Jump to content

Jaime the Goldenhand

Members
  • Content count

    33
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Jaime the Goldenhand

  1. The concept of sociological story telling is a useful concept to analyze narratives, but I think the idea of a shift towards psychological story telling is the wrong way to frame the issue in GOT. To me, the first seasons, and indeed the books, have both a strong psychological AND sociological element. We have characters that feel like they have real inner layers to them, layers they are not always aware of, but that are revealed through their actions and streams of consciousness. At the same time, they are placed in a realistic world that also reacts to them in a meaningful way. The show just removed the sociological element because it is too hard to write that kind of material. You have to let the restrictions of the logic of the established rules CONSTRAIN your choices for the characters. GRRM takes a long time to write because he goes over many possible scenarios and considers how they would influence the greater plot. The show never did that post season 4.
  2. Jaime the Goldenhand

    The heartless subtext thread...

    Agreed. It is unlikely that the Citadel has any power at all by the end of the series. It seems unlikely that the Maesters would be happy with how things played out. They seemed very culturally conservative, and strict in their adherence to custom. My money would be on them plotting against Bran. Also, there is no undeniable proof that the Army of the Dead ever existed, that Jon was a Targ, and that Dragonglass did anything. Only the word of people who were there. A successful disinformation campaign could turn that on its head. It would have been nice to consider these elements and show how these characters positions are not firmly cemented, but actually rather precarious.
  3. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Suggestions/Scenes to Improve Season 8

    So, I've been enjoying hating on this show for almost 4 seasons now. One thing I like to do is reimagine scenes, scenarios differently given the current state of the show. Now that we know the beginning and end points of all of the characters in season 8, how would you have manuvered them different. What scenes were missing/could be changed for the better? I would've liked it to be hinted at that Dany Warged into Drogon at the end. It would've been nice to see her give up on her dream for the iron throne after even her lover turns on her. I would've like to imagine Dany regretting her actions. I think the transition could've been done with clever camera movements between Danny's eyes closing and Drogon's opening. Dany's last word could be Drogon, mirroring Jon. In dragon form, she decides not to kill Jon, showing that she understands why he had to kill her. She burns the Iron Throne, showing her renunciation of the desire that drove her to madness and flies off to the Dothraki sea to live out the rest of her life underneath her Sun and Stars. It would've been so beautiful to know that Dany was living out a life with power, but choosing peace. That could've been really beautiful to get a shot of her flying over the long grass with a wild white horse, reminscent of the one she recieved from Drogo, galloping along underneath her. Free and redeemed.
  4. Jaime the Goldenhand

    The heartless subtext thread...

    King's don't have that much sway in the citadel. It is unlikely that Sam would even be accepted as an apprentice after the impression he made, also stealing books. It is also very likely that the citadel would be antagonistic towards Bran. He is a magical telepath, seer, and Warg. The citadel is full of men of a science who stilll view such things as superstition. I'm sure they would want one of their own to keep an eye on Bran. But again, all subtlety and consistency is thrown to the wind for the show. Sam deserves it because he is written as a good character, devoid of any depth or conflict. Of course he should be Grand Maester, he's familiar. I recognize him. I like him. Give him a job. Turn off your brain and smile. Happy endings!
  5. Jaime the Goldenhand

    The Ending Was very conventional

    Ok, so I think the show was trying to get at the idea that Kings are human, they are guided by their own fears (mad king), desires (Bobby b), motives (Dany), lust (Euron), etc. By putting Bran, the least human character, on the Throne, you kind of circumvent this problem. However, this is only possible if someone like Bran exists. But, like I said. The show is TRYING to say that. But, having Tyrion talk about 'stories' and having Bran's small council populated by his buddies and giving the North to Sansa without question REALLY nullifies this point. The books very effectively make the above point. I'm sure that the ending will reflect the benefits, and also problems, of having an inhuman king. I wouldn't be surprised if Bran is portrayed as a sort of Dr.Mahattan character, who is too dissociated from humanity to feel a close emotional connection to anyone. There are a lot of interesting elements to explore with Bran as ruler. Will he instituted more environmental policies? How will he manage relations with the North? Is he truly impartial? Will the common folk fear him? The show inevitably just TELLS us, that Bran will be good, because he is a 'keeper of stories' and holds the realms memory...wtf does that mean? That's what I mean when they don't have anything to say about politics, because they never attempt to SHOW us any of the implications of the new royal order. We are simply TOLD that it will be good.
  6. Jaime the Goldenhand

