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James Steller

Kevan's role in his grandfather's death?

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After reading this:  , it suddenly occurs to me how quickly the narrator skates over the issue of Kevan Lannister's service to the Red Lion and Castamere. He was at Castamere during the time when the Reynes were openly defiant to Lord Tytos, and even ambushed and killed his father-in-law when Lord Marbrand was sent to arrest Lord Tarbeck. Tytos ended up pardoning them all for Lord Marbrand's death. Some say it was because he was being his usual weak self, but there's a note briefly hinting that Kevan was in service to Castamere at the time, and may have even been present at the attack.

That's a serious revelation. Was Kevan complicit in the death of his grandfather? And even if he wasn't, when did he find out? And what was his reaction? And even beyond all that, how did he stand being in the court of the men who so openly mock and hate his family? What was that like? All these questions about Kevan's life, forever lost because he's dead and we won't get to hear his side of the story! What a missed opportunity!

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Kevan had left to join the nine penny rebellion war before then and was charged by his brother to collect the debts owed to his house on his return

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2 hours ago, elder brother jonothor dar said:

Kevan had left to join the nine penny rebellion war before then and was charged by his brother to collect the debts owed to his house on his return

That's not true. Denys Marbrand died before the war, and Kevan  was squiring for Roger Reyne himself the whole time. So he must have at least known that Roger Reyne was guilty of killing Lord Marbrand.

But to address Steller's confusion, the thing to remember that Tytos was weak. It allowed Roger Reyne and the Tarbecks to act with impunity. Kevan was just more leverage, and even if he was later in a position to testify against the Reynes, his dad wouldn't have allowed for a trial to happen.

i can understand why Kevan isn't thinking about that part of his life during his chapter, but you're right, Steller. It was definitely a missed opportunity to hear a firsthand account of that region during that time period from someone other than Tywin.

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For some reason, the link I posted is gone. Just so everyone knows, it was the full westerlands chapter from GRRM's website.

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Kevan probably felt like Jamie did when he first entered the King's Guard.  He thought it was a great honor, and found comradery among his peers.  But everyone else knew he was just a hostage.

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I believe there is a note somewhere about the World Book, how in universe it was altered at the last minute due to the effect of the War of 5 Kings. Stannis and Eddard's work in Robert's Rebellion is negated, to appease the curent occupant of the Iron Throne. This could very well be something more of the same. Pity the link is gone, I don't have the world book handy to read it myself.

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I would imagine that Kevan did what he was supposed to do, no matter how reluctant. Kevan was a follower after all but its also entirely possible that Kevan was kept in Castamere as a hostage so that if things when sour, there would be no chance for Lannister to jump over the lines or to desert during the battle.

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