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Ser Creighton

Corn Code Revision 8. The Game of Thrones exposed.

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Ser Creighton, thank you for doing further research. I do believe you have found a pattern with the 3's and the punctuation marks. I know Martin has done this also with the word snow. Many posters believe that Ned and Roberts conversation about people hiding and kings and the word Snow are referring to Jon Snow as a hint. Also there are other examples of punctuation irregularities that have causes some of us to theorize on hints. When Melisandre keeps saying she searches for Stannis and only sees snow.

There is a curious punctuation clue in the dialogue between Jeor Mormont and Jon in regard to his being a bastard. Its in the same area where the raven has croaked King.

AGOT pages 79-80

Jeor and Jon are discussing the fact that

" Rob will marry a beautiful princess and father sons on her. Robb will rule, you will serve. Men will call you a crow. Him they'll call Your Grace. Singers will praise every little thing he does, while your greatest deeds all go unsung. Tell me that none of this troubles you, Jon....and I'll name you a liar, and know I have the truth of it."

Jon drew himself up, taunt as a bowstring. " And if it did trouble me, what might I do, bastard as I am?"

( Notice that Martin has placed a question mark at the end of this sentance. What is Jon questioning regarding being a bastard??? curious insert of that ? mark)

Jeor replies " What will you do?" ( This reply answers the question about what options Jon could do if we read the above sentence that Jon is saying what can I do?) However the next sentence Jeor makes is where the clue is found.

"What will you do?" Mormont asked. " Bastard as you are?" (There is the irregular punctuation!) Jeor Mormont has just actually asked Jon or raised the question in the readers mind) Are you really a bastard?

"Be troubled", said Jon, " and keep my vows."

I do think you have found the key to unlocking the raven's words and also Hodor. Its the numbers and the punctuation of the words that is the key. Well played Ser Creighton! Well played! :)

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My pattern recognition skills are completely out of whack because I'm still not sure I follow the OP's analysis. But I wouldn't put it past GRRM to put code within the books, he has a ton of repeating motifs involving wounding, drowning ect. that I also believe are woven in as clues as well. I still contend this is the greatest mystery story ever written.

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My pattern recognition skills are completely out of whack because I'm still not sure I follow the OP's analysis. But I wouldn't put it past GRRM to put code within the books, he has a ton of repeating motifs involving wounding, drowning ect. that I also believe are woven in as clues as well. I still contend this is the greatest mystery story ever written.

In the books three is often synonymous with death, Martin uses it all the time.

The three KG at the tower of Joy.

There are always three blood riders.

The three killers Arya set free.

The three deaths Arya was given

The three Deaths Stannis was given.

3 Deaths to wake the dragon Drogo, Mirri and Dany's child.

3 men planning to kill Jon

3 Knives that stabbed Jon

I call it the corn code because that is the word most often used, but most any word will do. Sometimes even the name of the subject is used.

Now if you look closely at the text while reading, Martin often, really often takes a word and writes it 3 times in a row. Next the word is always spoken, it's verbal, it is being said out loud. Now sometimes the three words are broken up a little. "Corn, the raven cried. Corn, corn." Now even though this "the raven cried" is written down it is not spoken. What is being said is just corn 3 times in row. Now remember it is always verbal.

So you get this heavily repeated code.

Say you are a character in the book, and you are a member of the watch. And you get called to Jon's quarters, You walk and the raven screams "Corn! Corn! Corn! or "Meat! Meat! Meat!" And you and Jon sit down and start talking about the ranging you are going on. Well you are now a dead person. In the text you would be the subject, and the 3 word pattern would be for you. Soon you will be dead.

If a pattern appears like this "Corn! The raven cried. Corn! Corn! You would be dying at a latter date.

If it looked like this "Corn, the raven cried. Corn! corn! You will be in mortal peril in the future with a chance to survive.

Death comes in the form of 3. So if you go through the books and you this pattern. Someone in that room or scene is going to die. Even if you can't figure out the subject, make no mistake if two people are in a room and Corn! Corn! Corn! pattern shows up, one of them is soon to be dead.

