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Moving Watch

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About Moving Watch

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    Freerider

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Saxonia
  • Interests
    drawing & painting, knitting & crocheting, reading & writing
    in search of the exit from the labyrinth

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  1. Moving Watch

    Official Testing Thread

    <table> <tr> <th>fruits</th> <th>vegetables</th> </tr> <tr> <td>apples</td> <td>carrots</td> </tr> </table>
  2. Moving Watch

    Official Testing Thread

    <table> <tr> <th>fruits</th> <th>vegetables</th> </tr> <tr> <td>apples</td> <td>carrots</td> </tr> </table>
  3. Moving Watch

    Did Varys know about the Purple Wedding?

    I agree. And I'm aware of the whole this-board-is-not-about-the-series issue. I used the quote nonetheless, because it puts in a nutshell exactly what i felt about the two reading the book (read the books first, then saw the show). But maybe you are right... Your quote opened my eyes on the mechanism, I can see his real agenda clearer now: The Purple Wedding was a Littlefinger thing, though I wouldn't exclude that it came in useful to Varys' intentions.
  4. Moving Watch

    Did Varys know about the Purple Wedding?

    It isn't Varys who needs the chaos, but Littlefinger (see the fabulous dialogue "Chaos is a ladder" from the series). On the contrary, Varys fears the chaos. I even suspect that his perpetual reference to "the realm" he pretents to be serving means, strictly speaking, "order" in a universal sense. So, no, I don't believe he knew about the PW, otherwise he would have acted. There's a never-ending competition between Varys and LF, and they run it head-to-head, so it's easily possible that one of them doesn't know about the plottings of his opponent.
  5. Moving Watch

    Fave moment in AFFC?

    Actually, I read all the chapters with bated breath as in all the books before - splendid writing is always splendid, whether it's about action or description. Apart from that, here's my fav chapters, as far as I remember: Cat of the Canals: When she woke the next morning, she was blind. And I was like "WTF! Why???! Why BLIND?! Poor poor girl!" Brienne VIII: She screamed a word. (Oh, those his last sentences!) I never liked Catelyn, but as LS, I began to hate her. She became merely a killing zombie, with no regard for justice. Anyway, she's a classical tragic mother figure, as the Greek tragedy couldn't depict it better! Generally, I consider ASoIaF more comparable to a gigantic tragedy than usual fan lit. The "guiltless guilt", the distinguishing mark of a tragedy, is especially apparent in the figure of the Brienne of Tarth. - Otherwise, I really didn't like the Biter-chapter. It was marvellous writing too, but it was way too cruel and vile - maybe the vilest chapter in all four books so far. Prologue: "What's happening?" he said. His legs had turned to water. "I don't understand." "And never will," a voice said sadly. The cobblestone rushed up to kiss him. Pate tried to cry for help, but his voice was failing too. His last thought was of Rosey. Another mystery! I'm pretty sure, the Alchemist is a Faceless Man - but what does he want in the Citadel? Yes, Meribald's speech was great, and yes, I celebrated Cersei's downfall as well (Littlefinger: "Cersei stumbles from one idiocy to the next... I always anticipated that she would beggar the realm and destroy herself, but I never expected she would do it quite so fast." lol) But perhaps most of all I loved the Dornish chapters. After all this greyblueness of Westeros, the cold and the starving, the psychos and the ugliness and brutality of war it was pure delight to find myself in a setting full of beauty and luxury. Though I don't suffer heat and wouldn't wish to live there, there was a relieving airiness in it. I loved the Sand Snakes and Arianne and her friends - their easygoing gaiety and their hot blood (Ser Gerold rose. "I believe I'll have a piss." "Watch where you set your feet," Drey cautioned. "It has been awhile since Prince Oberyn milked the local vipers." ) The Princess in The Tower: A fascinating piece of strategic thinking and literature. So Arianne was promised to Viserys! So Doran plans for a long time already to help the Targaryens back! And nearly nobody knew about it, at least his own daughter! Suddenly I understood his meek behavior: If so, a war with the Iron Throne is the last thing he could afford!
  6. Moving Watch

    Ned stark

    Oh, of course, that's right. Maybe, Varys had contrived it, but wouldn't he rather have handed Arya over to the Lannisters? Why should he be interested in saving her?
  7. Moving Watch

    Ned stark

    Though I haven't AGoT available yet to do a re-read, I'm pretty sure that he didn't, because I remember being amazed as I saw this detail in the show. Now, I wonder how Yoren found Arya in the crowd (and why)?
  8. Moving Watch

    Favorite Chapter from A Clash of Kings!?

    Oh yes, it was! But not without a giggle, as Rickon shouts at him angrily, that he can't die, and Luwin counters: "Hush now, child, I'm much older than you. I can... die as I please." And how could I forget: The Birth of the Shadow - in the tunnels beneath Storm's End! All at once, I understood the nature of a Shadowbinder. And I wondered whether Quaithe in Qarth has a similar agenda, as they both come from Asshai...
  9. Moving Watch

    What POV character has the best chapters

    I actually like all POVs and chapters, for it's the variety and richness of characters that captivates me... As I read the first Theon chapter, it seemed quite boring in the beginning. Perhaps I wasn't attuned to him, he didn't intrigue me at this stage. But this changed later on. Same for Daenerys, whom I wasn't overly excited about, until she mixed up the Palace of Dust. Mostly I enjoyed the Tyrion, Arya and Jon chapters. I can't find Jon boring at all, only a bit annoying unless he owned up to the Brotherhood for good. I find it most intriguing what's going on beyond the Wall, from there comes the greatest danger (and prospect, I guess). So, now in ASoS these are my favourite chapters, alongside with Arya's, Tyrion's and one more.
  10. Moving Watch

    Authors whose death you most regret?