    West of Westeros: The Voyages of A. Stark

    I get it. You like Arya. She is very bad-ass. Personally, I don't like the way she is portrayed in the show, while she is one of my favorites in the books. The ethos of the first 3-4 seasons, which is very consistent with the books is that: ACTIONS HAVE CONSEQUENCES Of course many characters would all like to cathartically murder everyone who has wronged us in the past. However, there are issues with this kind of reactionary brutality. We have to live with ourselves, we have to accept that someone else will be coming to take their vengeance on us, we have to dedicate time and resources to enacting out revenge. Arya's story is devoid of these critical aspects. That's why it is best classed as revenge porn. Frey pie is poetic justice, but it comes at no cost. None of this callousness you mention comes across in the performance of the character. No one watching the show would ever question whether they would like to be like Arya. Hell yeah! Why not?! Super bad-ass, powerful, unflinching, loyal. Where is there any dimension to her character? I get that the flawless heroine is a popular trope these days. But it just doesn't do a thing for me. Boring character, undeserved non-ending to her non-arc.
  7. Jaime the Goldenhand

    West of Westeros: The Voyages of A. Stark

    Yes! I completely agree. Arya needs to have a moment of reckoning. She never had this in the show. I think they were going for this with confronting Nymeria, but it just didn't have any weightI. It is a very forgettable scene. Sometimes I wonder if they excluded this because Maisie isn't capable of giving a layered performance. But, at least she could try and confess something to Sansa instead of keeping everything hidden. The whole concept of the pack survives, to me, entails supporting one another, not just being on screen at the same time.
  8. Ok. The majority of the kingdom isn't dead. People gossip, people care about what is happening, people are generally misinformed. Don't you remember the riot back in season 2? Do you remember that it was caused by rumors? Do you remember how unpopular Tyrion was? Do you remember him wishing that all of the nobles in KL would die? It sure would be convenient if EVERY SINGLE PERSON that attended or even heard about the trial was dead. Tyrion was imprisoned for disagreeing with Dany AFTER THE FACT. Do you remember what happened the Jaime for disagreeing with a King and actually doing something about it. Do you remember how his reputation haunted him for most of his adult life. Public opinion mattered at one point in the story. It is conveniently forgotten when fan-favorites need to get their happy ending.
  9. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Purpose of the wall now ?

    I wonder if he truly thinks that the North leaving the kingdom is good for ALL PEOPLE in Westeros. It sure seems to benefit the Stark a whole lot, raising them permanently to Kings and Queens of their own impenetrable (by land) kingdom. Also, he just gave away 1/3 of the land mass of the kingdom. I'm sure no one will mind. It might have been nice to actually SHOW Bran doing something selfless. What would a government run by someone sees the world in such a seemingly neutral way look like?
  10. Precisely, the common people have no idea that he didn't kill Joffery. They only know that he was Dany's hand. I'm not talking about what he did or didn't do. I'm saying that the majority of the kingdom, unlike the audience of the show who can't find any fault in him, would hate his guts. There is no way they would trust him as Bran's hand. He got way more than should ever logically receive. Hell, he even gets to decide the new system of government IN CHAINS! Tyrion getting to be hand is fan service, plain and simple.
  11. Jaime the Goldenhand

