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Nadden

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  1. At the beginning of our story a recently anointed Knight and newly sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch Ser Waymar Royce journeys north into the haunted forest where he appears to face off one on one in a duel to the death. He’s wounded then seemly butchered. I believe his broken sword tells us more. There’s an old childhood saying that goes like this, “Cross my heart, hope to die, stick a needle in my eye”. The saying is a pledge by a person swearing the oath that they are indeed telling the truth. And should they be lying than they hope to die and that their death would be verified by a needle in the eye. Long ago the idea of sticking “a needle in the eye” was done on corpses. It was a custom to make sure that someone wasn’t still alive before they were buried. Children simply took the idea and used it as part of a pledge to tell the truth. Leave it to kids to take something so morbid and attach it to a noble pledge to ensure honor. In our story there’s a moment just before Waymar is seemly butchered that he, figuratively, gets “a needle in his eye”. I’ll explain… Martin must have had this pledge in mind while writing the AGOT, Prologue. After Waymar appears to be butchered, Will eventually finds his courage. He climbs down from the tree. He sees Waymar lying facedown dead and the end of his sword a few feet away. Warily looking around, Will knelt to snatch up the broken sword and when he rose as did Waymar. It’s at this point that we see the figurative needle in his eye. Here’s the quote, From this passage it’s not immediately obvious that the shard is, figuratively, a needle. Our author obscures this detail in a bygone passage. Here it is, The phrase “like a rain of needles”, a simile, directly compares the scattering “shards” of Waymar’s sword to “a rain of needles”. One of the shards from that sword finds its’ way into Waymar’s eye. That shard is from the “rain of needles”. Thus, figuratively, a needle in his eye. Martin’s deliberate separation of the literal object from its figurative counterpart seems to give weight to the idea that this is an important connection being made. The simile, “like a rain of needles” comes while Waymar’s longsword is shattering or being destroyed but the lone needle is not reveal until Waymar’s apparent resurrection. The placement of the two aspects of this idea may be telling as it parallels Waymar’s death and resurrection. In fact, it’s Waymar‘s death pose which may give us the “Cross my heart,…” moment, the first part of the that old childhood pledge of honor. But what seems certain at this point is that Waymar broke his promise.
  2. This is a good point. Jeor Mormont take a more lenient approach to Jon Snow’s desertion, presumably Ned’s Stark’s son, than Ned takes with Jorah. Why?
  3. Here’s a clue about the needles, Our newly anointed Knight and freshly sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch Ser Waymar Royce journeys north into the haunted forest where he appears to face off one on one in a duel to the death. He gets wounded and seemly butchered. But his sword tells a different story. Did Ser Waymar Royce break his oath? Did he hope to die? Was he suicidal or just willing to sacrifice himself? There’s an old childhood saying that goes like this, “Cross my heart, hope to die, stick a needle in my eye”. The saying decrees that a needle be stuck in an eye of someone to ensure that they are indeed dead should that person break their word. In our story there’s a moment just before Waymar is seemly butchered that he, figuratively, gets a needle in his eye. If this is true what does it mean? Was Waymar lying? Why? Did Martin have this pledge in mind while writing the AGOT, Prologue? Somewhere I read that long ago the idea of sticking “a needle in the eye” was done by adults on corpses. It was a custom to make sure that someone wasn’t still alive before they were buried. Children took the idea and used it as part of a pledge to tell the truth. Leave it to kids to take something so morbid and attach it to a noble pledge to ensure honor. After Waymar appears to be butchered, Will eventually finds his courage. He climbs down from the tree. He sees Waymar lying facedown dead and the end of his sword a few feet away. Warily looking around, Will knelt to snatch up the broken sword and when he rose so did Waymar. It’s at this point that we see the figurative needle in his eye. Here’s the quote, From this passage it’s not immediately obvious that the shard is, figuratively, a needle. Our author obscures this detail in a bygone passage. Here it is, The phrase “like a rain of needles”, a simile, directly compares the scattering “shards” to “needles”. The shard in Waymar’s eye is from his sword and the same set of shards that, just moments before, were figuratively described as “needles”. Thus a figurative needle in his