Jump to content

Astrotherapist

Members
  • Content count

    66
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Astrotherapist

  1. Astrotherapist

    Red Flags: Dany = Meereen Nobles

    In Season 6, Varys discovered that the Sons of the Harpy were supported from outside of Mereen (Volantis, Yunkai, and Astapor), so yes those Mereenese nobles that she had imprisoned (and had fed one to her dragons) were innocent. It was rash and misdirected revenge for Selmy's death. The fascinated look on her face as she watched him burn and get eaten...
  2. Astrotherapist

    [Spoilers] Episode 806 Discussion

    This is pretty funny:
  3. Astrotherapist

    Independent North

    The sudden appearance of Drogon burning and eating most of this council -starting with Sansa- would have been a decided improvement on the situation and no less ludicrous than what actually transpired.
  4. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    Exactly what I was getting at. And what I meant is that IF this was so important (which it wasn't) and the North had always been agitating for independence then Ned would have negotiated it as soon as Robert's rebellion began, not after he was king.
  5. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    No, he was human and started merging into the roots over time because the weirwood provides the greatest attunement for greenseer abilities. And the 3EC in the books is likely Brynden Rivers. There's no telling how long Bran will live, but he will likely outlive malcontent Northmen, and I contend that the next generation would have been fine with being part of the Seven Kingdoms. The Warden of the North/Lord Paramount of the North rules over that region just like a king anyway. The North could have pushed for independence when the dragons diminished and died out or when Robert Baratheon took the throne, but they didn't, they just continued as before. Ned could have made that condition with Robert just as Cat negotiated same with Renly later if this was so important. It really feels like D&D did this to make Sansa's childhood wish come true. If this is GRRM outcome, it will probably feel more deserved because Sansa won't be written as such an arrogant, self-entitled, backstabbing, undermining bitch.
  6. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    When will Bran die? What's the longevity of a 3ER? The last one was thousands of years old (in the show), a fact which must be wound up with the function of the 3ER itself. Then there's Sansa's questionable rationale for secession: "But tens of thousands of Northmen fell in the Great War defending all of Westeros. And those who survived have seen too much and fought too hard ever to kneel again." But they most certainly would kneel to a Northerner now, to Brandon Stark, and no matter whether the relatively young Bran lives a full human life or for thousands of years, those Northmen that fought and sacrificed will have passed away and folks up there would just roll with the new norm as they did under Targaryen rule. If these are truly GRRM's final outcomes, they will have to (and likely will) be set up to make more sense than this.
  7. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    I gave it a 5. I'll give every episode a base score of five for being a top-notch production as far as cinematography, special FX, musical score, and acting go. Every episode is also an opportunity to immerse into GRRM's fantastic world and be with characters I've grown to love, and that's worth something too. Most of the actors have been brilliant, doing much of the heavy lifting when the script is lacking. Though D&D have a gift for visuals and spectacle and some shots looked like beautiful paintings, too much of the story fails to make sense, and that's where I subtract points. I was rolling okay with this episode and felt a good deal of tension and excitement until the time jump into the Dragonpit scene where the writers' stupidity really began in earnest. I sat through the second half like a zombie, totally deflated and scratching my head at numerous things like: -why Dany didn't execute Tyrion immediately. Drogon was there, public assembly, why not? -why there were seemingly a veritable multitude of Unsullied left when there are no replacements and they surely suffered varying degrees of attrition from every battle in which they've fought: Yunkai, Mereen, Casterly Rock, Winterfell, and King's Landing. -why Jon wasn't executed immediately by the vengeful and hardcore loyalist, Greyworm. Same with Tyrion, right after Jon. -why Tyrion wasn't allowed to speak, but then got to speak at length and even decided (not proposed) the new election system. -why there were no objections to, nor discussion of, this new, unorthodox election system, especially when lordships throughout the kingdoms have always inherited though familial succession, and evidently will continue to do so. -why Edmure Tully had to be humiliated - I saw no humor in this. It was embarrassing and awkward, especially his explicable submission to the command of his young, uppity niece. -why non-Lords and minor