Tell you what, pick up clash of kings and Storm of swords. and read the prologues and look for these patterns. It happens in both and the subject is easy to spot. Just look for the three pattern. Don't worry about the word just read them and when you see the same word used verbally like that take notice of what happens to that person or persons. Remember just look for the pattern it's really easy to see cause it is always has quotation marks.

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It's simple.

Substitute every instance of Corn with Hodor.

And then it all starts to become crystal clear.

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It's simple.

Substitute every instance of Corn with Hodor.

And then it all starts to become crystal clear.

I did that. Wait, I believe I have achieved enlightenment. :drunk:

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Ser Creighton, thank you for doing further research. I do believe you have found a pattern with the 3's and the punctuation marks. I know Martin has done this also with the word snow. Many posters believe that Ned and Roberts conversation about people hiding and kings and the word Snow are referring to Jon Snow as a hint. Also there are other examples of punctuation irregularities that have causes some of us to theorize on hints. When Melisandre keeps saying she searches for Stannis and only sees snow.

There is a curious punctuation clue in the dialogue between Jeor Mormont and Jon in regard to his being a bastard. Its in the same area where the raven has croaked King.

AGOT pages 79-80

Jeor and Jon are discussing the fact that

" Rob will marry a beautiful princess and father sons on her. Robb will rule, you will serve. Men will call you a crow. Him they'll call Your Grace. Singers will praise every little thing he does, while your greatest deeds all go unsung. Tell me that none of this troubles you, Jon....and I'll name you a liar, and know I have the truth of it."

Jon drew himself up, taunt as a bowstring. " And if it did trouble me, what might I do, bastard as I am?"

( Notice that Martin has placed a question mark at the end of this sentance. What is Jon questioning regarding being a bastard??? curious insert of that ? mark)

Jeor replies " What will you do?" ( This reply answers the question about what options Jon could do if we read the above sentence that Jon is saying what can I do?) However the next sentence Jeor makes is where the clue is found.

"What will you do?" Mormont asked. " Bastard as you are?" (There is the irregular punctuation!) Jeor Mormont has just actually asked Jon or raised the question in the readers mind) Are you really a bastard?

"Be troubled", said Jon, " and keep my vows."

I do think you have found the key to unlocking the raven's words and also Hodor. Its the numbers and the punctuation of the words that is the key. Well played Ser Creighton! Well played! :)

The first "?" is actually a question, in fact it is multiple question, Jeor also relies with a question. However it is the wording "Bastard that I am" and "Bastard that you are" that is the play, they can both be used as questions or statements. So when you read it you always take notice of it because it sounds a bit funny. In this case they are in fact questions but normally those are statements.

Also yes I have been working on all the three pattern words, and oh god is it a lot. However I am dropping the two pattern as I just can't do all those patterns for every book with every word and the three pattern is by far the most significant. But I got a treat for you since you brought up Jon, King and Snow. Two actually, actually make it three, because you have been so nice.

ADwD ch. 44:" "Jon stepped over a puddle of damp clothing. "Snow, Snow, Snow," the ravens called down from above."" Jon gets death coded, or does he? Now it looks like Jon is marked for death here, so what does, Martin do. He makes crystal clear what this means just a little later on.

ADwD ch. 58. ""Corn," the bird said, and "King" and, "Snow, Jon Snow, Jon Snow." That was queer. The bird never said his full name before, as best as Jon could recall."" Now this is the gem of all gems. Outside of the fact that he begins it with corn which I always enjoy. This has the most significant proof of the code. Martin has given the death code to Jon, but he hasn't and here he makes it clear. First note he actually calls it queer the full use of the name, he wants you to notice this. Second take a look at what he does. The word is only Snow. This unique in the whole series, it's the only time this code appears in this manner. Why not 3x "Jon Snow" why does the first word have to be different. Because to Martin if he uses 3x "Jon Snow" he has to kill him. But what is he killing off why the use of "Snow, Snow, Snow" in chapter 44? Look at the code again. He is not killing off "Jon," he is killing off 'Snow" Jon's bastard last name. Jon only got two coded mortal peril, but Snow is gettng 3 coded. Why is he doing this? What preceeds The 3 code? "King" And to be a King Jon needs his true name, the one he was born with.

Now you want to see the code get really cool. Where is it all going to happen? What if I told you Martin even gave the location of the big assasination attempt.

