Lady Noble

Audio Books: Love or Hate?

31 posts in this topic

Another thread inspired me to post this one.

What are your thoughts on ABs? I used to read a lot and although I'd still be able to do so if I sacrificed something, I'm not willing to do that. Now I can listen while I'm cooking, cleaning, exercising, etc. 

Have you ever listened to one?

Why or why not?

Would you consider listening to one?

Just curious what other users on here like, :).

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I used to hate them until about six years ago. I tended to be unable to focus on them for whatever reason and got distracted, constantly had to skip backward to re-listen to whole sections that I spaced out for. Plus I just liked actual paper books in my hands, same reason I don't like using Kindles and such. 

Then around the time the GoT HBO series started I wanted to read the novels but I was working and going to school full time then and had no time at all to spare them. Luckily (or unluckily depending on how you look at it) I was working in a mail room at the time stuffing envelopes. One of the most soul crushingly monotonous jobs that exist as far as I'm concerned, and the boss told me straight up on the first day that he recommended bringing headphones and an MP3 player to keep ourselves sane. So I went for the Roy Dotrice audio versions, and they were fan-fucking-tastic. 

Problem is now I can't go back to regular books. I'm so used to being able to multi-task while reading that just sitting there with a book doing literally nothing else feels like a waste of time. I could be cleaning or cooking or going for a walk all while taking in this same story. Plus my current job is also cool with headphones, so I listen to books all day. 

Major downside being when it comes to independently published books, or smaller authors, or more niche titles, there often isn't an audio version available and I just end up skipping over them. 

Edited by KiDisaster

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I love audiobooks because that's where I make like 90% of my income.

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I'm kind of handicapped in this matter. For several years now, I read almost exclusively in English. However, it is not my native language so every now and then I have to look up a new word that I don't know. That is way easier to do with eBook than with audio.

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Audiobooks have singlehandedly increased my "reading" after a period where my reading was glacial. The main reason is because I can listen while walking, jogging, cooking or (in the case of the old job) doing tasks that didn't require my full on attention. BAsically anything where my hands are not available to hold a book.

I think they are particularly good with non-fiction as I think my mind takes in info better by being "lectured" than by reading.

Some narrators also elevate books. I'm pretty sure James Marsters makes the "Dresden files" 30% better at least as he acts in places the writing doesn't necessarily point it out. Actually, I'd be intrigued as to whether Marsters does the reading via his own interpretation or whether there's a director to those audiobooks.

I'm pleased you went for "love or hate" rather than "Audiobooks or books". For me they don't compete with one another, I read when I can and I use audiobooks when I can't. Which means I do tend to use audiobooks more these days.

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Love em! I do alot of crocheting and other hand work, great way to catch up on my reading/listening of books. 

Never used to do it, but a few years ago my brother told me that's what he did when he had a long drive ahead of him. Went to the local library and signed out a few audio books and what a drive! 

I do have to concentrate a bit tho, I find myself going back a few times, can't listen n text at the same time. 

On the other hand, I still read alot, more ebooks than actual books.

Have recommended audio books to friends and they have told me that they can't imagine life with out them! 

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I don't spend enough time doing stuff that would enable me to listen to audiobooks i.e. i only drive 4 hours a month, Also i guestimate that i read about 4-6x as quick as an audiobook is read, it would drive me nuts. 

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Not for me unfortunately. My mind tends to wander and I've never had a reader elevate a book for me. I've tried Dresden Files and a few other acclaimed readers in audio. Maybe I just already read slow and act things out well in my head. 

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And some recommendation threads:

and

 

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If I drove I'd probably listen to them, but since I can read a chapter at least 5-6 times faster than listen to one, I find them an incredibly slow method of taking in information.

It's frustrating because I do want to find a better way of reading. I used to read 60-100 novels a year and for the last 2-3 years it's been more like 20 (in a good year). The problem is that what's eating up my reading time - writing, research, networking - is stuff that I can't easily do simultaneously with listening to audio books.

