daenerys is made in every book in which she is a POV (and if you consider AFFC and ADWD to simply be one huge book split into two parts, in each book).

AGOT - the wine seller with poison

ACOK - the Sorrowful Man with a manticore

ASOS - Mero, outside the walls of Meereen

ADWD - the poisoned locusts

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I had not seen this connection before, between Ned Stark and Dolorous Edd. This came from a Parisian forum member with only 66 posts (so far) and struck me as so original and important that I went to the Wiki for more background on Eddison Tollett (Eddison strikes me as a "Lightbringer" allusion) and House Tollett. The current Lord of House Tollett is named Uthor, which seems like wordplay on The Others and a historical Tollett, Torgold, participated in the Battle of the Seven Stars. This decisive Andal / First Men battle reads like a thinly-veiled allegory of Robert's Rebellion. Lots of potential here for mining symbolism with meaning for the current story.

 

Edited by Seams

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31 minutes ago, Seams said:

I had not seen this connection before, between Ned Stark and Dolorous Edd. This came from a Parisian forum member with only 66 posts (so far) and struck me as so original and important that I went to the Wiki for more background on Eddison Tollett (Eddison strikes me as a "Lightbringer" allusion) and House Tollett. The current Lord of House Tollett is named Uthor, which seems like wordplay on The Others and a historical Tollett, Torgold, participated in the Battle of the Seven Stars. This decisive Andal / First Men battle reads like a thinly-veiled allegory of Robert's Rebellion. Lots of potential here for mining symbolism with meaning for the current story.

 

I read the Battle of the Seven Stars as a foreshadowing of how the Second Dance of the Dragons will play out in the Vale. 

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Brienne is the Warrior. From Brienne's thoughts before she fights Rorge and Biter...
 

Quote

 

Brienne tried to keep the fear from her voice, but her mouth was dry as dust. She had a pretty good notion who wore the Hound’s helm. The children, she thought.

...

Seven, Brienne thought again, despairing. She had no chance against seven, she knew. No chance, and no choice.

 

Brienne, Feast 37

Quote

"The Warrior stands before the foe,protecting us where e’er we go.With sword and shield and spear and bow,he guards the little children."

Samwell, Storm 44

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Emmon Frey, Lord Walder's second son by his first wife Perra Royce, and currently 13th in line to inherit the Twins (6th if House Frey follows male-preference primogeniture), was at the hand's tourney in King's Landing. Presumably, his wife Genna Lannister, sister of Lord Tywin and uncle to Queen Cersei and Ser Jaime of the Kingsguard would have accompanied him. But there was no indication in the text that she was there. 

ETA

At the end of Feast, our last look at Riverrun, the new Lord of Riverrun, Emmon Frey had claimed his seat. Genna was with him, and Jaime inadvertently advised the Brotherhood without Banners, Tom O'Sevens, that she was the real power behind Emmon. Emon's heir, presumably, Ser Tywin Frey, son of the late Ser Cleos and Jeyne Darry, is with them, and most likely, so is Cleos's younger brother Ser Lyonel, and possibly, along with Lyonel's wife Melesa Crakehall. Ty's brother Willem is a page at Ashemark, and Emmon's youngest son is a page at Casterly Rock, so those two are out of harm's way, but the others are gonners, no? 

Edited by Lost Melnibonean

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16 hours ago, Lost Melnibonean said:

Brienne is the Warrior. From Brienne's thoughts before she fights Rorge and Biter...
 

Brienne, Feast 37

Samwell, Storm 44

One reason Brienne gets no respect is that ther doesn't seem to be any legend of a "warrior maid" (or warrior goddess) in Westerosi mythology: the Warrior is 100% male.  I had an idle notion that maybe Rhaegar picked Lyanna based on some prophecy of a warrior maid, and Brienne is actually the fulfillment of this prophecy, but i had to reject this theory due to total lack of evidence :(

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43 minutes ago, Lady bonehead said:

One reason Brienne gets no respect is that ther doesn't seem to be any legend of a "warrior maid" (or warrior goddess) in Westerosi mythology: the Warrior is 100% male.  I had an idle notion that maybe Rhaegar picked Lyanna based on some prophecy of a warrior maid, and Brienne is actually the fulfillment of this prophecy, but i had to reject this theory due to total lack of evidence :(

The possibility of a warrior maid in ASOIAF is not completely without merit since Septon Meribald describes Brienne as a warrior maid on a quest. 

