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NutBurz

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  1. Honestly, I like Dorne in the series because I believe that´s not far from what´s going to happen in the books. I stay away from spoilers including from the books, so I haven´t read the last chapter to see which direction things are blowing; but I´ve never expected Doran´s rule to last much longer, nor have I ever considered it a very "feminist" message to use a girl child as figurehead for your bid at a powerstruggle, even if such manipulation comes from the hands of women (a point I´ve seen often complained, how much more "shallow and less feminist" the Dorne plot line is in the show). Using children for political gain = not ok. Strong female characters don´t have an irrevocable "feminism approved" stamp on them, not any further from the fact that both men and women can be good and bad people all the same.
  2. This is exactly why I think Bronn is such a genius character. I disagree with this here: He is a comic relief without being unnecessary, because he is also very often the bridge between nobility and commons, he is the voice telling Tyrion and Jaime what normal people think and which both of them treasure because they understand they need that. He is a different kind of Ser Davos in that he shows how merit has always been an element of our societies. Bronn is more important to the script of GoT than, say, Gimli is for the script of LotR, which is considered a good adaptation. Story telling is much more than getting from A to B.
  3. That I can remember now: Bronn, no Penny, no high fantasy "The North Remembers", almost no super children (the exception here is super-arya which I still hope didn´t really happen), Tywin at harenhall, Robert Baratheon describing him charging and his horse being hit by an arrow while discussing his first kill with Barristan and Jaime.
  4. NutBurz

    Is Jon's blood a dragon shape?

    I´m sorry if this has been said before, but I´m pretty sure that´s a rough "heart of R´hllor". The earlier shot when the camera is arriving at Jon´s dead body is in a better angle.
  5. And I think that´s actually important, that she knows both names, because the words are " and with his last breath murmured a woman's name. ". Murmured makes it seem to me she couldn´t quite make out the word, and the phonems in Lyanna and Elia sound, again to me, confusing enough for a murmur in a dream.
  6. Sorry if I misunderstood this, but you´re saying that Denys makes a threat to kill Aerys if it looks like Tywin is going to attack, then Tywin makes it look like he´s going to attack (even if by mistake, which would be probably worse), then Denys kills Aerys and that´s somehow not clearly Tywin´s fault? By sending Barristan, he´s doing the exact one thing that would get Aerys killed - attacking - in a way that it would look like he was at least trying. Every odd would be against Barristan, and both scenarios would be "profitable" to him - either Barristan fails and he gets what he wants undercover, or Barristan succeeds and thus Tywin succeeds at rescuing his King without looking like he was going to attack. Again, to have both possibilities open. Considering he´s playing both Robert and Rhaegar, keeping Lyanna alive gives Rhaegar the possibility of using her and the deposition of his father as bargaining chips to end the war through diplomacy. Robert, however, probably charged at him without any discussion of terms. That´s why, in my opnion, Rhaegar died with a woman´s name in his lips - he must had be thinking "..but what about Lyanna? Don´t you want her back? I can give you Lyanna."
  7. I´m conflicted. Out of context like that it looks very promising, but if he said that as a nod to Rhaegar being able to spill the beans regarding Tywin´s plan, that would imply Tyrion knows about a plan and never thought about it. Unless he did and I don´t have the photographic memory to recall it. That would also imply Tywin letting Tyrion into the secret, which...eh, sounds odd, but I guess he did make Tyrion Hand of the King. On the other hand, why else would Tywin particularly want Rhaegar dead, if not for some story I´m sure Tywin didn´t believe? Could be just a jest, maybe not 100% of words are foreshadowing after all. ^^
  8. NutBurz