eye. Martin’s deliberate separation of the literal object from its figurative counterpart seems to give weight to the idea that this is an important connection being made. The simile, “like a rain of needles” comes during the death of Ser Waymar Royce’s longsword but is not reveal until Waymar’s apparent resurrection. The placement of the two aspects of this idea may be telling. In fact, it’s Waymar‘s death pose which gives us the “Cross my heart,…” moment, the first part of the that old childhood pledge of honor. Here again our author brings together a facet of death and the idea of a child. Waymar’s death pose is a variation of Child’s pose, a basic yoga position. I know the Child pose, seems a bit of a stretch for Martin, pun intended, so I’ll explain. In the actual pose one rests on their knees, resting their buttocks against their heels. They bow forward lowering their upper body onto their thighs and their forehead to the mat with both arms extended out. The variation brings one arm under (“threads”) across one’s chest, crossing their heart. This is, figuratively, the “Cross my heart,…” moment. Let’s compare this to the description of Waymar’s death pose, The description is vague. So let’s ask a question. Why would Will think Waymar looks young? Waymar is facedown in the snow, his cloak splayed out over him displaying slashes in a dozen places. The answer, because Will is considering his body position. Like any good crime scene investigator worth their weight knows, the position of the body is important. And true to Martin’s pattern of revealing his clues he divides the information up. First Waymar drops to his knees shrieking still alive. Then Will sees him dead several paragraphs later facedown with one arm out-flung. The fact that Martin is deliberately making it difficult for the reader to fully conceptualize Waymar’s death pose by spreading out the details is reason again to feel confident that this is an important connection being made. According to the old pledge of honor and based on the discoveries to this point Waymar “…hoped to die…“. But Why? And why does the “…stick a needle in my eye.” moment and the “Cross my heart,…” moment appear out of order?
  4. Our newly anointed Knight and freshly sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch Ser Waymar Royce journeys north into the haunted forest where he appears to face off one on one in a duel to the death. He gets wounded and seemly butchered. But his sword tells a different story. Did Ser Waymar Royce break his oath? Did he hope to die? Was he suicidal or just willing to sacrifice himself? There’s an old childhood saying that goes like this, “Cross my heart, hope to die, stick a needle in my eye”. The saying decrees that a needle be stuck in an eye of someone to ensure that they are indeed dead should that person break their word. In our story there’s a moment just before Waymar is seemly butchered that he, figuratively, gets a needle in his eye. If this is true what does it mean? Was Waymar lying? Why? Did Martin have this pledge in mind while writing the AGOT, Prologue? Somewhere I read that long ago the idea of sticking “a needle in the eye” was done by adults on corpses. It was a custom to make sure that someone wasn’t still alive before they were buried. Children took the idea and used it as part of a pledge to tell the truth. Leave it to kids to take something so morbid and attach it to a noble pledge to ensure honor. After Waymar appears to be butchered, Will eventually finds his courage. He climbs down from the tree. He sees Waymar lying facedown dead and the end of his sword a few feet away. Warily looking around, Will knelt to snatch up the broken sword and when he rose so did Waymar. It’s at this point that we see the figurative needle in his eye. Here’s the quote, From this passage it’s not immediately obvious that the shard is, figuratively, a needle. Our author obscures this detail in a bygone passage. Here it is, The phrase “like a rain of needles”, a simile, directly compares the scattering “shards” to “needles”. The shard in Waymar’s eye is from his sword and the same set of shards that, just moments before, were figuratively described as “needles”. Thus a figurative needle in his eye. Martin’s deliberate separation of the literal object from its figurative counterpart seems to give weight to the idea that this is an important connection being made. The simile, “like a rain of needles” comes during the death of Ser Waymar Royce’s longsword but is not reveal until Waymar’s apparent resurrection. The placement of the two aspects of this idea may be telling. In fact, it’s Waymar‘s death pose which gives us the “Cross my heart,…” moment, the first part of the that old childhood pledge of honor. Here again our author brings together a facet of death and the idea of a child. Waymar’s death pose is a variation of Child’s pose, a basic yoga position. I know the Child pose, seems a bit of a stretch for Martin, pun intended, so