ADwD Ch.69: ""Girls," squaked Mormonts raven Girls, girls.""

Girls? Are girls in danger? Mortal peril in the future and the word "Girls." Where do all the girls live at the Night's Watch? They live at Hardin tower, where they attempted to kill Jon. So if Jon Snow went do to three stab wounds and Snow is all that died, than what Jon is getting up and why is the word "King" important?

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It's simple.

Substitute every instance of Corn with Hodor.

And then it all starts to become crystal clear.

Come on now, it's not so much the word as the number of time it is used. Wait till you see the Hodor code. Little Walder Frey was the first to receive it. It's going to be called Hodor a Code of silence. It's all part of the death code trilogy. And the Code works so bonus.

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I did that. Wait, I believe I have achieved enlightenment. :drunk:

You get "Hodor, Hodor, Hodor." and you will achieve a hole in the ground, don't mess with the big guy he has powers and shit.

And the code plays on.

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You get "Hodor, Hodor, Hodor." and you will achieve a hole in the ground, don't mess with the big guy he has powers and shit.

And the code plays on.

You're one to talk Longbough.. (*Belch*) :mellow:

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You're one to talk Longbough.. (*Belch*) :mellow:

Hahahah, the greatest hero in the books by far. But that is not where the name comes from, I was born with it.

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Hahahah, the greatest hero in the books by far. But that is not where the name comes from, I was born with it.

That's nice. :drunk:

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It sucks that some people are dismissing this because it's 'too crackpot' when it has more textual support than half the theories on this forum. Anyway, great job I really like it, even if I'm not entirely convinced.

You said in another thread that this code confirms Benjen's death, how? I looked in aGoT but the only thing I found was "Fool," repeated twice when Mormont says that he sent Benjen on a ranging, but that doesn't fit your pattern.

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Hats off to Sir Creighton for the original post - you prompted my first-ever entry into the forum!

I've started my first reread of the books, and I've been paying particular attention to Mormont's Raven. "Corn" was something of a mystery, and your theory is as interesting as anything I've seen. Clearly Bloodraven seems to be warging the Raven at various times, but he can't be warging the Raven all the time, right?

One of the things I've been rereading for more closely has been the presence of Bloodraven/Greenseers/Old Gods generally. I wonder if, in addition to Mormont's raven, Bloodraven may also be warging Balerion the old cat of the Red Keep and also Ghost. Are there any not-too-"crackpotty" threads that discuss the Bloodraven? I love finding subtle clues to the presence of the old gods within the natural imagery. It happens most often in godswoods, obviously.

Martin is much to subtle and deliberate a writer to include a repeating motif like the "corn code" accidentally.

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Ser Creighton! You rock in the world of codes! :bowdown:

I thank you for posting the reveal on Jon Snow and the word Snow and girls. I am in total awe. I kept going back and forth with the Girls, girls girls on my re-reads trying to figure out what that bird was trying to tell us the readers. Your explanation made it seem so easy to see..I am humbled..humbled I say! lol

It is a shame that some people are dismissing this theory. I actually think you have provided excellent examples of the code.

We will all know when TWOW comes out and the code is continued. I for one will give you kudos before the book because I think you have done excellent work.

I am in agreement with GreenBlood Orphan regarding Martin being a deliberate writer and he is repeating a motiff in the three words spoken.

Thanks for doing all the work and taking the time to post to the forum. My two sons have been so desolate regarding Jon's stabbing and I have tried to tell them that Martin has not written Jon out of the story ..your explanation is a great example for me to use with both of them. They are adults and have little time to do as many re-reads or clue searching. You made my day ser!

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In the books three is often synonymous with death, Martin uses it all the time.

The three KG at the tower of Joy.

There are always three blood riders.

The three killers Arya set free.

The three deaths Arya was given

The three Deaths Stannis was given.

3 Deaths to wake the dragon Drogo, Mirri and Dany's child.

3 men planning to kill Jon

3 Knives that stabbed Jon

Death comes in the form of 3. So if you go through the books and you this pattern. Someone in that room or scene is going to die. Even if you can't figure out the subject, make no mistake if two people are in a room and Corn! Corn! Corn! pattern shows up, one of them is soon to be dead.