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I

Quote

Three thousand smallfolk had crowded through the Mud Gate to see Ser Loras off the day he sailed, and three of every four were women. The sight had only served to fill her with contempt. She had wanted to scream at them that they were sheep, to tell them that all that they could ever hope to get from Loras Tyrell was a smile and a flower.

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

Yeap. Just ask Sansa.

II

Quote

A steady stream of informers had been making their way to the Red Keep, claiming knowledge of Tyrion, but four in one day was unusual.

"Aye," said Osmund. "One brought a head for you."

"I will see him first. Bring him to my solar." This time, let there be no mistakes. Let me be avenged at long last, so Joff can rest in peace. The septons said that the number seven was sacred to the gods. If so, perhaps this seventh head would bring her the balm her soul desired.

The man proved to be Tyroshi; short and stout and sweaty, with an unctuous smile that reminded her of Varys and a forked beard dyed green and pink. Cersei misliked him on sight, but was willing to overlook his flaws if he actually had Tyrion's head inside the chest he carried.

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

Sadly for Cersei, the head belonged to an old juggler in Tyrosh. Penny gives us the back story later. And we learn about three more...

Quote

Sad to say, the three would-be informers proved no more useful than the Tyroshi. One said that the Imp was hiding in an Oldtown brothel, pleasuring men with his mouth. It made for a droll picture, but Cersei did not believe it for an instant. The second claimed to have seen the dwarf in a mummer's show in Braavos. The third insisted Tyrion had become a hermit in the riverlands, living on some haunted hill.

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

The third is the ghost of High Heart, and the second is the dwarf in Mercy, Winds. So, when and how will learn about the dwarf in Oldtown?

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 Horror coiled cold hands around Sansa's throat. ACoK Sansa III

Sounds like one of the Redwyne twins turned into a wight trying to strangle her, doesn't it? 

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1 hour ago, Lost Melnibonean said:

I

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

Yeap. Just ask Sansa.

II

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

Sadly for Cersei, the head belonged to an old juggler in Tyrosh. Penny gives us the back story later. And we learn about three more...

Cersei VIII, Feast 36

The third is the ghost of High Heart, and the second is the dwarf in Mercy, Winds. So, when and how will learn about the dwarf in Oldtown?

I imagine in a Samwell chapter in Oldtown, since he's the only POV there :) Though it is interesting to consider that it is Arya who introduced us to both the Ghost of the High Heart in the Riverlands and Bobono in Mercy, so, assuming that we'll meet or hear more about this third dwarf, if it won't be through Samwell's POV, my bet would be through Arya's POV, when she returns to Westeros

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2 hours ago, Isobel Harper said:

 Horror coiled cold hands around Sansa's throat. ACoK Sansa III

Sounds like one of the Redwyne twins turned into a wight trying to strangle her, doesn't it? 

Meanwhile Slobber was... (fill in the blank)

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On 1/15/2017 at 4:25 PM, Seams said:

I had not seen this connection before, between Ned Stark and Dolorous Edd. This came from a Parisian forum member with only 66 posts (so far) and struck me as so original and important that I went to the Wiki for more background on Eddison Tollett (Eddison strikes me as a "Lightbringer" allusion) and House Tollett. The current Lord of House Tollett is named Uthor, which seems like wordplay on The Others and a historical Tollett, Torgold, participated in the Battle of the Seven Stars. This decisive Andal / First Men battle reads like a thinly-veiled allegory of Robert's Rebellion. Lots of potential here for mining symbolism with meaning for the current story.

 

That's great. Yeah, we need to look at Dolorous Edd more carefully.

I was re-reading aDwD prologue and never noticed before.

Quote

A hundred ravens took to the air, cawing as they felt him pass. A great elk trumpeted, unsettling the children clinging to his back. A
sleeping direwolf raised his head to snarl at empty air.

The ravens may belong to Coldhands. The great elk is maybe carrying Jojen and Meera, or Bran. Is the direwolf Summer?

 

 

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