I’ll explain. In the actual pose one rests on their knees, resting their buttocks against their heels. They bow forward lowering their upper body onto their thighs and their forehead to the mat with both arms extended out. The variation brings one arm under (“threads”) across one’s chest, crossing their heart. This is, figuratively, the “Cross my heart,…” moment. Let’s compare this to the description of Waymar’s death pose, The description is vague. So let’s ask a question. Why would Will think Waymar looks young? Waymar is facedown in the snow, his cloak splayed out over him displaying slashes in a dozen places. The answer, because Will is considering his body position. Like any good crime scene investigator worth their weight knows, the position of the body is important. And true to Martin’s pattern of revealing his clues he divides the information up. First Waymar drops to his knees shrieking still alive. Then Will sees him dead several paragraphs later facedown with one arm out-flung. The fact that Martin is deliberately making it difficult for the reader to fully conceptualize Waymar’s death pose by spreading out the details is reason again to feel confident that this is an important connection being made. According to the old pledge of honor and based on the discoveries to this point Waymar “…hoped to die…“. But Why? And why does the “…stick a needle in my eye.” moment and the “Cross my heart,…” moment appear out of order? At the end of Ser Waymar Royce’s death scene he is on his knees face down in the snow with one arm out-flung. After analyzing the text I’ve concluded that Waymar’s death pose is actually a basic yoga pose. Will, the crime scene investigator in this case, thinks… “A boy”, a male child, is an interesting thought by Will. Why?….Why when Waymar is face down does Will think he looks young? Why when his long thick sable cloak splayed out over him displaying a dozen slashes is Will thinking, “A boy”. Like a good crime scene investigator Will is noting the position of the body. It might seem like a stretch but Martin has arranged Waymar’s dead body in Child’s pose. Children are a developing central theme in ASOIAF at this point. The pose I’m submitting beginning with Child’s pose has a common variation called Thread the needle which completes Waymar’s death pose. Thread the Needle also happens to be connected to that central theme. It’s children's game in which the participants stand in a line and hold hands. It’s hilarious but this yoga stuff has all the makings of Martin’s sense of humor. Much like in the next chapter when Jon mutters a curse at Theon calling him an “Ass”. Then later, after being tortured by Ramsey Snow Theon is renamed Reek. In our yoga pose Waymar’s arm would literally be referred to as the needle. When performing the pose one goes to their knees and lowers their forehead down on the mat arms out-stretched in front of them. Then twisting, threads an arm or figuratively the needle across their chest and beneath the other arm. Take a look at the very first line in the very next paragraph following “A boy”, Analyzing this passage one might ask why doesn’t Martin just say “hilt” since that’s what he’s talking about? Why call it “the end”?….That’s eventually the question I asked myself after arriving at some other conclusions. Early on, I noted that throughout the Prologue that Waymar’s actions parallel the actions of his sword hilt. In fact, I determined that he’s the objectification of his sword hilt or his sword hilt is a personification of him, either way. Take a look at the initial descriptions of him and the hilt of his longsword, Now consider Ser Waymar Royce’s initial description: So, Ser Waymar Royce was a (splendid) handsome young son of Bronze Yohn, Lord of Runestone, with glittering grey eyes. He was a (castle-forged) Knight, and a (new-made) sworn Brother of the Night’s Watch. Likely, he had never been in a real fight. In fact, Martin directly compares him to a “knife”, calling him slender. Further confirmation of this idea comes in the study of both Gared and Will, the other two rangers in the prologue. They too are the objectification of their weapon hilts. And the Other follows the same pattern. The point I’m making is that “A boy” has another connotation. Waymar, “a boy”, is the objectification of his sword, specifically “the end” of his broken sword. “The end” and “A boy” are synonymous. It’s why when Will snatched up the broken sword that he and Waymar both rose. Here’s the quote, Read what happens when the two phrases are swapped for each other. Lying dead like that, you saw how young he was. (The end). And, He found what was left of the sword a few feet away, (a boy) splintered and twisted like a tree struck by lightning.