    The Ending Was very conventional

    Completely agree. This ending achieved nothing, didn't challenge anything. It was a complete cookie cutter ending that didn't bring any sense of closure to any particular part of the story. 1. So it was all about choosing the RIGHT king. Wow, what a fucking waste of 8 seasons. Bran is a good king because he is impotent and has a good story...wtf...most of the common people would never even believe his story if they heard it. He's going to be a good leader because he fatalistically accepts everything that happens around him. How will he negotiate with Winterfell given that he is a Stark? Won't this bother any of the other lords? 2. There is now an extra wheel. The North 3. Foreigners go back to foreign land or just disappear. They had no agency or purpose other than to FOLLOW DANY. It was the equivalent of the Army of the Dead all collapsing after NK died. 4. Sansa just leaves the Seven kingdoms with no consequences at all. I guess no one else really GETS the North you know... 5. Brienne commits the noble lie, protecting the common folk and future King's Guard from the terrifying truth that is Jamie's botched story line. He sure did protect his queen from all those falling rocks. This story didn't have anything interesting to say about medieval politics. It just made us familiar with a bunch of characters and then put them in all the positions of power so that we would be happy about it. Barely any of it made any logical sense and Westeros is no better or worse than when we started. All the political intrigue played itself out until there was none left. We are left with the impression that none of the lords of Westeros have any vested interest in how their country is run. They blindly accept the new king. I suppose Westeros is run by people like D&D who just don't give a fuck. This is a non-ending, with no real change from the beginning.
  12. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Use one word to describe the series finale.

    Torture.
  13. Show, don't tell. The show constantly tells us one thing while showing us another. We're discussing happy endings. Tyrion definitely got that. Not only is he given a chance to redeem all of his past wrong-doing, but he is literally given the job, recognition, and power that he always wanted. Everyone in the story lost loved ones, friends, family, but only Tyrion never had to pay the price for any of the bad decisions he made. St. Tyrion may repent for his trespasses. Consider that Tyrion is a man guilty of patricide, accused of regicide, who was also hand to the genocidal Dany, it's a small miracle that the common people have enough compassion to even let him try to redeem himself. This is the happiest, most white-washed possible ending for Tyrion. So much for, "if you lose the Game of Thrones you die". Nope. You just a redo, but you're sad about the whole thing.
  14. Jaime the Goldenhand

    West of Westeros: The Voyages of A. Stark

    Yes, Arya is a very human character... I'm vividly reminded of her humanity as stabs this man's eyes out and then proceeds to stab him to death in the chest. I also feel deeply the humanity of the character as she feeds a man his children. She is never made to confront these gruesome acts of violence. She's just too bad-ass to feel real consequences for her actions. This is not a probably unique to Arya. The show in general doesn't pay any attention to the consequences of being a violent person. The fact she needs the hound to tell her this at all suggests that she has never reflected on the gravity on what she became; a monster. However briefly, this was never resolved. For that reason, I don't think her sailing happily into the sunset was earned at all.
  15. Yeah, Tyrion seems absolutely miserable cracking jokes on the small council with all his buddies. It was so melancholy when he started telling his joke about the jackass and the honeycomb. Though I suppose it was really tragic when everyone ruined the chairs that he so nicely arranged around the table.
  16. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Dany CAN (And Shall???) Rise Again!!!

    It would have been really cool to see the following scene: We follow a procession of red priests on a pilgrimage to attend the dragon queen's funeral. On a barren mountain top amid the Dothraki sea a funeral pyre is being constructed by the priests who have already arrived, following the path of burnt and charred remains of animals and grass. Above the pyre Drogon sits, surveying the funeral preparations as the red priests occasionally glance up nervously as they go about their work. Eventually, a massive gathering of people has amassed to pay tribute to their alleged savior, who was bitterly betrayed by the faithless western lords. Kinvara leads the chanting, beckoning followers to come forward to avenge the death of their god's chosen vessel who was wrongfully murdered by Bran the Broken; agent of the great other from beyond the wall. AS the funeral pyre is being lit and Dany's body is being placed atop it, a stranger emerges from the crowd carrying a large ornate chest and carefully open it and places the contents into the heart of the pyre. As the smoke begins to rise and the flames engulf Dany's body, we hear Drogon let out of earth-shattering roar. From deep within the rising flames we hear the another roar, a smaller fainter echo, as another generation of dragons is born into the world.
  17. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Bran Truly Was The Best Possible Choice To Rule

    HA! Tyrion can handle him? Did you miss the part where Bronn basically extorts an ENTIRE KINGDOM from him. Now, Lord Bronn wants to publicly subsidize brothels. Tyrion controls him by telling a joke about a brothel. Bronn has been riding rough-shot over Tyrion since Tyrion was made hand the first time. D&D like Bronn because he is the only character 1 dimensional enough for them to write good material for. That's it.
  18. Jaime the Goldenhand