Aegon, Visenya, Rhaenys. Drogon, Viserion, Rhaegal. The Dragon has three heads. :smug:

uh-hu...Child of three, daughter of death. ha!

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@ Ser Creighton

Jon never "feels the fourth knife", but it is included in the narrative. So is there a true three pattern there? or is the fourth knife a way out of certain death?

Dany's three treasons, three fires, threes mounts. What comes after the third? Death?

Three red priests Moqorro, Melisandre, Thoros of Myr.

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It sucks that some people are dismissing this because it's 'too crackpot' when it has more textual support than half the theories on this forum. Anyway, great job I really like it, even if I'm not entirely convinced.

You said in another thread that this code confirms Benjen's death, how? I looked in aGoT but the only thing I found was "Fool," repeated twice when Mormont says that he sent Benjen on a ranging, but that doesn't fit your pattern.

Hey everyone is entitled to their opinion and wouldn't have it any other way. As for text support you have not seen anything yet. I have a ton more of the examples. As for Benjen, I bet you used a search app on that on an Ipad, and yes it won't show up there. I had to go page by page. AGoT ch. 70 is where you want to look try the last 3 pages. The name is broke in two "Ben Jen, (descriptive text break) Ben Jen. Ben Jen." At the time this is used Benjen was still alive. This is the future death code, so he may still be alive but his death is certain. It's also one of the odd patterns as the name is broken, currently looking for another example of this.

I should have said Benjen is either dead or certain to die. I should point out that it appears in thrones that Martin was refining the code as he seems to experiment with it where as in the other books it is far more refined. Which makes sense this being the first book.

Thank you for your support by the way that was very nice of you to say about the thread. Don't worry I will win them over, people who have read this and read the books again will notice the code and may start to apply it. The death code itself is the real proof as it leaves behind a body of vidence, get it?

I don't know if I posted this one before but AGoT ch. 21: "Duel! Duel! Duel!

Mormont, Tyrion, Thorne and Marsh, all those names pop out in that scene. But there is one more name Jaremy Rykker and for some odd reason Tyrion has a conversation with him. Seems like Martin is just creating a very full world.

I do have to revise the thread once more though, I am affraid the 2 pattern must go. I think it will help other readers get through it and it needs some tweeks here and there.

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Hats off to Sir Creighton for the original post - you prompted my first-ever entry into the forum!

I've started my first reread of the books, and I've been paying particular attention to Mormont's Raven. "Corn" was something of a mystery, and your theory is as interesting as anything I've seen. Clearly Bloodraven seems to be warging the Raven at various times, but he can't be warging the Raven all the time, right?

One of the things I've been rereading for more closely has been the presence of Bloodraven/Greenseers/Old Gods generally. I wonder if, in addition to Mormont's raven, Bloodraven may also be warging Balerion the old cat of the Red Keep and also Ghost. Are there any not-too-"crackpotty" threads that discuss the Bloodraven? I love finding subtle clues to the presence of the old gods within the natural imagery. It happens most often in godswoods, obviously.

Martin is much to subtle and deliberate a writer to include a repeating motif like the "corn code" accidentally.

Welcome to the boards and thank you so much. But be aware while it is called the Corn, that being the most obvious use of the pattern, it can actually be any word used in that pattern. The 3 pattern is really what you want to focus on, that leaves the best trail of evidence. The 3 pattern is highly used and always effective. There exist a couple of anomalies but for the most part it's 3-4 odd patterns and two set three patterns used dozens of times. I am currently studying this pattern "Corn, corn, corn." to try and understand it's use a little better.

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Aegon, Visenya, Rhaenys. Drogon, Viserion, Rhaegal. The Dragon has three heads. :smug:

uh-hu...Child of three, daughter of death. ha!

Now your getting it and thank you so much for giving this another look.

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Hey everyone is entitled to their opinion and wouldn't have it any other way.

Of course they are not entitled to it, just expressing my opinion on their opinion :) I hope I didn't offend anyone.

Anyway I found the quote about 'Ben Jen', it's very interesting and I can't wait to hear more from you, keep up the good work.

Martin is much to subtle and deliberate a writer to include a repeating motif like the "corn code" accidentally.

:agree:

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