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Simon Steele

Autumn, scary books

56 posts in this topic

10 hours ago, Let's Get Kraken said:

Most of those cases I tend to think that the shooter having read Rage was incidental. Remember how many years that people blamed Marilyn Manson for Columbine before it was finally accepted that the shooters didn't even listen to his music? Although I know there was one incident where a shooter actually did have a physical copy of the book in his locker.

Actually I think it was pulled in the early to mid 2000s. He mentions having done so in the preface to Blaze which I think was published in 2007? He did publish an essay about gun violence shortly after Sandy Hook, however (which I see you linked part of).

Maybe I misunderstood that. But I'm with you, I think the evidence is incidental and shouldn't be linked. We could get into a whole debate about the issue of the shooters, but I think it's really dangerous to link any type of art to violent behavior.

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I agree with what you are all saying. I think it was pulled in mid 2004ish? I think wiki might have details.

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7 hours ago, Darth Richard II said:

I agree with what you are all saying. I think it was pulled in mid 2004ish? I think wiki might have details.

That seems right on what I've gone back and read now. But all this to say, I want to read Rage. I think people are afraid to write about this kind of story in an honest way. I wonder if King did it. I think it'd be as scary as any story could be.

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I read Rage in high school and remember nothing of it. Come to think of it the only Bachman book I remember at all is The Long Walk.

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You know, speaking of King, my son (12 years old) is really interested in him suddenly for some Halloween reading. I recommended Salem's Lot, but I guess vampires aren't a big draw anymore. Pet Sematary really interested him though. What do you think? I read it when I was his age. Some of the content bugged the shit out of me, but hell, that's what it's about, I suppose. He LOVED It the movie.

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That's about the age I started reading King. I guess it depends how you feel about THE VIOLENCE and THE SEX. Most of my sex ed I got from King. His books can be, uh, dirty, though I guess I don't need to tell you that. I don't remember Pet Semetary being that bad though in either department.

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IMO short fiction is the best intro to King. I'd start 'em off with the Night Shift or Skeleton Crew collections.

As novels go, Pet Sematary is definitely a solid choice. One of his scariest and really great to read this time of year.

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Heh, you know, I didn't find Pet Semetary scary at all, and I didn't even like it that much(ducks rocks). But I could probably count on one hand the books that have really scared me. I don't read King for scares, I read em because I like the stories.

But everyone loves Pet Semetary but me, so its probably a good intro.

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Tbh most King novels haven't scared me that much either, but I think that's because I read most of them as an adult. There are three exceptions.

Pet Sematary. I saw the movie when I was a kid and slept with the light on for a week.

The Jaunt was super unsettling. One of those concepts that I just couldn't get out of my head.

As the grown child of an alcoholic, Doctor Sleep scared the living shit out of me. Specifically

Spoiler

 

the way Danny grew up to be so much like his father.

 

 

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Been home sick a couple of days and fancied some seasonal reading so I zipped through Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay, which I really enjoyed. I appreciate the immediacy and authenticity of the prose. Also read my first Joe Hill - Heart Shaped Box - which I liked as I guess I kind of ever-so-slightly more literate Stephen King novel. Could it have done with a teensy bit more editing? I think it could. Overall, pretty good though. I'd recommend both if you want some spooky reads.

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I've read all of Hill's work now but The Fireman and I'd say Heart-shaped-box is easily the weakest. It's good, but kind of meandering and forgettable. Now, Horns, that book is going to hunt me for years.

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That is good to know. I would certainly read more of his stuff. It seemed like a promising beginning.

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On 9/21/2017 at 10:41 AM, RedEyedGhost said:

If you haven't read it, you need to read Southern Gods by John Hornor Jacobs, he has a very good (but standard) zombie book too - This Dark Earth.

The former is $1.99 across all e-formats in the US right now.

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On ‎10‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 7:01 AM, Isis said:

Been home sick a couple of days and fancied some seasonal reading so I zipped through Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay, which I really enjoyed. I appreciate the immediacy and authenticity of the prose. Also read my first Joe Hill - Heart Shaped Box - which I liked as I guess I kind of ever-so-slightly more literate Stephen King novel. Could it have done with a teensy bit more editing? I think it could. Overall, pretty good though. I'd recommend both if you want some spooky reads.

I've seen a few boarders give Tremblay high marks in the past week or so. I may pick up his Head Full of Ghosts after I finish Washington Irving. I'm kind of in the mood for another Joe R. Lansdale novel as well.

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The tor.com novella line includes some nice horror (adjacent) stories. Examples I've read and liked are

The Murders of Molly Southborne by Tade Thompson

Hammers on Bone as well as A Song for Quiet by Cassandra Khaw (her Rupert Wong novellas also are worth checking out)

The Sin du Jour novellas by Matt Wallace are a bit lighter.

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Posted (edited)

On ‎9‎/‎18‎/‎2017 at 11:23 PM, Simon Steele said:

 

My true love of horror comes from the movies--from the 80s. John Carpenter is my favorite. 

Some of the "big" names in horror that I've tried and could not finish due to the overwriting: McCammon, Ketchum, Little.

What do you guys think?

Quote

You can try High Cotton by Joe Landsdale. John Shirley has a short story collection called Black Butterflies. Another author you can try is Richard Laymon. The Woods are Dark is basically a gory 80s movie in book form. 

Others:

The Rats by John Herbert. - This is exactly what you think it is.

Books of Blood by Clive Barker. - All six volumes. Give the first volume a try. If you don't like the first one don't bother with the rest. 

The Elementals by Michael McDowell - Family oriented Haunted House novel.

The Matrix by Jonathan Aycliffe. Lovecraftian : Forbidden books and cultists.

Anno Dracula by Kim Newman  - Vampires

 

 

 

Edited by sainttriple7

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