    Absolutely! Wolfe didn't even outlive the publishing of his last two novels, and he had so much more to say, still... Julio Cortázar. He died at 70, though, but leukaemia/AIDS (as a result of receiving a blood transfusion) is a god-awful end. Principally, I had always hoped to meet him once and maybe talk a little about Argentine aunties, the fire of all fires and Maga... Don't forget Nikolai Gogol! Considering that he burnt in a delirium some of his manuscripts, which contained most of the second part of Dead Souls - that was sin against the world, not his creative imagination, as a staret did want him to believe!
  11. Moving Watch

    Favorite Chapter from A Clash of Kings!?

    The most haunting chapter for me was 68, Jon VIII - Farewell to Qhorin Halfand. How the great Qhorin (loved him from the first moment) lights the last fire with Jon, speaking with him once more the words of the vow (always a deeply touching moment), and then it all adds up to the last mission Qhorin charges Jon with... well, I found myself crying bitterly... (a rather rare situation) Further great chapters: The Weasel Soup - mind-blowing! As for me, Arya deserved her knightly accolade. The House of the Undying - Dany's Magical Mystery Tour Tyrion the Hand - all chapters were one single delight Jaime's Questioning - mostly because he unravelled some mysteries, and I partly believed him
  12. Moving Watch

    How have you started reading the aSoIaF books?

    My daughter was an avid fan of the series. Nearly every day she was raving about how she is dying for the next episode to watch and how terrible the next year will be until the start of the 7th season... I thought of it as of a stereotype black and white fantasy stuff similar to Lord of the Rings - don't beat me, I didn't like the movie, too overblown for my taste, and I never read the book, as I'm not a special fantasy fan (however, I loved Pullman's His Dark Materials very much). At the time I was deeply into whodunnits and psychological thrillers à la Tana French. I couldn't imagine enjoying a discontinuity like this. One day, my daughter couldn't resist to tell me a short episode (like some persons had to leave their castle, and there was a boy who had a crow with a third eye and a stableboy named Hodor who speaks nothing but "Hodor" - today I know which scene it was about *lol*), and as she got around the dreams the boy had and then around some ghouls named the White Walkers, I said: "Stop it! I've got a feeling, I should read this book!" I always preferred reading over watching, for I don't like my imagination being overwhelmed by foreign images. So I got the book from the local library, and as Val McDermid started to bore me, I gave it a shot. The beginning was a bit difficult, partly due to a lot of unkown words (I'm no native English), and I thought I wouldn't read it after all, but even then I was thrilled by the colourful, vivid beauty of Martin's diction. His description of the Others is just breathtaking! And as it came to the final showdown of the Prologue, I was caught entirely. Now, I whipped through the first two volumes within two months, having just begun the third one, making a daily report to my daughter, even watched the first season of the series and waiting for the arrival of the second (but I love the book still more than the show), and I have a bet with my daughter, who's faster: me reading through the first five books - or GRRM releasing his sixth volume.
  13. Moving Watch

    Favorite POV Character

    In the first book: Tyrion as POV plus - yes! - Littlefinger als non-POV. I just love smart chars with sharp wits. Littlefinger lost some points, when he betrayed Ned. I admit I was really shocked, I didn't want to believe it, though I knew he has to be taken with a huge grain of salt. Of course, I also liked Arya very much - you've just got to like her. And as a non-POV Syrio Forel. The POV most annoying for me was Daenerys. This perpetual "I'm the blood of the dragon"-stuff really ticked me off. And, yes, I hated Viserys - unless I saw him in the TV-series - since he's one of my favourites and Harry Lloyd became surely my favourite actor, he's just brilliant! In the second book there was almost solely secondary chars which fascinated me most:
  14. Moving Watch

    Am I the only one

    Got to Victarion long ago. The only char really annoying me for most of the first two volumes was Daenerys. But even that changed with
  15. Moving Watch

    Am I the only one

    Oh, I didn't like Theon either nor do I like him now. He's such a creep in dealing with women and as arrogant as dumb. Nevertheless I began to take an increasing interest in his chapters, as I came to learn what his problem actually is. It seems to me, that he is a forsaken child of sorts, he doesn't know where he really belongs. Grown up among strangers, how friendly they might have been, they still remain strangers, while he became estranged from his true family as well. In the end he doesn't know where he belongs at all, (spoiler from ACoK Theon III onwards) Among other things, it is just these psychologically sophisticated character sketches, that I love in Martin's saga so well. I for one can't find any chapters boring. The same for Iron Islands. I love the whole richness of landscapes, regions and mentalities in these books: the Eyrie, the North, Riverrun, the swamps of the Neck, the Iron Islands as well as the variety of regions in Essos - it's just fantastic!
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