lords/bannermen like Royce got to vote. -why a spaceman was "elected" king and why Bran/3ER accepted it when he had previously denied his identity as Bran and rejected lordship of the North having transcended all such mundane, worldly concerns. Shouldn't he have burrowed beneath the weirwood in the Godswood enclosure to wrap himself in its roots for the next few thousand years like his predecessors? Is an emotionally-devoid "computer" which can't empathize with people, who mostly lives in the past now (as he explicitly stated) and not the present, really the best choice? -why the North needed to be independent when a Stark is now on the throne, -why Dorne and the Iron Islands especially, just fell in line and didn't secede after Sansa essentially crowned herself Queen of an independent North (through nepotism). At the very least we should have heard some objections from those quarters, whatever the final result. At this point, I found myself wishing that Drogon would suddenly fly in to burn and eat some of these people, starting with Sansa. That wouldn't have been any less ludicrous than what was transpiring at this council and would have seemed like an improvement. -why Greyworm would have accepted any of this nonsense, including the bogus "sentences" for Tyrion and Jon. -why the Dothraki are completely unaccounted for. And after the deaths of Jorah, Missandei and Dany, who's left to even speak their language and communicate with them? Greyworm? He never spoke it, and had barely learned the common tongue. And we never once heard any of these Dothraki warriors speak the common tongue. Maybe they should have attacked the council -- why not! -why a thoroughly selfish THUG was not only given Highgarden castle, but lordship over the most prosperous of the Kingdoms, and control over finances to boot --which, of course, are prioritized to build brothels. What a wise choice by Tyrion and King Bran! For haha moments only, apparently. -how Sam was made Grand Maester without completing the training for it, and if the Night's Watch is restored, how he's excused from his vows. -why Brienne is in the Kingsguard and not Sansa's Queensguard. Why would her previous oath be nullified? -why Bran was looking for Drogon. And why Bran never got to warg a dragon at all in this series. -why there's a Night's Watch when the threat of the White Walkers is over, the Wildlings are on friendly terms with everybody now and radically diminished to only a couple thousand people even if they weren't-- oh and the eastern edge of the Wall is gone. They just need a penal colony for outcasts and rejects? Yet it's still at Castle Black, within the bounds of the independent Kingdom of the North, not "The "Six Kingdoms"? -why Jon had to follow through with his sentence when it was given to placate Greyworm who quickly sailed away. I would have liked to see a duel between those two at some point in this episode. -what Jon was doing at the end. Was he "ranging" simultaneously with the Wildlings exit, or escorting the Wildlings, or actually joining them? And if the latter then why dress like a crow? I would have preferred a self-imposed exile to the far North where Jon wanted to go anyway instead of this outcome leveled as "punishment" and after all he's done to save their world! Now the character is returned all the way back to the Night's Watch where he started and even looking like he did in seasons 1-5. It would be much better that he just joins (and dresses like) Tormund and the Wildlings with the possibility of finding happiness in the arms of another 'Ygritte-like' character someday left open... instead of the "I will take no wife, guard against nothing, and live in a depressing, gloomy castle like a monk" fate consigned by Tyrion. He should surely just chuck that crap to the wind. I predicted the endings for Arya and Jon some time ago (even the final scene visually mirroring the very first in the series) but that gave me no satisfaction. This episode was supposed to wrap up loose ends, not leave loads of questions unanswered or create so many new ones. It's "bittersweet" for the wrong reasons, the painful part of that coming from writing. I still enjoyed some things though: Tyrion finding his siblings, the awesome shot of the dragon wings behind Daenerys, the callback to the House of the Undying (except this time Dany actually touched the throne), her citing Viserys --who basically raised her and programmed her obsessive ambition for the Iron Throne in the first place, Drogon's "acting" and his melting of the Iron Throne, Brienne recording Jamie's chronicle, Davos as Master of Ships, and Arya's sweet wolfship. Despite its many narrative flaws this season (and in seasons 5-7), the show still basically succeeded as entertainment -I felt entertained- and anxiously came back for more every time it aired. I'll miss it.
  8. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    Hearkens back to Olenna Tyrell in Season 7: "You're a dragon. Be a dragon!" Here's a gif of that: https://thumbs.gfycat.com/ShabbyDisgustingCricket-size_restricted.gif
  9. Astrotherapist

    [Poll] How would you rate episode 806?