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7 hours ago, red snow said:

Some narrators also elevate books. I'm pretty sure James Marsters makes the "Dresden files" 30% better at least as he acts in places the writing doesn't necessarily point it out. Actually, I'd be intrigued as to whether Marsters does the reading via his own interpretation or whether there's a director to those audiobooks.

Basically came on this thread to say this.

I saw audio books as only a second option when reading was impossible until I started the Dresden Files on a long road trip. James Marsters (Spike from Buffy the Vampire Slayer) changed my view on the potential for audio books. 

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I actually listen to more books than I read lately. It's hard to find the time to sit down and actually dig into a book with my schedule, so audiobooks make it easier to keep up with my reading. I listen at the gym, when I'm driving, when I'm cleaning up around the house or shopping. I'd say for every paper book I read atm I listen to two audiobooks.

That being said, the books that I really want to dig into, the big releases, I always read a paper copy first. Most of the re-reads I do are also on audio.

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6 hours ago, BigFatCoward said:

I don't spend enough time doing stuff that would enable me to listen to audiobooks i.e. i only drive 4 hours a month, Also i guestimate that i read about 4-6x as quick as an audiobook is read, it would drive me nuts. 

Have you considered using them while you cycle? I listen to them mostly when I'm out walking the dog which works well. Though I guess if you are cycling you maybe need to be able to pay closer attention to your surroundings so audiobooks may not be ideal

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8 hours ago, red snow said:

Some narrators also elevate books. I'm pretty sure James Marsters makes the "Dresden files" 30% better at least as he acts in places the writing doesn't necessarily point it out. Actually, I'd be intrigued as to whether Marsters does the reading via his own interpretation or whether there's a director to those audiobooks.

I very much agree with this statement. Whenever I see that something is read by Claudia Black, I get very curious and excited.

8 hours ago, red snow said:

I'm pleased you went for "love or hate" rather than "Audiobooks or books". For me they don't compete with one another, I read when I can and I use audiobooks when I can't. Which means I do tend to use audiobooks more these days.

Also agreeing here.

To the OP, I have many audiobooks and with most all of them I also have the print book. I listen a lot nowadays because of my drive times and the fact that I work with my hands, have a busy family, and a small farm to attend to. Audiobooks have been a wonderful lifesaver for my mind. However, I also like having the print book to enjoy when I can, as well as to reread chapters and bits, and maybe to make some notes and such (sticky notes).

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I listen to them at work in the winter.  I run a chairlift and when I work the top booth you're up there all day with no breaks and reading isn't allowed because you have to be watching the lift at all times.  So the long and slow format is perfect.  

I'd rather just read, but in the situation, audiobooks are facking awesome

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2 hours ago, The Fattest Leech said:

 

I very much agree with this statement. Whenever I see that something is read by Claudia Black, I get very curious and excited.

Also agreeing here.

To the OP, I have many audiobooks and with most all of them I also have the print book. I listen a lot nowadays because of my drive times and the fact that I work with my hands, have a busy family, and a small farm to attend to. Audiobooks have been a wonderful lifesaver for my mind. However, I also like having the print book to enjoy when I can, as well as to reread chapters and bits, and maybe to make some notes and such (sticky notes).

What audiobooks are read by Claudia Black?  I love her voice.

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53 minutes ago, Ser Scot A Ellison said:

What audiobooks are read by Claudia Black?  I love her voice.

She does quite a few for GRRM in his anthologies, but she also does these as listed in Audible (the audiobook source I use). Her voice with its range and tone is amazing.

https://www.audible.com/search/ref=a_lib_tseft?advsearchKeywords=claudia+black&filterby=field-keywords&sprefixRefmarker=nb_sb_ss_i_4_8&sprefix=claudia+

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Audible is also a factor with Audioboks for me in the sense some releases are cheaper (via their "token" system) than hardback releases in some cases. It's only the collector side in me that would swing for the hardback over the audiobook in terms of cold hard cash. It's odd because the Audiobook clearly must cost more in terms of production.

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