Werthead

The Worldbreaker Saga by Kameron Hurley

44 posts in this topic

Fair enough, sounds very edgelordy and dickish (got a link?). If that's the case he must be a shit writer then, because it doesn't read much like HP for adults. :P

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On 3/12/2017 at 6:19 AM, Gabriele said:

I only read the samples avaliable online (I can seldom browse English books in Germans stores) and got the impression that she tried too hard to be diverse. Since I had no problems at all with Gardens of the Moon, it can't have been the dive into the world start.  

I couldn't get into Jemisin, either; the first person POV of that Thousand Kingdoms book reads like chick lit. 

I understand how you would get this impression, but I think it is the nature of the universe the books are set in, which is a (presumably) network of parallel worlds capable of being traversed, and the two parallel worlds that are featured in the first book just happen to be worlds that are universally matriarchichal for all the cultures portrayed.

From the perspective of the characters who have never encountered a patriarchical world, they have a lot of very deeply set biases and uncomfortable prejudices against men, and these thought processes are well realized and well executed within the context of this profoundly different culture.

I imagine if there were parallel worlds it would just be a coin flip whether one wound up in a universal matriarchy like Hurley posits, or a universal patriarchy like our own world. So in Hurley's universe, the two worlds she wrote about came up Heads (both matriarchy), sometimes coins do that, come up two-in-a-row. and of course, the structure of the novel itself depends on the interactions across two very like worlds, so she would need to have two that are alike in order to write the story properly. 

That doesn't strike me as trying to hard to be diverse, it strikes me as fundamental to the story, the inversion of the patriarchy.

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I always (meaning here both in this series and in the Bel Dame books) have the reaction to Hurley that I respect the ruthlessness, love a lot of the ideas, end up less than enamored with the action as it ends up on the page, but most of all, I find I want to read and know about everything that *didn't* make it onto the page, like there's another novel lurking behind it that's the story I'm interested in, not these particular assholes.  It's an interesting feeling, if a somewhat confusing one.

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On 15.3.2017 at 9:14 AM, lokisnow said:

I understand how you would get this impression, but I think it is the nature of the universe the books are set in, which is a (presumably) network of parallel worlds capable of being traversed, and the two parallel worlds that are featured in the first book just happen to be worlds that are universally matriarchichal for all the cultures portrayed. [...]

Maybe I miss a good book there. But I don't have the time and money to buy all books that get overall good reviews to find out if I'd like them in the long run. When the samples I can find don't work for me - and in case of Hurley I at least read all of them because of the positive talk about the book (often, a few lines are enough to sya 'no') - I won't buy the book. My TBR pile is scary enough as it is. :D 

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