    A number of people here are wondering why Arya has turned explorer and sails West at the end, but this was foreshadowed in Season 6 Episode 8 when Arya was in Braavos. While tending Arya's wounds from the Waif, Lady Crane invited her to join her theater group but Arya rejected that offer: LADY CRANE: Where will you go? ARYA: Essos is east and Westeros is west. But what's west of Westeros? LADY CRANE: I don't know. ARYA: Nobody does. That's where all the maps stop. The edge of the world, maybe. I'd like to see that. And so, with her business in Westeros settled, she did!
  10. She should be sentenced to marry Robin Arryn.
  11. Astrotherapist

    Title of the last episode

    "Confederate Was More Important"
  12. Astrotherapist

    People are hating this episode for the wrong reasons

    I think that many people just expected better results because the writers had an extra year to work on this season with only six episodes to focus upon. Yet this season is about the same quality as the last one (which was fairly poor), and they have reverted to the same idiotic devices. In this episode, Euron made his third, devastating, surprise attack at no cost to himself. Apparently, he has satellite intel which locates his enemies anywhere on the map, warp drive to get there instantly, cloaking devices and radar so that the Iron Fleet can avoid detection from and target aerial opponents, and ballistic missiles so powerful they can shred other ships like paper! Why did we ever upgrade to cannons when ballistae are just so bad ass! He should not have been able to surprise them this time, not when they know the Iron Fleet is a serious threat to any movement in the waters near King's Landing. Dragonstone is very near King's Landing and they should have anticipated that the island would have been captured or guarded. Did they even bother to leave a garrison there before going North?!? Nevermind, Euron was made into a diabolus ex machina because the writers had absolutely no idea how to even the odds against Dany's forces except for this, and making Tyrion into a military imbecile. The final scene in front of King's Landing is similar to the Dragon pit all over again with so much stupidity about it I can scarcely stand it. 1. Team Dany really can't get to that position in front of King's Landing without sailing past Euron somehow. Do they even have ships left after that attack? Did they use their own cloaking devices on their surviving vessels to get past his? Did they wave lots of white flags on the way to demanding unconditional surrender? 2. Dany's side really has no leverage from which to demand Cersei's surrender because her forces are depleted, she just lost another dragon which are now very vulnerable to Qyburn's new superduper ballistae and it has evidently been mass-produced as they proudly line the ramparts now. Qyburn pointed these things out but Tyrion and Dany apparently didn't factor them into their demand, totally ignoring the fact that surrender can only be forced from a position of dominance. 3. The writers clearly wanted another face-to-face confrontation for drama, so Team Dany is ridiculously close to Team Cersei, in a tactically vulnerable position, not only within range of the ballistae but bowshot as well. Dany has a tiny force which could be annihilated with missiles or overrun with cavalry, and Drogon is just sitting nearby, also in ballista range. 4. Cersei, the woman who took out all her enemies in King's Landing by detonating wildfire beneath the Sept of Baelor, doesn't take out her enemies here. 5. Tyrion "boldly" walks right up to the gate, virtually throwing himself at the mercy of his sister to appeal to the loving mother inside her while ignoring her entire history of deceit, subversion, treachery, attempted murder against him, and mass murder of the Sept victims, because she's "not a monster". 6. Cersei spares him again, this time for absolutely no reason at all. 7. Missandei, suddenly vindictive and uncompassionate about the fate of hundreds of thousands of civilians, encourages Dany to burn them all! This was a meeting between morons written by morons, and it might possibly be one of the most poorly contrived scenes in this entire series. So yeah, folks are mad or disappointed with the bad writing.