(Prologue, AGOT) In the first passage we’re seeing how two one-syllable words, once a traditional way to end a story, are used to indicate Waymar’s life or song being over. “The end”. In the second passage we’re seeing the use of the two adjectives, splintered and twisted modifying, in this case, “a boy” to perfectly illustrate both Waymar’s death and yoga pose. “The end” of the “splintered” sword, the origin of the steel splinters that Martin previously calls “a rain of needles”, is “twisted”. “Twisted” like “a boy” threading the needle in our yoga pose. This is a piece of the yoga motif that has likely already begun and persists moving forward and is something that deserves further exploration. Briefly, my thoughts expand to a puppy and a dead mother direwolf in the next chapter. Puppy and Downward Facing Dog are the next two poses following the Child’s pose. Additionally, a Warrior pose and Hero’s pose could likely precede and describe Waymar’s sword “on high” and the moment he went to his knees. But first I’d like to focus on the last part of the quote from above. At the end of the quote Martin directly compares the sword end to a tree struck by lightning. So if Waymar’s sword hilt, a personification him, is a figurative tree stump; than the figurative lightning would seem to be the blade of the sword of the Other. The blade of the sword because, like Waymar, the Other’s sword hilt is likely a personification of it. Furthermore, if Waymar’s sword hilt is, figuratively, a tree stump than the blade is the tree that “shivered into a hundred brittle pieces” by the strike. And a shiver, which can be a noun, is a fragment or splinter than they would be a perfect metaphor for the shards, that Martin describes as “a rain of needles”. A shivering tree or shivering timber sounds much like an exclamation in the form of a mock oath as stated in the phrase, “shiver me Timbers”. It’s usually attributed to the speech of pirates in works of fiction. It is employed as a literary device by authors to express shock, surprise, or annoyance. We see this in the lightning strike. The phrase is based on real nautical slang and is a reference to the timbers, which are the wooden support frames of a sailing ship. In heavy seas, ships would be lifted up and pounded down so hard as to "shiver" the timbers, startling the sailors. Such an exclamation was meant to convey a feeling of fear and awe, “Shiver" is also reminiscent of the splintering of a ship's timbers in battle – splinter wounds were a common form of battle injury on wooden ships. Shiver can also be used as an expression of being "cold to the bone".
  5. Coppice- an area of woodland in which the trees are, or formerly were, periodically cut back to ground level to stimulate growth and provide firewood or timber. I mentioned before that Gared, who’s name is not mentioned in Bran 1, AGOT, is a figurative drag half (derag is Gared spelled backwards) of a sand and oil cast mold for “Ice”(metallurgy). A cope is the top half. Cope or similarly Copp combines with “Ice” in Gared’s beheading scene. Coppice(Ironwood stump), as defined above, combines “Ice” and copp( like cope). Gared’s head was forced down onto the hard black wood. Bran’s father, Lord Stark, took off the Gared’s head with a single sure stroke. Blood sprayed out across the snow, as red as summerwine. 1375–1425; late Middle English copies<Middle French copeis,Old French copeiz<Vulgar Latin *colpātīcium cutover area, equivalent to *colpāt(us) past participle of *colpāre to cut (see coup 1) + -īcium-ice.
  6. I believe that Gared’s head and the hilt of his sword is a chremamorphism. The blade of the sword is his tongue. Together the hilt and the blade are a sword. Someone can I have a “sharp tongue”. Some can “hold their tongue” Some can “bite their tongue” Some have “a silver tongue” Some have “Guarded tongue” I think of tongue and the head make words—-swords and words right? I think Seams made that connection. So Gared sword, So in this paragraph I believe the hilt of Gared’s sword is covered by the shadow of his cape or hand but Will could still see the gems on the sword as they glittered in the moonlight. For a moment Will thought Gared would say something. Gared had a short and ugly temper. Gared’s face was discolored and sweating (alcoholic) and scarred (missing ears). But Will would not have said one word if Gared would have lost his temper. But Gared didn’t. He held his tongue. Teeth can guard your words or tongue. Teeth can also chatter. In the Bran 1 chapter, Gared tongue is destroyed. But in this case a sword is a euphemism for penis. Like a male being castrated a sword is cast. I posted before that Gared is derag spelled backwards and that a drag(A homophone for derag) is the bottom half of the mold for casting a sword. Oily sand is used in the casting of a sword. That’s why Gared is greasy. “Ragged” if said with only one syllable like someone wearing a cape. A cape is like a cope the top half of the mold for casting. Funny that Rob will be about a head taller than Gared soon. Rob wants the Others to take his eyes(Gems). Gared will be castrated or recast in the name of Just Ice. Gared head is a testicle. Theon kicked it! Ouch!
