SerFrostyDongofTheNorth

grrm best novel/novella

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hiya people a newbie her just wonder how many how many people other than me here have ever read any other work from grrm and if you have what is your favorite story? mine being the pear-shaped man or possibly remembering melody. also a fairly big fan of the thousand worlds.so im wondering what ur guys opinions on other grrm work.

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Best novel: Fevre Dream.

Best short story: The Way of Cross and Dragon (honorary mentions: With Morning Comes Mistfall, and In the Lost Lands).

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18 hours ago, SerFrostyDongofTheNorth said:

hiya people a newbie her just wonder how many how many people other than me here have ever read any other work from grrm and if you have what is your favorite story? mine being the pear-shaped man or possibly remembering melody. also a fairly big fan of the thousand worlds.so im wondering what ur guys opinions on other grrm work.

Nice name. LOL

It's hard to choose a fave. I've been rating most of them pretty high over in this forum, with a few exceptions (Starlady).

 

16 hours ago, Roose Boltons Pet Leech said:

Best novel: Fevre Dream.

Best short story: The Way of Cross and Dragon (honorary mentions: With Morning Comes Mistfall, and In the Lost Lands).

Nice to find another fan of Cross and Dragon and Mistfall! Those are two I like a lot as well. :cheers:

Have you read The Lonely Songs of Laren Dorr?

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On 5/22/2017 at 2:33 AM, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

Nightflyers

And Seven Times Never Kill Man

Men of Greywater Station

Now I see why you don't trust the COTF. Can't trust those hive minds. Really hard to draw any other conclusion after reading those.

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25 minutes ago, Lord Wraith said:

Now I see why you don't trust the COTF. Can't trust those hive minds. Really hard to draw any other conclusion after reading those.

LOL yep. After reading And Seven Times Never Kill Man in particular, I was like oh, prophetic visions are probably all sent by nefarious forces. :D The similarities between the Jaenshi and the COTF are too glaring to ignore, just like the similarities between Roid Eris and Bloodraven.

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Sandkings! Can highly recommend. A must for Horror fans. 

Personally, I would skip Fevre dream. While the setting and the time era was interesting, I found the characters and plot dull and boring.

 

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Fevre Dream. The plot moves along at a strange pace, but it's a well told story that takes vampire lore in a very fun direction.

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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

LOL yep. After reading And Seven Times Never Kill Man in particular, I was like oh, prophetic visions are probably all sent by nefarious forces. :D The similarities between the Jaenshi and the COTF are too glaring to ignore,

I agree with the similarities between the Jaenshi and the CotF. Even down to the at first glance we have sympathy for the Jaenshi, but in the end, and especially on rereads, we see a more sinister side.

Quote

 

just like the similarities between Roid Eris and Bloodraven.

I do very much disagree that Royd is similar to Bloodraven. About the only thing they have in common is being locked away somewhere and being albino. However, I don't know that Royd was an actual albino and not just leucistic (need to go grab the book to double check). I think the "red eyes" always watching were given to the mother/Nightflyer instead (another Targ-dragon type).

I don't watch too many Preston Jacobs videos at all, but I did watch his take on this story, and while it is good, PJ misses a lot of connections to the ASOIAF world. But as I said on this forum before about this particular video of his, the comments section is probably supposed to be for more analysis and discussion... but it's youtube and the dregs come out to troll instead. Anyway, I know PJ makes the claim that George is using another telepath/shut-in type, but this does not mean they are all the same, or that they are all Bloodraven. George does use this archetype over and over, but they are always a little different, and Royd seems to have been divided into three characters in ASOIAF.

Royd is much more of a prototype for Jon, with a dash of Bran, and an even smaller dash of Rhaegar.

Royd was created as a cross-sex clone of his "mother", which translates to the gene manipulation we have in ASOIAF as incest, but the incest never actually happens and Royd actively riles against it throughout the story. BR did not have that issue and he actually loved his sister, as he tells Bran.

The Nightflyer is basically Drogon (Balerion reborn) and the "mother" is basically a key side of Daenerys's characterization, with a dash of Bloodraven. The mother is basically the Targaryen ideology which BR seems to be working for, but Royd was against to the point that he sacrificed his self to protect the other people on the ship... to the best of his ability. And, in the end, Royd chose another lady as his partner over his intended "destiny".

ADDING: Sorry, I meant to also say that the Volcryn is the hive mind in this story... and it does lure people to their death.

This is my favorite from George, tying with Meathouse Man (but I love them all).

Edited by The Fattest Leech

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Dying of the Light

A Song For Lya

A Song For Lya is probably my favorite story by GRRM. I also really liked Unsound Variations. 