  13. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    Anyway, back to Gendry. If he is the son of Cersei, the current, official ruler of Westeros, then he would be her heir. And for the record, I'm not particularly attached to the R+C=G theory. It certainly isn't mine and it has been all over the Web for years, but I thought it was worth rehashing recently in light of Joe Dempsie's and Maisie Williams' comments this Spring. And because this is another Gendry thread that's all about bastards and Westerosi succession law again... just to mix it up a little.
  14. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    Not in the show. CERSEI: I felt something for you once, you know? ROBERT: I know. CERSEI: Even after we lost our first boy. For quite a while, actually. Was it ever possible for us? Was there ever a time, ever a moment? ROBERT: No. Zero motive for her lying at this point, the truth of her one-sided affections known and acknowledged between them here, the meaning of these words is quite explicit.
  15. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    Both, the feelings are a big part of it. If she loved Robert then, (and she loves her own progeny -period) then she wouldn't have murdered their baby.
  16. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    You're missing the point. "I know" from Robert means that part isn't a lie. Yes the relationship was crap from the outset because he never got over Lyanna, but that doesn't mean that she wasn't smitten with him, for a while anyway. A person can tell if someone else is into them.
  17. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    In the conversation in question, after she said "I felt something for you once, you know?", he replied with "I know". They both acknowledged a truth known between them.
  18. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    Sure but that was a very necessary deception. At the point of the conversation above, the relationship is dead, she's been slowly poisoning him to death with the Tears of Lys and his fate is sealed, so there's absolutely no motive for lying when she stated that she had once had feelings for him. It was just a preamble to the fact that they're long gone and she feels nothing. I did offer links to clips so people can gain their own impressions, but that's what I saw happening.
  19. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    This is what she told Ned, very hatefully and defensively after he confronted her, but it isn't what she said to Cat, nor even to Robert in their conversation which I quoted above. There was no reason for her to lie at that point either so I think we can take it at face value that she loved Robert and their first son, despite no reciprocation from him ever.
  20. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    A person's memory can extend back before four or five. I have memories from age two, myself. The child could have had a wet nurse. Some have suggested that Cersei visited the child for a time dressed as a tavern wench. Others have suggested that Gendry was given to some blonde tavern wench, but he's still Cersei's son.
  21. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    Bran can be seen externally as the Lord of Winterfell (despite his rejection of the position) and his word might count. That's all there is, testimony, since as you rightly pointed out there really isn't any physical evidence like DNA tests in that society. Of course if Varys was involved in concealing Gendry's identity (as surmised above), then he can step forth as well. On the matter of public acknowledgement, none of this has to matter, anymore than it did when Jon was named "King in the North". After the dust settles, Gendry could be named King in a similar manner.
  22. Astrotherapist