    The Heresy Project: Tywin + Lyanna = Dead Girl

    I´m not here to throw tomatoes, I hope you notice. ^^ I think your theory has plenty of merit, except for the points I mentioned, and I consider myself open to any possibilities backed by the text. I only reply hoping I can help you further strenghten your own theory. That said, I can maybe accept that Robert might have chased power without knowing what it was, like he was chasing "more hunting, whoring and drinking", and I can even accept that we didn´t know Robert at all in order to judge whether his friendship towards Ned was deep enough for him to care about his sister more than he cared about "hunting, whoring and drinking" (even though Ned "loves" Robert for remembering Lyanna after so many years - but then again, Ned was never very bright). However, Cersei loathed Robert when we get into her head. If she had ever plotted to become his Queen, don´t you think she would have regreted it even for a second while he was still alive? "I wish we could have plotted so I wound up with Rhaegar" or "Where would I be if I hadn´t plotted to be Queen" or "Wouldn´t the profecy come true anyway even if I hadn´t plotted to become Queen?" or anything of the like. I do agree. I believe that a character with a longer exposition to the reader could count on certain patterns to indicate that his thoughts or words might not be true, or that he might be automatically lying to himself. But in the case of Ser Kevan, I think there should be at least the invocation of an apparently out-of-place image right before he went on to expose the reader with something that would be a lie, sort of like the brain does.
  9. NutBurz

    The Heresy Project: Tywin + Lyanna = Dead Girl

    This is from the OP, under Contradictions. Could you please link me where this is from? If this is true, I have no problem with an aging Ser Kevan supressing his real shameful memories of events by forcing himself to believe in a widely accepted lie - that Rhaegar "looked at Lyanna" in a way he believes the prince could have looked at Cersei. Wishful thinking would even have him believe that in case that had happened, he could have been spared the shame he´s trying to supress. I also don´t believe Cersei would necessarily have to be "aroused" in order to be seducing Robert - just like I don´t believe she wouldn´t regret such a plot for even one second in her POVs. And I still find it hard to believe Robert was actively chasing power since he doesn´t seem to enjoy or exert any part of it - he uses his crown exclusively to do more of the same he always did as a lordling: hunting, whoring and drinking. He´s a fool, so he could easily be pointed into a direction and let his hunting, whoring and drinking do whatever damage the person controlling him expected. But I find it hard to see him as a minion, or a cold political player - he seems anything but cold. He would look at Tywin´s "puny" plan about killing his best friend´s sister and smash a hole somewhere in it with his warhammer so that he didn´t have to go through that.
  10. NutBurz