  7. Love the compass idea. Snarling iron is a metallurgy technique. A snarl is a metal worker's tool used to drive the walls of metal vessels. A snarler... is a worker. I think this may go with the runes on a clock or compass. Later in the chapter we find Waymar’s face , Tatters emboss skin and a snarler(Waymar) emboss metal. Clocks and compasses have runes on the faces and Waymar’s face is a ruin. “ Branches like fingers(of the Old Gods) grabbing out at a needle and cloth or a cloak and longsword (metaphor for Waymar). Waymar is a chememorphism for his sword. So Waymar threads, with the sound of a soft metallic slither, through a thicket.
  8. After reading a post by Evolett on Lady Forlorn I think I made a connection I wanted to share. In the Prologue of AGOT during the duel between Waymar and the Other we read, In the first dueling scene, Waymar’s blood “seemed red as fire”. But because of the lack of light and the Purkinje effect the blood, that “steamed in the cold” would actually appear black. So the color of the blood, and figuratively fire, on the pale sword, wielded by the Other, that bit through Waymar’s ringmail would appear to be black and smoking. Are we figuratively looking at the Valyrian steel sword Blackfyre once belonging to Aegon the Conqueror. What about the sword that was a beat too late, the one belonging to Waymar? What would the name of that sword figuratively be? Blackfyre once dueled with Lady Forlorn during the First Blackfyre Rebellion, Lady Forlorn was wielded by Ser Gwayne Corbray, a knight of the Kingsguard for Daeron Targaryen during the Battle of the Redgrass Field. Gwayne fought Daemon I Blackfyre, once Daemon Waters, who wielded Blackfyre. Side note: The name “Daemon” seems like a bit of wordplay for Mon dae or Moon day, the day after Sunday or Sun day. Monday, often is seen as a day of depression, anxiety, hysteria, or melancholy And the bastard name “Waters” maybe hinting at with the figurative description of the Other’s armor with its patterns of moonlight on water. Continued side note: The name “Corbray” seems like a bit of wordplay for bray Cor or breaker. Here it’s Waymar’s sword that breaks. In the prologue chapter, Martin objectifies or dehumanizes all his characters. They are chremamorphisms. I mean they are figuratively their swords. Awhile back I had this thought about the figurative Blackfyre blade when it touched Waymar’s black steel blade. The blades touched, the steel shattered. I think they both shatter. There was rain and needles…water and steel, like Ice and Fire. Waymar’s sword shivers into a hundred brittle pieces, and the shards scatter like a rain of needles when the two blades touch. One of the shards from Waymar’s sword ends up transfixed into the blind white pupil of his left eye. The phrase “like a rain of needles”, a simile, directly compares the scattering shards to a rain of needles. One of the shards, figuratively one of the needles from Waymar’s sword transfixed in Waymar’s eye, is a figurative needle in the eye. Ouch! There’s a saying that, at a time when a truth is being questioned, one might be asked to say. It’s to ensure he/she is telling the truth, “Cross your heart, hope to die, stick a needle in your eye?” Sticking a needle in the eye of a corpse was once a custom to make sure that someone wasn’t still alive before they were buried. I think it’s then reasonable to assume that because Ser Waymar Royce took a figurative needle in the eye to ensure that he was dead is because he lied or broke his vow or went back on his promise or word. From this I looked for a crossing of his heart moment. I started by thinking of the swords crossing. Crossing seems to be a motif Martin is using. For example, fingers can be crossed. In the Prologue, Gared, like a broken or missing sword, is missing a little finger of his left hand. The trees branches, like the swords dueling , seem to be crossing their fingers also, And Martin oddly mentions Waymar’s bloody fingers. Waymar’s fingers are soaked in red, blood, like fire while Will’s fingers are cold, numb and nerveless. Waymar also seems to have a cross to bear, such as the words of House Royce, “We remember”. And a skull and crossbones are a sigil of pirates or raiders. They are a symbol of poison