    King Gendry I Baratheon

    There is an outside possibility (however remote) that Gendry is trueborn, the product of Robert and Cersei. Here's some food for thought, most of which I wrote up elsewhere last month. R+C=G is an old theory which fans have debated off and on ever since Season 1 because that's where most of its evidence resides, starting with:s01e02 "The Kingsroad", where Cersei said this to Catelyn Stark: "l lost my first boy, a little black-haired beauty. He was a fighter too - tried to beat the fever that took him. lt was years ago. Robert was crazed, beat his hands bloody on the wall, all the things men do to show you how much they care. The boy looked just like him. Such a little thing. A bird without feathers. They came to take his body away and Robert held me. l screamed and l battled, but he held me. That little bundle. They took him away and l never saw him again. Never have visited the crypt, never." Watch the clip here. In s01e05 "The Wolf and the Lion" Cersei told Robert: "I felt something for you once, you know? Even after we lost our first boy. For quite a while, actually." Watch the clip here.In s01e04 "Cripples, Bastards, and Broken Things" Gendry told Ned Stark: "But then he started asking me about my mother. Who she was, what she looked like. She died when I was little. She had yellow hair. She'd sing to me sometimes."Watch the clip here.In s07e05 "Eastwatch", Gendry told Jon that he was a "fighter" too when they met. Watch that scene here.In the books, Cersei never loved Robert and she never bore him any children, having aborted one pregnancy long before it could come to term, so the showrunners made an intentional change to the story here. The conversation between Robert and Cersei is also their invention, not adapted from the book.Detractors from this theory believe that Cersei's story to Catelyn was just to express faux sympathy for Bran and to highlight the fact that Robert's children do have black hair --nothing more. Similarly, the "yellow hair" of Gendry's mother could simply be there to further emphasize Jon Arryn's statement that "the seed is strong" --strong enough for the black hair gene of the father to override a blonde gene on the mother's side, no matter who she is. Additionally, detractors cite the fact that Gendry told both Arya and Melisandre that his mother was just a "low-born, tavern wench", and they also cite Maggy the Frog's prophecy to young Cersei depicted in s05e01 "The Wars to Come" (here's the clip):CERSEI: "Will the king and I have children? MAGGY: "No. The king will have 20 children and you will have three. Gold will be their crowns. Gold their shrouds."However, in the show at least, Robert and Cersei did have a child together which seemingly contradicts this prophecy! The Game of Thrones wiki has an entry for "Baratheon (son of Robert)"which states: "Writer Bryan Cogman was directly asked about this with regard to Maggy's prophecy, and he indeed confirmed that Cersei's black-haired son with Robert simply isn't included in her 'official' count of children because he died in the cradle". This referenced a Watchers on the Wall article which stated: "I reached out to Bryan Cogman for comment, asking if there was, indeed, a continuity error, and he replied: 'No. Maggy’s just speaking of the three official kids who lived and were known, etc. The black haired baby was kept quiet.'” So that prophecy is a bit mutable... as prophecies tend to be.As for Gendry's mother being a tavern wench, perhaps that's just what he was told about her later... or, it was Cersei disguised as one because in the books Cersei came to Jaime in disguise, dressed as a tavern wench. She asked him: "Do you remember the first time I came to you like this? It was some dismal inn in Weasel Alley and I put on a servants garb to pass father's guards". ~Cersei, AFFC Jaime ISo how could Robert and Cersei's infant son have survived, and why? Someone who wanted to protect the child (from a jealous Jaime?) may have switched him out with a sickly one. In A Dance with Dragons, Varys claims to have switched Aegon V Targaryen, Rhaegar’s son, with another baby shortly before the Mountain killed Rhaegar’s family, so infant swaps have happened in this story. And speaking of Varys, I strongly suspect that that Gendry has been a strand in his Spider's web. In A Game of Thrones, we learn that Gendry's blacksmith mentor, Tobho Mott, took Gendry on as an apprentice after a mysterious man (likely Varys) paid him double the customary apprentice fee. In the books Varys arranged for Gendry's departure from King's Landing with the Night's Watch in order to escape the purge of Robert's bastards, as Varys is also very likely the one who informed Joffrey of the whereabouts of the other bastards and so was aware of that plan. Who else but Varys could have had such information? And Varys is a man of the people, looking out for their interests and prioritizing the peace and prosperity of the realm over any ruler --as he's claimed many times. I believe that he's had multiple "irons in the fire" so to speak in the hopes that one of them would pan out favorably as a good ruler that shares those values. Gendry may have been a back-up plan to the Targaryen restoration (until Varys just learned of Jon's real lineage that is). As commoner all of his life, Gendry would be sympathetic to the plight of common folk and probably become a benevolent ruler --which is what Varys truly desires. In s03e07 "The Bear and the Maiden Fair", Melisandre told Gendry of his true paternal lineage while they sailed to Dragonstone:"There, your father's house."<cue the royal Baratheon theme music as they look up at The Red Keep> "The bastard of Robert of the House Baratheon, First of His Name, King of the Andals and the First Men."Watch the clip here. Foreshadowing of much greater things to come? In a March interview with Men's Health magazine, Joe Dempsie (Gendry) said: "I just wanted answers about my character. I was the most curious as to what we might find out about Gendry's parentage. Obviously, we know that he was the bastard of Robert Baratheon, but who might his mother have been? "There's a line in season one, and it's a first scene you ever see of Gendry, where he's looking to Ned and he's asked about his mother, and he says he doesn't remember much about her at all, other than the fact that she had yellow hair and she would sing to him. It's one of those things where you go, 'Do they usually write lines that don't mean anything, or lines that seem to have significance that [are] never addressed again?' I was kind of intrigued to see what that might mean, and what impact that might have on Gendry's clout politically." Later that same month, Maisie Williams (Arya) told Entertainment Weekly: “After reading the scripts I went back and watched season 1 again because so much of it refers back to that season.” It's possible that these are hints which will pertain to R+C=G, or the callbacks to Season 1 are just about visual details and parallels like the Winterfell crypts, the royal procession into Winterfell, etc. and that may be all that Maisie was talking about. Contextually, Dempsie was also speaking about indulging in cast members' theories so his comments may not pertain to the script and the actual outcome.
  23. Astrotherapist

