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Darry Man

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About Darry Man

  • Rank
    Freerider

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Plowman's Keep
  • Interests
    Feasting, fighting, and dreaming of a Targaryen restoration

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  1. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    I agree with this. There is a strong likelihood that she went to the HoB&W, as there are many similarities with that institution and the God's Eye. It's just not explicit in ASOIAF. Seeing the God's Eye first-hand will be a treat in the coming books.
  2. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    Not literally, but metaphorically equivalent. It's GRRM's symbolism through his word play: Isle of Gods = God's I.
  3. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    That, they will.
  4. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    There might be more than a few black brothers hidden with the embers under the weirwoods.
  5. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    I'm not sure if she actually goes to the HoB&W, but she does go to the Isle of Gods, i.e. the God's Eye Island.
  6. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    No, they don't.
  7. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    Starks have a lot of shame when it comes to their hoary whores.
  8. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    You don't say.
  9. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    I had no idea that "rime" was "frost". I only associated it with the Rime of the Ancient Mariner (which happens to be about a guy who shoots down a bird from the sky, instigating doom to his ship and fellow crewmen, who all die and then are resurrected, then get sucked down a whirlpool before the guy gets pulled out of the sea and ends up grey and alone telling his tale -- but that's neither here nor there!). There is something with the concept of being sheathed in a cold, hard veil. Enameled armor, for instance. Here's the passage on Jaime's phenomenal fever dream in ASOS: So, yes, @LmL is definitely correct in his equating of the Others to the Kingsguard. It's hard to say what was the price paid by the hoary whore and the rapist. There is an exchange, meaning both parties gave and receive. Yes, it is not equitable, but it doesn't have to be. The point is that both parties were transformed in some sense. In Thistle's case, she gains eternal life. It's a horrific undead hell, of course, but a it's a transformation nonetheless. In this story, a woman can be both a rape victim and a whore who receives a payment. Tysha was raped horribly but paid each time. Tyrion raped a whore in Selhorys (where else?) before paying her. Maybe we should be focusing on tracking down these types of incidents involving whores, at least to start. Maybe it is the inequitable exchange of violence and payment that creates the bloodmagic necessary to create the Others. Man, this story is dark. Good examples. Why not both? Good points to consider. I suppose we look for an exchange (a violent exchange?) between a perpetrator and a whore, possibly observed by a third party, and accompanied by the ice-moon and/or sun-king symbolism.
  10. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    In his latest livecast, @LmL brought forth the notion that Cersei was symbolically transformed into an ice-moon figure when she was imprisoned and shaved bald in the Great Sept, the huge white structure on Visenya's Hill. This represented her death and rebirth, and then she walks back to the sun-king's Red Keep in her pale glory.
  11. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    One of the castles along the Wall is named "Hoarfrost" FWIW
  12. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    The Others are going through the Wall and marching south. Some think it's to King's Landing, but it seems there might be a big battle brewing at the God's Eye (see here, among other theories). A Hoare as LC of the NW is definitely interesting, though. It fits the symbolism.
  13. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    Great find! I haven't dug into all these "whore" references yet, but it looks promising!
  14. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    The Others are covered in icy armor, which has no real color of its own but takes on the hue of its surroundings. They are described as "pale," however. In the same vein, just as Hoarfrost appears white, as it is crystalline water, but it also has no color. And then, as noted in this earlier essay by @LmL, we see what lies beneath the frosty hoar (from aSoS):
  15. Darry Man

    Where Whores Go

    Our friend Lucifer Means Lightbringer has a great post on the possible symbolism of Visenya Targaryen in relation to the ice-and-fire-moon hypothesis of ASOIAF. As usual, @LmL uses the context of small bits of information revealed by GRRM to help uncover symbolism of greater significance. In this case, when determining the color of Visenya's dragon, Vhagar, we find that this description from TWOAIF symbolically refers to a white (and possibly icy) dragon: Just a few thoughts on the “hoary old bitch” thing, which I found interesting. "Hoar" just isn’t just a synonym of snow or ice, but to be a bit more precise (and pedantic!), it is the frost that encases solids on a particularly humid, cold day. When Jon sees those trees encased in ice, they are covered in hoarfrost. Hoar is literally the “magic north of the Wall.” Thus it’s an especially apt term. So, whilst reading about the Iron Islands in TWOIAF, it came to me that this might be related to why the Ironborn who took over the riverlands were from House Hoare. Not sure how this jibes with the Hoare’s having “black blood” but it cannot be a coincidence to call these raiders, essentially, “ice men”. And where do Hoares go? The God’s Eye. Given GRRM’s predilection for puns, this got me wondering if he’s playing his usual rhyming games. Does “hoar” = “whore”? After all, assuming GRRM doesn’t have a prostitution fetish, there is an especially large number of references to whores in ASOIAF. Maybe hoar and whore are meant to allude to the ice-covered Others? Lo and behold, in the TWOIAF Driftwood Crowns section, we see this: IOW, a son of the Others blows a horn, and the rest of the Others breach a wall. Or how about applying the hoar=whore=Others hypothesis to the rotten old uncles Umber? The cognomen “Crowfood” Umber certainly implies that he’s a dead man walking, but “Whoresbane” Umber? He’s someone the icy Others might want to avoid. Of course there are far too many whores in this story (literal, not just metaphorical) to think that every whore represents the Others in every circumstance. However, it does make me want to pay more attention when this term is being used deliberately in the presence of a sun-king figure. Given that the Night’s King paid a significant price in exchange for her icy embrace, the Night’s Queen could truly be considered a hoary whore. So, to answer Tyrion's incessant question, where do whores go? To the God's Eye.
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