commiedore

"My Family's Slave"

83 posts in this topic

8 hours ago, HouseVelaryon said:

Of course agree with you in that ISIS wives are definitely slaves but their situation is very different from Lola Eudocias. There are numerous examples of captured ISIS members themselves admitting that their "wives" were bought and sold and referring to them as "slave girls". It's clear that they considered them property which is the essence of slavery. 

And to be clear I'm not using cultural relativism as a blanket defense or saying this is something who someone from a different culture can never understand, however, studying the culture is required in order to see the underlying problem of the way she was treated which is a culturally flawed and systemic power dynamic between employer and employee. Just referring to the problem under the blanket definition of slavery and leaving it at that would end the conversation and wouldn't fairly illustrate how deeply rooted the problem that Lola Eudocia and many Filipinos who are put in similar situations overseas face.

I feel very strongly about the word slavery because, similar to the South of the United States, we're no stranger to slavery in the Philippines. We were a Spanish colony for 300 years ending only when we were, as an entire country, literally purchased from Spain by the United States for $20 million in 1898 which was decades after slavery in the US was officially abolished in 1865. We then continued as a colony of the US until just 1946. 

re: the bolded-- sorry but that's bullshit. the 'essence' of slavery is surely the bondage and servitude. not convinced commodification needs to enter into it at all. just because the tizon's may not have viewed eudocia as chattel (and who knows, it don't really matter because there is a noticeable lack of such a market, generally), that the word 'slavery' is apt here should not be in dispute

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18 hours ago, HouseVelaryon said:

Of course agree with you in that ISIS wives are definitely slaves but their situation is very different from Lola Eudocias. There are numerous examples of captured ISIS members themselves admitting that their "wives" were bought and sold and referring to them as "slave girls". It's clear that they considered them property which is the essence of slavery. 

And to be clear I'm not using cultural relativism as a blanket defense or saying this is something who someone from a different culture can never understand, however, studying the culture is required in order to see the underlying problem of the way she was treated which is a culturally flawed and systemic power dynamic between employer and employee. Just referring to the problem under the blanket definition of slavery and leaving it at that would end the conversation and wouldn't fairly illustrate how deeply rooted the problem that Lola Eudocia and many Filipinos who are put in similar situations overseas face.

I feel very strongly about the word slavery because, similar to the South of the United States, we're no stranger to slavery in the Philippines. We were a Spanish colony for 300 years ending only when we were, as an entire country, literally purchased from Spain by the United States for $20 million in 1898 which was decades after slavery in the US was officially abolished in 1865. We then continued as a colony of the US until just 1946. 

The essence of slavery isn't whether or not the slave master considers the slave their property.  It's one of those where if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, it's a duck even if you call it a horse.  Eudocia was a de facto slave.  The author is clear that Eudocia was the family slave.  

It's already been discussed that the slavery of today is different than the slavery of yesterday.  I think that's why it's difficult to use the words 'slave' and 'slavery' these days.  We hear slave and we imagine things from the history books, not our friend's domestic.  Slavery continues to exist the world over.  

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Alex's wife with some insight on those 20 years and the accusation of Alex not trying to help.

https://www.google.com/amp/people.com/human-interest/wife-writer-alex-tizon-family-secret-slave-speaks-out/amp/

 

Melissa says her late husband and his four siblings offered time and time again to take her back to the Philippines.

“They tried so hard when they were old enough to help her get out of the situation she was in with their parents,” says Melissa. “They gave her ways to move in with them or help her get back to the Philippines, but at that stage in life she had so much devotion to Alex’s mom, that she always wanted to stay and it wasn’t until Alex’s mom died in 1999, that she was finally free. And when we gave her options again saying ‘You can live with any of the siblings or go back to Philippines, we’ll take care of you.’ She finally felt like she could take one of those options, so chose to live with Alex and I.”

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