and death. Raiders were what Waymar and company set out to find. Swords, words apparently have a close relationship. A Knight will swear an oath on a sword or give their word. Men of the Night’s Watch take their vows in front of a heart tree. Oathbreakers, like deserters, and rangers who fail in their duties, to call out, face death by the sword. And notice too how the literal terms have a close similarity….swords word, word sword. The Houses have swords and words. It’s said that the pen(a word crafting tool) is mightier than the sword. The point I’m making is swords crossing might make sense in the scene as a broken promise. And I also pointed to Waymar as a figurative “Prince that was promised”. He’s both a Sworn sword or Promised brother of the Night’s Watch and a Son(Sun) or Prince of the Bronze Yohn. There’s a real dichotomy to the scene. What sword is Waymar figuratively wielding. I believed it to be a “cross your heart” sword. In the quote at the beginning of this post Waymar’s “parry came a beat too late. The pale sword bit through the ringmail beneath his arm”, where his heart would be. Lady Forlorn is said to have a heart-shaped ruby in its’ pommel. It currently belongs to House Corbray whose coat-of-arms, similar to this prologue with three blackbirds, is three black ravens in flight, holding three red hearts, on a white field (Argent, three ravens volant sable, each clutching in their claws a heart gules). The three red hearts would parallel the sapphires in Waymar’s sword hilt nicely. Waymar’s hilt is believed by the fandom and myself to be the same hilt found by a member of the free folk and turned in at the Wall. This is the chapter that begins with Jon dreaming, Sapphires and rubies scientifically are the same corundum minerals. The only difference between sapphires and ruby in color. The seat of House Corbray is Heart’s Home where Sansa Stark using the name Alayne Stone stops while traveling with Lord Petyr Baelish and Lady Lysa Arryn from the Fingers to the Eyrie. Sansa with the bastard name Stone and a dead mother named Stone heart. Catelyn would definitely fit the description of a forlorn lady. She’s: desolate or dreary; unhappy or miserable, as in feeling, condition, or appearance., lonely and sad; forsaken, expressive of hopelessness; despairing, bereft; destitute Is this figuratively Blackfyre vs. Lady Forlorn in the Prologue. Between both swords landing their mark becoming covered in frost and blood and the shattering we get this, Throughout the whole Prologue we can identify many palindromes. A palindrome can be a word, sentence that’s read the same way backwards and forwards and in some cases, like mom, upside down and right side up. It’s a mirror word. The Other, who is mirroring Waymar (recall Waymar’s voice also cracking), is mimicking his words with his mocking. Except, it’s in the form of a palindrome. I think Martin sometimes enjoys entertaining himself with the constraints of palindromes. But this is why “Will did not know”. In Other words, while mocking Waymar after Waymar says, “For Robert” the Other says “treboR roF”. Trebor Jordayne is Lord of the Tor and head of House Jordayne in Dorne. The fandom has noted that Trebor Jordayne is a homage by George R. R. Martin to author Robert Jordan, who was one of Martin's friends. "Trebor" is "Robert" backwards, "Jordayne" is similar to "Jordan", and "Tor" is Jordan's publisher. Harriet McDougal Jordan’s spouse also was closely related to Tor. She, a forlorn lady, would personify the sword. Lady Forlorn or “For” “lorn” lorn - forsaken, desolate, bereft, or lost, ruined, or undone The “roF” in “treboR roF” may have several layers of meaning. “roF” I think is likely a acronym for Ring of Fire. This would make sense since Waymar’s blood welled between the rings. Waymar’s blood, like fire, would create rings of fire. This would bring together Waymar’s words (“For Robert”) and sword (Lady Forlorn) as a relationship between Robert Jordan and his spouse. There’s also a geological phenomenon called the “ring of fire” where many volcanic eruptions and earthquakes occur. But I haven’t given much thought to that yet. Last thought, If Daemon Blackfyre (moon day) + (Targaryen bastard) and Gwayne Corbray (breaker + ?). Than what is ?