    The Heresy Project: Tywin + Lyanna = Dead Girl

    I like the theory, but considering how they shares premisses, I´d consider the one which uses Ser Porcupine Blouth to be more plausible, or the one with simpler assumptions. I´ve always suspected Robert´s easy acceptance of the Lannister´s actions during the Rebellion combined with the marriage and Tywin´s apparent lack of interest in Robert´s Small Council - I can see Tywin offering himself as an "alternate tutor" to Robert during some personal crisis the boy might have had with Jon Arryn at some point during the Rebellion, and I can even see Robert accepting it without taking it very seriously or even considering the kind of influence Tywin can have over people. But I can´t see Robert being an active and premeditated element of the plot to get rid of Lyanna. If nothing else because I don´t believe he would be a good enough actor to fool Ned that he still loves her after so many years. I also believe Cersei would have already thought, even for a second in one of her POVs, about a plot to become queen. And I think Ser Boros Blouth is much easier to blame than Ser Barristan Selmy ^^ My 2 cents regarding how obvious Jon´s parentage is - from my experience, it depends a lot on whether the person sticks to how much Jon looks and tries to act like Ned or to how unshakeable is Ned´s honor. I know three people who read the books around the same time counting me, and only one was not suspicious of something close to RLJ (either through love or prophecy) by the end of the 4th book - the guy who thought Jon was being a little rash and leader-like as a young Ned might have been. For me, the combination of Jon´s proactivity in the Wall regardless of words in a vow, with Ned´s bad case of poor political planning, and the romantic accounts of fateful Rhaegar and Harrenhal were the things that first made me consider that. We looked it up online after finishing, and I expected to find an infinity of clues I had missed, but I still don´t find it much stronger than most well made theories.
  11. I agree. I´ve always interpreted Robert´s easy acceptance of what happened in the Sack of King´s Landing as previous knowledge - I always doubted Tywin would watch the rebellion brew without making his own investment on it. In my mind, Tywin needed Robert to force the Dornish army out of Dorne - if he managed to do that, Tywin would take enough men to King´s Landing to hand it on a plate to Robert. I just could never place him on the other side of the bet, before the thread. How could he gamble with a position for Cersei without having any hand on the fate of Lyanna? Well, there you go, he was the one who got her in the first place and gave her to Rhaegar. Things that might have happened or not between the abduction and the ultimate resolution of the Trident don´t really matter - either a) Rhaegar gave Lyanna(+baby) back and unified the realm by deposing his father and appointed Tywin as Hand, or b ) Robert killed Rhaegar and deposed Aerys himself and Tywin has Lyanna killed (even if through an indirect suggestion to Rhaegar, who then orders the Kingsguards) in order to crown Cersei. In both scenarios, the Lannister army simply shows up for a parade.
  12. It doesn´t take a Lex Luthor to see that Reckless Warrior vs Mad King with a thing for burning people would result in war. Paranoid as Aerys was, anyone who slammed the gates a little harder would get a war in the making. edit-what I mean is, Tywin didn´t require Aerys´ acts of cruelty, that Brandon was executed as a traitor would be plenty. Brandon was not in position to raise banners, nor apparently was he patient enough to warn his father. He was probably rather stupid like a good Stark and didn´t expect imprisionment. That´s not hard to foresse.
  13. Both the Lannisters and the Targaryen are diplomaticly exhausted. Both rely on the status quo and sheer political power to keep themselves influential, but the status quo is changing and Tywin and Aerys had been undermining each other. Aerys was never a great politician and strategist, but Tywin was, and he most likely was the political tutor of Rhaegar. Like it´s said in the OP, Starks, Tullys, Baratheon and Arryn had been strenghtening their political ties, while Rhaegar was to have Dornish children. Tywin couldn´t possibly like that, and he most likely tried to influence Rhaegar against this arrangement. I don´t see Rhaegar willing to start the plan, as in capturing Lyanna, since from his point of view things are not that bad - his father is old, and he would have "all his reign" (if the conpiracists didn´t depose him first, which I´m sure was threat made by Tywin) to strenghten ties with the Center and the North. However, I also don´t see Rhaegar splitting up from Tywin once he heard the plan was put in motion, especially considering that the angle "it was my father who did it, not me, I´m here to save the day" was perfectly open, while Tywin could very well just go on with his plan and adapt it to not include Rhaegar at all. It´s not like Rhaegar would´ve had much of a choice. He could either play the good guy or watch Tywin paint him as the bad guy like his father. And Tywin makes that clear to him. I´ll repeat this, however unlikely it might be for it to be true - if during the ruse Rhaegar finds out Lyanna was pregnant, he would first suspect the people guarding her - but if they´re Kingsguard, it probably wasn´t them. So Lyanna was already pregnant when they took her? So Lyanna is expecting a Stark/Baratheon kid? Well, if this kid is born safely (and that takes some time, which Rhaegar would sit out), it´s another point for Good Guy Rhaegar - "hey, I saved your sister, and your bethroded, from my father, and kept her hidden from him and took care of her while she was fragile, and here, I even made sure she had your heir without further troubles". In one move, he could wash his hands from his father´s acts against the Stark, deliver the personified union between Stark and Baratheon and be the "sole" responsible for the new peace. It wouldn´t have been the Baratheons who unified the country, they would be the rebels who just got what they want. The Starks couldn´t hold Brandon´s and Rickard´s death against the crown, because the new crown actually saved their sister.
  14. Maybe not. We don´t know what he found in the ToJ. If we let ourselves be influenced by the series, it´s not hard to assume that one of the Kingsguard might have been tasked with killing Lyanna in case everything else went wrong. Burning evidence. I think it´s also fair to assume that if she was not in labor when he found her, but simply held hostage, that the baby would be taken elsewhere with more comfort, in either scenarios. In my own little universe where Jon is a Baratheon born of rape, Ned bringing up the fact that the event produced a child would be akward at least, in case he even knew it. We see in the first book Tyrion saying, and Jon remembering later, that "most men would rather deny a hard truth than face it".
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