    Aegon Targaryen and the IT

    I have some additional thoughts about this but first let's revisit the basic definition of "bittersweet." Merriam-Webster: "Pleasure accompanied by suffering or regret" dictionary.com: "Both pleasant and painful or regretful" wiktionary: "Expressing contrasting emotions of pain and pleasure." I've read The Lord of the Rings approximately twenty times (since my first reading in 1981) and it has a generally happy ending. The only casualties were two, corrupt "grey" characters (the kind Martin loves) Boromir and Denethor dead, and one good, minor character in Theoden, also slain. The rest of the Fellowship and their allies had very happy endings except maybe Frodo who had sustained an ostensibly permanent, psychic wound to his shoulder from the Morgul knife, and the Ring left its mark as well. But then he sailed to an elven paradise where peace and final healing could be had. That's what he desired and he loved the elves. Martin didn't actually say that The Lord of the Rings has a bittersweet ending, nor that his ending would be like the Lord of the Rings, but that a couple of aspects of the victory against Sauron were bittersweet (to him) citing the specific examples of Frodo's situation and the Scouring of the Shire chapter --when the hobbits returned from war only to find that their homeland was trashed by Saruman --a bitter twist, but one soon set to rights. Martin is shooting for the "tone" of those two items from LotR but in no way will the losses match -they can't- GRRM has killed more main and side characters than Tolkien. The ending will be bittersweet in that some characters will live and find good outcomes, some will die, tragically, and perhaps one will survive but exit the Kingdoms, brokenhearted for a while yet life will go on. This last outcome, I think, will be Jon's fate.
  24. Astrotherapist

    Aegon Targaryen and the IT

    I've stayed away from leaks this season. I never read the LotR part of that quote so I looked it up. The number one question people ask me about the series is whether I think everyone will lose—whether it will end in some horrible apocalypse. I know you can’t speak to that specifically, but as a revisionist of epic fantasy—
 "I haven’t written the ending yet, so I don’t know, but no. That’s certainly not my intent. I’ve said before that the tone of the ending that I’m going for is bittersweet. I mean, it’s no secret that Tolkien has been a huge influence on me, and I love the way he ended Lord of the Rings. It ends with victory, but it’s a bittersweet victory. Frodo is never whole again, and he goes away to the Undying Lands, and the other people live their lives. And the scouring of the Shire—brilliant piece of work, which I didn’t understand when I was 13 years old: “Why is this here? The story’s over?” But every time I read it I understand the brilliance of that segment more and more. All I can say is that’s the kind of tone I will be aiming for. Whether I achieve it or not, that will be up to people like you and my readers to judge." https://observer.com/2015/08/george-r-r-martins-ending-for-game-of-thrones-will-not-be-as-brutal-as-you-think/ and “I think you need to have some hope…we all yearn for happy endings in a sense. Myself, I’m attracted to the bittersweet ending. People ask me how Game of Thrones is gonna end, and I’m not gonna tell them … but I always say to expect something bittersweet in the end,” he said. “You can’t just fulfill a quest and then pretend life is perfect.” http://time.com/4101276/game-of-thrones-ending-george-r-r-martin/ If Aejon=Frodo, two characters who bear emotional and even physical scars, then I believe that Jon will end up north of the Wall (where his heart is) as I've predicted, and as the parallel to Frodo sailing away to a peaceful place.
×