  9. The new thought was the arrangement of the letters as a palindrome. Martin mirrors things in so many different ways. But yes, Satin, sin, assassin, Stannis, Sansa —-I can’t wrap my head around a single motif that makes sense. Nissa Nissa looks like an echo Sorry just loose thoughts
  10. I feel like this is an under developed thought but here it is… Here’s my newest discovery nissassassin(A palindrome) If you divided it perfectly in half you would have nissas sassin (notice they are mirror reflections of each other). You might say it’s a “Nissa” with an “s”. A “Nissa” with an “s” is “Nissas”is plural for “Nissa” or “Nissa Nissa” “nissassassin” Take away the “sin” off either side backwards and forwards and you get assassin backwards and forwards. There’s certainly more here somewhere
  11. In a previous post I mentioned Will’s dirk paralleling a direwolf pup with theses two passages. Here Will has climbed into a Sentinel tree and unsheathed his dirk to place into his mouth. He opens his mouth to call down a warning and the dirk must have fallen. The continuation of this hidden narrative comes in ASOS the first Samwell chapter 18. I mentioned before that we were seeing the birth of a direwolf pup. Now I believe we are seeing the delivery of “Ghost” the direwolf pup. And I don’t mean delivery in a traditional sense. In the last quote it was “snow” that fell. “Snow” as in bastard also.(There’s the wordplay:)) Ghost, like Jon, is a bastard. To my mind, the dirk in Will mouth is symbolic of Ghost in the mouth of the mother direwolf. Ghost was born before his litter mates, that’s why his eyes are already open. The other litter mates are symbolized by the “Fear that filled Will’s gut like a meal he could not digest.”
  12. In the prologue of a Game of Thrones, Will is telling Waymar the details about what he saw from, what I assume is, the ridge of the wildling raiders’ camp. Smiling thinly(is this a sinister smile?), Will explains that there’s a woman, a far-eyes, up an ironwood half-hid in the branches. He could see that she wasn’t moving. Where did she go? I mean later, in his return to the empty camp, Will hears a wolf howl somewhere off in the wood and he pulls his garron over beneath an ancient gnarled ironwood and dismounts. Was the wolf howl a signal? Certainly it wasn’t random. It’s too coincidental. And if this is the same ironwood where Will saw the far-eyes half-hid, seems likely, shouldn’t he have had more cautious when approaching? And so wouldn’t it have been more prudent to dismount sooner? He never mentions or seems concerned about her. Why? Waymar, likely suspicious, draws his sword and dismounts asking why they were stopping. Will, apparently feeling safe enough, doesn’t draw his weapon and suggests that Waymar put his away. It “will tangle you up”, he says. Will obviously doesn’t feel like there’re in imminent danger. Next Waymar, his face reflective, pauses a moment staring off into the distance. Is he suspiciously searching the upper limbs of the tree? Is he recalling the smaller details of Will’s observations, remembering the type of tree where Will saw the far-eyes? The wind blowing, Gared interrupts Waymar’s thinking. What was he thinking? We can only guess. Maybe he’s not sure if this is the right ironwood and so he says nothing. But when Gared mutters, “There’s something wrong”, Waymar seems convinced that Gared and Will are conspiring against him. Waymar’s disdainful smile and his response, “Is there?” seems to be dripping with sarcasm. As a reader, being privy to the thoughts of our POV(Will), it should be noted that Will never thinks about the far-eyes during the return to the empty camp. Why? Did Waymar, after not seeing the far-eyes, anticipate that there’d be no one in the camp? Perhaps he did. Upon seeing the camp, Waymar laughs at Will seeing that his dead men have seemingly moved. Certainly there’s much more going on here than we are seeing. Digging deeper… Consider this…giving it some thought, it dawned on me that “far-eyes” sounds a lot like fairies. And, if indeed, Will saw a tree-fairy or minor nature deity than this would continue the allegory that I discovered in chapter 1 (Bran 1). The allegory introduces the myth of Uranus. In the myth, Uranus is castrated by his son Cronos