 

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8 hours ago, The Fattest Leech said:

I agree with the similarities between the Jaenshi and the CotF. Even down to the at first glance we have sympathy for the Jaenshi, but in the end, and especially on rereads, we see a more sinister side.

I do very much disagree that Royd is similar to Bloodraven. About the only thing they have in common is being locked away somewhere and being albino. However, I don't know that Royd was an actual albino and not just leucistic (need to go grab the book to double check). I think the "red eyes" always watching were given to the mother/Nightflyer instead (another Targ-dragon type).

I don't watch too many Preston Jacobs videos at all, but I did watch his take on this story, and while it is good, PJ misses a lot of connections to the ASOIAF world. But as I said on this forum before about this particular video of his, the comments section is probably supposed to be for more analysis and discussion... but it's youtube and the dregs come out to troll instead. Anyway, I know PJ makes the claim that George is using another telepath/shut-in type, but this does not mean they are all the same, or that they are all Bloodraven. George does use this archetype over and over, but they are always a little different, and Royd seems to have been divided into three characters in ASOIAF.

Royd is much more of a prototype for Jon, with a dash of Bran, and an even smaller dash of Rhaegar.

Royd was created as a cross-sex clone of his "mother", which translates to the gene manipulation we have in ASOIAF as incest, but the incest never actually happens and Royd actively riles against it throughout the story. BR did not have that issue and he actually loved his sister, as he tells Bran.

The Nightflyer is basically Drogon (Balerion reborn) and the "mother" is basically a key side of Daenerys's characterization, with a dash of Bloodraven. The mother is basically the Targaryen ideology which BR seems to be working for, but Royd was against to the point that he sacrificed his self to protect the other people on the ship... to the best of his ability. And, in the end, Royd chose another lady as his partner over his intended "destiny".

ADDING: Sorry, I meant to also say that the Volcryn is the hive mind in this story... and it does lure people to their death.

This is my favorite from George, tying with Meathouse Man (but I love them all).

I actually agree with you about everything you said here. I was more referring to the blatant superficial similarities between Royd and BR. Albino, semi-omnipotent, watching all the characters all the time. And then Royd going into the computer has yet unknown levels of similarities to the weirnet. But most importantly to asoiaf, GRRM introduces us to the concept that a hive mind, in this case the Nightflyer computer, can have more than one consciousness fighting for dominance and control over the same physical system. And I personally think this will be crucial to Bran's ending. I am betting that the Old Gods will try to absorb Bran into the weirnet and take control of his powers (like they have already done with BR), but Bran will refuse and use his superior abilities to destroy the weirnet, or something along those lines. :D 

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52 minutes ago, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

 

And I personally think this will be crucial to Bran's ending. I am betting that the Old Gods will try to absorb Bran into the weirnet and take control of his powers (like they have already done with BR), but Bran will refuse and use his superior abilities to destroy the weirnet, or something along those lines. :D 

For a long time I was hesitant and flat out rejected the idea that the CotF could be in any way nefarious. It took many rereads of Seven Times Never Kill Man until I was convinced enough that it is a real possibility... if George decides to repeat himself this closely. I think the little children Jaenshi could have been a sacrifice like Jojen is. But that is just me :dunno: And as much as Brynden Bloodraven Rivers :wub: is my favorite, and I'd be his canine tooth ;) at the drop of a feather, I have always felt he was a shady guy (and not because he is a tree and trees give shade... or maybe that and I created a great pun by mistake:dunno:)

Ok, I'm punned out :smoking:

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23 minutes ago, The Fattest Leech said:

 

For a long time I was hesitant and flat out rejected the idea that the CotF could be in any way nefarious. It took many rereads of Seven Times Never Kill Man until I was convinced enough that it is a real possibility... if George decides to repeat himself this closely. I think the little children Jaenshi could have been a sacrifice like Jojen is. But that is just me :dunno: And as much as Brynden Bloodraven Rivers :wub: is my favorite, and I'd be his canine tooth ;) at the drop of a feather, I have always felt he was a shady guy (and not because he is a tree and trees give shade... or maybe that and I created a great pun by mistake:dunno:)

Ok, I'm punned out :smoking:

LOL nice puns ;) 

I kind of went the other direction. I used to think the living COTF like Leaf were more nefarious. But now I lean more toward the idea that the weirnet itself is the nefarious player, and the COTF, Others, and humans are all just trying to survive and are basically good guys. Essentially, if you have 3 separate groups of folks who all worship the same God (the weirnet), and God tells everyone to fight each other, I put the blame primarily on God.

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25 minutes ago, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

LOL nice puns ;) 

I kind of went the other direction. I used to think the living COTF like Leaf were more nefarious. But now I lean more toward the idea that the weirnet itself is the nefarious player, and the COTF, Others, and humans are all just trying to survive and are basically good guys. Essentially, if you have 3 separate groups of folks who all worship the same God (the weirnet), and God tells everyone to fight each other, I put the blame primarily on God.

