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MadFox

The Dance Of Dragons

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I was wondering, how bad was this war? Also will there be more details on this war in, "The World of Ice and fire"?

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I was wondering, how bad was this war? Also will there be more details on this war in, "The World of Ice and fire"?

Yes, and not just there. The Dance will have section in the history of Westeros part of the book, and GRRM has written a 20,000-word 'narrative history' called The Princess and the Queen which will be published in the Dangerous Women collection later this year. Between them, we should get a lot more info on the Dance and how it unfolded.

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Yes, and not just there. The Dance will have section in the history of Westeros part of the book, and GRRM has written a 20,000-word 'narrative history' called The Princess and the Queen which will be published in the Dangerous Women collection later this year. Between them, we should get a lot more info on the Dance and how it unfolded.

Thank you for the reply, and the information.

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ISTR an estimate of 35,000 words being menitoned for tP&tQ. Has this been revised, or am I merely misremembering?

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Yeah, that is the number from the blurb:

and a 35,000-word novella by George R. R. Martin about the Dance of the Dragons, the vast civil war that tore Westeros apart nearly two centuries before the events of A Game of Thrones.

http://edelweiss.abo...?sku=076533206X

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I keep forgetting that it's that big.

Does anyone know the word-count of the Dunk and Egg stories by way of comparison? 35,000 words is more than 10% the length of A Game of Thrones, so it sounds like the story will be roughly in the same ball park as The Hedge Knight.

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The first 11 chapters from A Game of Thrones have a word-count of 34.112 words. So I'm guessing The Princess and the Queen will be around that size?

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The first 11 chapters from A Game of Thrones have a word-count of 34.112 words. So I'm guessing The Princess and the Queen will be around that size?

How many pages is that exactly?

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THK is 31600 words long and both TSS and TMK are around 37000, so the Princess and the Queen will be somewhere between them.

It varies between the editions, but I think that more or less 35000 words would be 70-75 pages. For reference, the first part of TPATQ that was released as a sample were 1,200 words (a 3.4% of the story).

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THK is 31600 words long and both TSS and TMK are around 37000, so the Princess and the Queen will be somewhere between them.

It varies between the editions, but I think that more or less 35000 words would be 70-75 pages. For reference, the first part of TPATQ that was released as a sample were 1,200 words (a 3.4% of the story).

Thanks this was helpful :D When they only release the word count it's hard to imagine how long the story is :D

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UK publisher Harper Voyager says 100 pages:

The collection will also feature a new and unpublished 100pp novella by George R.R. Martin set in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire – now the award-winning HBO show, Game of Thrones.

http://www.harpercol...s-9780007549405

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Was looking for an appropriate thread for this io9 article I read and found this one.


What The Dragons On Game Of ThronesTeach Us About Nuclear Weapons
I remember when "The Princess and the Queen" came out, there was an argument about the importance of dragons in war and if they were truly were a "nuclear deterrent" has GRRM stated.

Timothy Westmyer wrote an article agreeing this was the case. There's a lot of great parallels:

Nuclear weapons may help prevent existential threats, but they have limited use in other military operations or foreign policy goals. As the Tywin Lannister character mused, a "dragon hasn't won a war in 300 years. Armies win them all the time."
Even with his dragon triumvirate, Aegon the Conqueror was unable to force a resistant kingdom to bended knee. Most of Thrones' fictional realms offer a "target rich" environment, with sizable populations living in castles and pursuing strategies suitable to set-piece battle on open fields. The kingdom of Dorne, however, consisted of a rocky, mountainous, arid, desert landscape with relatively small cities, dispersed populations, and ample hiding places—making it more resistant to dragon warfare.

I'd check it out when you get the chance. Pretty fun reading!

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