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brunhilda

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  1. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    Who are the other 49%? Confused overflow from the Daredevil panel?
  2. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    Rothfuss: https://www.newsweek.com/kingkiller-chronicle-book-3-patrick-rothfuss-doors-stone-name-wind-wise-mans-1155583?amp=1
  3. Liked it too. Why Strike? Because hero (although little shown here) and I suppose super famous dad? It worked better in Book 1 with Charlotte picking him and baffling her family. With Robin, it's because he sees and believes in her potential. As for the other women? Don't buy it. I think Robin needs a lot more healing before she could join the police force and her mental background could work against her. I'm unfamiliar with how that works in the UK. Right now, she needs a ton of emotional wins and is getting them through Strike. However, this is, what, how many times she was damselled in distressed at the end? That was super annoying to me. I liked seeing her go yorkshire goth. Another great thing of fun is counting off the white horse references in the story. Lots of them!
  4. I loved it, especially Clef. There's a texture and depth and wonder of RJB, like (stealing a metaphor) feeling the heft of real silverware vs a plastic take-out fork. Even when he's writing Thrilling Adventureā„¢, there's so much richness. Normally layering in politics and stuff irritates me, when it's clear the author is trying to win points. Like several other authors I read this year, he's making a huge effort to be multicultural, etc, au courant, but unlike (for example) Andy Weir, RJB pulls it off. His nods towards human trafficking, economic inequity, etc etc, are foundational rather than a checklist. I love that his characters are so layered and can be at times creepy and uncomfortable. Of all his books, this one has been the lightest. I don't know if it will haunt me like his earlier works (which read to me a bit Lisa Goldstein) and the cliffhanger ending instead of the self-contained stories (a la the cities) made me grrr.
  5. Third Murderbot. Again, nothing groundbeaking but delightful junk food reading. Very short but fun. Ancillary fan fic.
  6. brunhilda

    September '18 Reading - A Labor of Love

    The latest CJBox/Joe Pickett. I can't even remember the name. I liked it. One of the brighter of the later Pickett books despite the presence of Psychopath buddy, mostly due to Father/Daughter bonding. Fun. Forgettable. Perfect vacation reading. The first two Murderbot diaries. Liked them a lot. They're like the McDonald's fast food version of Ancillary. Nowhere near as good as number 1 but amusing. Very short and, also, quite forgettable. Great characterization by Wells but not one for the ages. Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons. Lyrically beautiful but ugly story that ultimately boils down to political triteness. It could have been so much better than it was. Swing and a miss.
  7. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    Goodkind gives me the creeps. Rothfuss just makes me sad. I wish he had the guts to say, "No, I won't finish the trilogy" and get on with his life (and ours). Everyone would be happier and maybe he'd write something new worth a damn
  8. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    [Never mind]
  9. brunhilda

    September '18 Reading - A Labor of Love

    I liked Foundryside too. It feels a little like him selling out away from finer writing but it works better for me than his earlier stuff like the Troupe. Also read and enjoyed Lethal White. It won't be for everyone as it's a bit tripe.
  10. brunhilda

    September '18 Reading - A Labor of Love

    So I just caught up with the Wandering Inn, which is currently in the middle of its fifth outing. It's been a charming few weeks. The story telling is not always polished but there's definitely talent there. I ended up skipping lots of chapters, particularly the side stories about persons I do not care for. On the one hand, I adore the living amoral skeleton, the emperor of the small village, and the tiny adopted child. On the other, the large scale stories and battles leave me unmoved. I can't stand the wars, the King of Destruction, and the [Lady] Magnolia, characters intended to provide a broader world sized scope. Some small interludes hit the mark (the earth [Doctor]), while others fall flat (the [Twin]s of [Boredom] and most of the frost fairies). Some characters never rise beyond caricatures. Others marysue. The early writing quickly improves, with fewer breaks for tears and vomit, although the tendency towards "fridge drama" via lost limbs and "meaningful deaths" remains throughout. The author constantly introduces new characters while weaving them effortlessly into the main stories. Instead of going off on Robert Jordan-like tangents, they pull those extra characters into the main conflicts. I like how story seeds are liberally planted and then harvested at leisure. There is a class of novels called "cozy mysteries". I would classify this web serial rpglit as "cozy rpg". The fun comes from the leveling up (where there are few stakes), from the moments of pure joy (from impromptu concerts to poop slimes), and the warmth of spending time with comfortable friends, many of whom remain reasonably flawed and interesting, with character growth. It's certainly not great literature but it was a delightful read. I have to wait a year or so and then start reading again. I would not like to follow the "read twice a week" model where you have to remember to come back again and again. If you have any recommendations for similar story telling (I believe next up is "Worm"), please let me know. I'm intrigued to read.
  11. brunhilda

    September '18 Reading - A Labor of Love

    Counting the days until Lethal White. Robin is an idiot. Strike is an idiot. I need these idiots to collide.
  12. brunhilda

    August '18 Reading- (Insert Clever Subtitle)

    Much of the WOT fun is finding the deep story hidden under the nominal story. As with Rothfuss, whom I am re-reading because I am a masochist. I'm also working through the extremely amateurish and lightweight Wandering Inn. It's caught my interest and is mildly amusing.
  13. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    I'm trying to figure out if I'll still be alive when Sanderson gets around to finishing the D3 manuscript that was sent around about five years ago to beta readers. I bet he has a clause in his will though that if he dies early, all the manuscripts and notes are burned.
  14. brunhilda

    August '18 Reading- (Insert Clever Subtitle)

    Finished off the Anthony Ryan Drake Trilogy. It was well done but the world was nasty, the people were beyond horrible, and the bad guys were over the top. Spy girl and nephew boy were fine if over-competent. Everyone else could just go dia(drake)f.
  15. brunhilda

    Rothfuss XIV: The Slow Regard of Luna Lovegood

    https://blog.patrickrothfuss.com/2018/08/a-blog-if-only-barely/ Come for the post, stick around for the comment section.
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