    Foreshadowing of Dany's Death from S02

    Yeah, I think Dany is happy in the night lands along with all of the burnt corpses of the Dosh Khaleen that she murdered because she didn't want to follow the traditional rites of the culture that she married into (granted she was forced into married, but eventually accepted and embraced the Dothraki culture). I'm sure she still holds the same faith that she did when she was married to Drogo.
  19. Agree. Jon and Dany's love is so sudden and forced, when they aren't appearing on screen together, I barely remember that they are supposed to be a couple. They had a couple good fucks on a boat. Oh, and dragon riding date. They barely have any reason to even like each other, let alone want to die for one another.
  20. Haha, yeah I read that. Half the comments are about Jon petting Ghost! Major win.
  21. Jaime the Goldenhand

    West of Westeros: The Voyages of A. Stark

    Arya really needed to have a complete emotional breakdown at some point. I remember ironically watching 24 as a drinking game with friends at uni. It was a really silly show where Jack Bower doles out violence and patriotically poetic justice to EVIL terrorists. It was dumb, fun, ideological propaganda at its finest. EXCEPT at the end of season 3, after saving the world beyond all odds, getting tortured several times, murdering countless people, Jack goes out into his car and just break down weeping. At least she could have confronted Sansa and tearfully recounted all the nasty things she's done, try to get some kind of acceptance. This might be a misguided way to write a "strong female character" by simply writing a stereotypical "male action hero" and then having a woman read the lines. We really needed this from Arya. She hasn't been a human character for almost 4 seasons now, she has simply been a vessel for sadistic violence revenge on the characters that the audience see as EVIL. Jack Bower's bad-ass persona was revealed to be a MASK that hides his inner turmoil, guilt, despair, doubt, etc. Even a silly show like 24 produced a more 3D character than GOT. Arya should have: a) Faced her emotional trauma before simply leaving everything behind and running away on an "adventure" b) Eluded to the idea that she plans to die at sea, recognizing that she is too far gone, she cannot atone, she cannot apologize, the world doesn't need another killer
  22. This happened in the last episode of the show. She threatens to cut Yara's throat for talking negatively about her family. Remember this is the same person who murdered two people and fed them to their own father. We can enjoy the Arya revenge porn because the men she is murdering have been portrayed as objectively EVIL, therefore, there murder is justified. It's also interesting to remember that the Red Wedding was not completely unjustified. It is tragic because it is a result of Robb's underestimating of the Frey's and his arrogant attempt to undo a slight that couldn't be undone. Arya never regrets her choices, she never attempts to atone, and she is never psychological affected by her violent actions. She just becomes bad-ass, suffenly decides to not kill Cersei because that would SUDDENLY have some negative effect on her. Somehow, after not even feeding people to their own parents seemed to get to her in the slightest. Give me a break. Then she sets sail for more adventures! Hopefully, when she arrives in the new world nobody looks at her the wrong way or she'll gouge their eyes out.
  23. Here's another question. Is Bran capable of having agency? He seems to operate on a purely fatalistic level. He sees how things will be and is powerless to act any differently. If this is the case, he can't be said to have any morality. He can't choose and therefore cannot act. Compare this to the most obvious corollary: Muad'dib. Paul (from Dune) is able to hazily glimpse multiple futures, these can then inform his actions. When he finds a thread, or possible sequence of events, he is able to follow them to their conclusion, should he so choose. Bran does not seem capable of this. Bran is a non-agent. How can someone like this honestly be seen as a good ruler.
  24. Ok, why did Bran NEED to tell Jon his parentage IN ORDER to have Jon kill Dany. It seems that telling Jon led to further conflict between him and Dany. If Dany hadn't felt insecure about her claim, she might not have burned KL. But, KL did burn and then Jon needed to be the one to kill Dany, effectively leading to his exile and Bran becoming King. It seems like, if Bran didn't tell Jon anything at all, he and Dany would have been the one's the rule the 7 kingdoms. If Dany was DESTINED (or some nonsense) to be mad and needed to be killed, couldn't it have been anyone else? Did it have to be Jon? Couldn't Bran help Varys' plot to poison her before reaching KL? Too many logical alternative possibilities? Does this not follow? Everything else remaining the same (which is a stretch), didn't Bran's actions simply lead to him becoming King, while leading to unnecessary death and destruction?
  25. Bran foresaw the problem. Brought his own chair.
×