Ran

References and Homages

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Florian the fool = Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian?

This Florian was an army officer (not strictly a knight, but a Captain of the Dragoons at a time when one had to be born a nobleman to get a commission in the French army. Which Florian's guardian, who got him the commission, was.) He retired from the army in 1788 to write comedy, having already become popular for his chivalric romances and verse.

He was imprisoned during the reign of terror, and although Robspierre was guillotined before he had time to sign Florian's death warrant, Florian died in prison of tuberculosis six weeks later.

His fables for children are probably the most widely read of his works now (not that any of his works are widely read now) and he coined the phrase "he who laughs last, laughs best"

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"There are no men like me. Only me." is  very similar to "There are no women like me. I am unique." from Blake's 7

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Has anyone ever noticed this?

The Hobbit, chapter 1

Quote

In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort.

It had a perfectly round door like a porthole, painted green, with a shiny yellow brass knob in the exact middle. The door opened on to a tube-shaped hall like a tunnel: a very comfortable tunnel without smoke, with panelled walls, and floors tiled and carpeted, provided with polished chairs, and lots and lots of pegs for hats and coats—the hobbit was fond of visitors.

A Feast for Crows, Brienne VI

Quote

Brother Narbert led the visitors around a chestnut tree to a wooden door set in the side of the hill.

“A cave with a door?” Ser Hyle said, surprised. [...]

Perhaps two thousand years ago the Hermit’s Hole had been a damp, dark place, floored with dirt and echoing to the sounds of dripping water, but no longer. The cave that Brienne and her companions entered had been turned into a warm, snug sanctum. Woolen carpets covered the ground, tapestries the walls. Tall beeswax candles gave more than ample light. The furnishings were strange but simple; a long table, a settle, a chest, several tall cases full of books, and chairs. All were made from driftwood, oddly shaped pieces cunningly joined together and polished till they shone a deep gold in the candlelight.

 

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On 1/31/2018 at 5:36 AM, Gnababa said:

Has anyone ever noticed this?

The Hobbit, chapter 1

A Feast for Crows, Brienne VI

 

I noticed that when I first read that, allthough I had forgotten about it until reading this your post.

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There's a lot of stuff here, not easy to check on duplicates, but the sword forged from the heart of a star reflects a similar weapon in de Camp's The Tritonian Ring. In that story the protagonist is tasked with retrieving that which the Gods fear, which was a ring forged from a fallen star. The ring is lost (treacherous ringbearer eaten by crocodiles) so the protagonist obtains the fallen star and takes it to the only smith who can forge that metal. Instead of a ring he has a sword made. As it turns out, the reason the Gods feared the ring was that the star metal killed magic.

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I'm sure someone has already written about this:

The Norse creation myth, from what I remember, says that the niflheim (world of ice) and a primordial world of fire (name escapes me) were separated by a huge chasm, and creation began when the ice and fire mingled, creating the first being. 

Has anyone done an analysis on this particular marriage of ice and fire and how it relates to the books? My instinct says that maybe he was inspired by the idea of ice and fire and took it to a while new place, but now I'm curious to see if any other readers who know far more about Norse mythology than me have already gone down this rabbit hole. 

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Posted (edited)

53 minutes ago, Bitterblooms said:

I'm sure someone has already written about this:

The Norse creation myth, from what I remember, says that the niflheim (world of ice) and a primordial world of fire (name escapes me) were separated by a huge chasm, and creation began when the ice and fire mingled, creating the first being. 

Has anyone done an analysis on this particular marriage of ice and fire and how it relates to the books? My instinct says that maybe he was inspired by the idea of ice and fire and took it to a while new place, but now I'm curious to see if any other readers who know far more about Norse mythology than me have already gone down this rabbit hole. 

Paste this into Google to start...

niflheim site:asoiaf.westeros.org

Edited by Lost Melnibonean

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On the Norse thing, Thor had a cart pulled by two goats, Tooth Gnasher and Tooth Grinder, which describes Stannis.

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In 1311 Mali Emperor Abubakari Keita II set sail with 2,000 ships to see what was on the other side of the Atlantic.  None of the ships ever returned.

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