I can see that- sorta. This is an area where I am still sifting through the details and have not decided on anything in particular. One thing for me, that also lends credence to your idea, is that little CotF character who is hooked up to the weirnet that tries to speak to Bran. What was he trying to say???

  • A Dance with Dragons - Bran III

    Bran ate with Summer and his pack, as a wolf. As a raven he flew with the murder, circling the hill at sunset, watching for foes, feeling the icy touch of the air. As Hodor he explored the caves. He found chambers full of bones, shafts that plunged deep into the earth, a place where the skeletons of gigantic bats hung upside down from the ceiling. He even crossed the slender stone bridge that arched over the abyss and discovered more passages and chambers on the far side. One was full of singers, enthroned like Brynden in nests of weirwood roots that wove under and through and around their bodies. Most of them looked dead to him, but as he crossed in front of them their eyes would open and follow the light of his torch, and one of them opened and closed a wrinkled mouth as if he were trying to speak. "Hodor," Bran said to him, and he felt the real Hodor stir down in his pit.

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8 minutes ago, The Fattest Leech said:

I can see that- sorta. This is an area where I am still sifting through the details and have not decided on anything in particular. One thing for me, that also lends credence to your idea, is that little CotF character who is hooked up to the weirnet that tries to speak to Bran. What was he trying to say???

  • A Dance with Dragons - Bran III

    Bran ate with Summer and his pack, as a wolf. As a raven he flew with the murder, circling the hill at sunset, watching for foes, feeling the icy touch of the air. As Hodor he explored the caves. He found chambers full of bones, shafts that plunged deep into the earth, a place where the skeletons of gigantic bats hung upside down from the ceiling. He even crossed the slender stone bridge that arched over the abyss and discovered more passages and chambers on the far side. One was full of singers, enthroned like Brynden in nests of weirwood roots that wove under and through and around their bodies. Most of them looked dead to him, but as he crossed in front of them their eyes would open and follow the light of his torch, and one of them opened and closed a wrinkled mouth as if he were trying to speak. "Hodor," Bran said to him, and he felt the real Hodor stir down in his pit.

Yes! That is a key detail that made me question the nature of life inside the weirnet. We are presented with the idea of a sort of peaceful immortality, but I think it would be much more GRRM to effectively create a living Hell with a single dominant greenseer controlling things. He may have even done something like this already in A Song For Lya. Additionally, this could set up an interesting dynamic with the Faceless Men, because a permanent living hell for thousands of souls would be like the worst thing ever to them, and they would want to give the gift of mercy. And I won't be surprised if Arya helps destroy the weirnet with her wolf pack. I really can't see the wolves being useful against armored soldiers or the Others or the wights, but they could be used to eat a bunch of underground greenseers like BR.

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2 minutes ago, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

Yes! That is a key detail that made me question the nature of life inside the weirnet. We are presented with the idea of a sort of peaceful immortality, but I think it would be much more GRRM to effectively create a living Hell with a single dominant greenseer controlling things. He may have even done something like this already in A Song For Lya.

Weeelllll, now that you mention it, I kinda think he has introduced a weirwood Greeshka into Bran's arc.

http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php?/topic/145362-brans-skin-is-changing-what-now/

2 minutes ago, 40 Thousand Skeletons said:

Additionally, this could set up an interesting dynamic with the Faceless Men, because a permanent living hell for thousands of souls would be like the worst thing ever to them, and they would want to give the gift of mercy. And I won't be surprised if Arya helps destroy the weirnet with her wolf pack. I really can't see the wolves being useful against armored soldiers or the Others or the wights, but they could be used to eat a bunch of underground greenseers like BR.

Maybe? :dunno:

  • A Dance with Dragons - Bran III

    No one ever knew when he was wearing Hodor's skin. Bran only had to smile, do as he was told, and mutter "Hodor" from time to time, and he could follow Meera and Jojen, grinning happily, without anyone suspecting it was really him. He often tagged along, whether he was wanted or not. In the end, the Reeds were glad he came. Jojen made it down the rope easily enough, but after Meera caught a blind white fish with her frog spear and it was time to climb back up, his arms began to tremble and he could not make it to the top, so they had to tie the rope around him and let Hodor haul him up. "Hodor," he grunted every time he gave a pull. "Hodor, hodor, hodor."
    The moon was a crescent, thin and sharp as the blade of a knife. Summer dug up a severed arm, black and covered with hoarfrost, its fingers opening and closing as it pulled itself across the frozen snow. There was still enough meat on it to fill his empty belly, and after that was done he cracked the arm bones for the marrow. Only then did the arm remember it was dead.

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