and his testicles are cast into the sea. The blood from that castration rained down onto the earth(Gaia) and produced the Erinyes (Furies), the Giants, and the Meliae. The Meliae were usually considered to be the nymphs of the ash tree, whose name they shared. The Greek word for ash tree is meliai. According to Greco-Roman mythology Zeus created the men of the Bronze Age from the ash tree perhaps specifically of the manna ash. Interestingly, the Meliae were the nurses of the infant Zeus? Is this what House Royce and Bronze Yohn remembers? Does Yohn remember his ancestors? The manna ash is a deciduous tree. The term deciduous means "falling off at maturity" and "tending to fall off", in reference to trees that seasonally shed leaves, usually in the autumn. The bark is dark grey, remaining smooth even on old trees. So we would just need to find a dark grey deciduous pregnant tree with the spirit of a woman to play the part of the manna ash to continue the allegory. How bout the ancient gnarled ironwood with a woman in it? Iron is dark grey. And a gnarl could certainly give us the impression of a pregnant tree. A gnarl: can be defined as “a knotty protuberance on a tree”. Yet still we have no idea what’s going on in the ironwood scene. Help?
  13. Some wordplay Born / borne/ bear/ bare Borne is, just like born, the past participle of the verb bear, which can mean (among other things) "to contain" or "to give birth to." At first, borne and born were variant spellings of the same adjective. Used as in water-borne (or water-born), it means "carried by." In the Prologue of AGOT Martin develops the idea about the birth of the direwolf pups using some figurative language. Will’s dirk is symbolic of a pup as it falls out of his mouth( a symbolic birth) from the sentinel tree, an old God. Here Will puts his dirk in his mouth, “He whispered a prayer to the nameless gods of the wood, and slipped his dirk free of its sheath. He put it between his teeth to keep both hands free for climbing. The taste of cold iron in his mouth gave him comfort.” Life begins with a fall. Here it falls out, “Will opened his mouth to call down a warning, and the words seemed to freeze in his throat.” Then the next time we read about the Others we get this: ”The lower branches of the great green sentinel shed their burden of snow with a soft wet plop.” (A Samwell 1 chapter in ASOS) This quote shows, figuratively, the birth of a pup. Now compare those “lower branches” to these lower branches from AGOT, Prologue. ”The great sentinel was right there at the top of the ridge, where Will had known it would be, its lowest branches a bare foot off the ground.” So bear/ bare/ borne/ born… I believe a foot and lower branches are lower limbs and roots (family roots)
  14. Waymar shadow fighting Is Will looking into the window of an alternate reality? Is it mirroring our own? The description of Waymar and the emerging shadow can be seen as mirror opposites. The next part of the short essay will give a play-by-play or blow-by-blow description of the duel between Waymar and the Other. I’ll try to explain how Martin cleverly arranges and conceals the fact that Waymar is fighting his shadow. Each blow will be recounted and shown to perfectly mimic the other. Gracefully, “A shadow emerges from the dark of the wood. It stood in front of Royce.” Waymar, graceful, also emerged from the woods. And stood in front of a shadow. The shadow, “It moved” seemly making the colors on it armor shift. Will notices a sword in its one hand. Waymar, holding his sword in one hand, threw the long sable cloak back over his shoulders revealing his black armor gleaming in the moonlight. Waymar takes “his sword in both hands”, requests a “dance” and “lifts his sword high over his head”. “His hands tremble from the weight of it” like one trying to stabilize or be still. “The Other halted.” Its pale longsword was “shivering”. (Interestingly the shadow is now called an Other. Is it the “other” Waymar?) “When the blades met, there was no ring of metal on metal; only a high, thin sound at the edge of hearing.” The text does not explicitly tell us what position the Others blade starts from or if it’s using two hands. We can only try to infer that. Did they met “high”? I think Martin is purposely ambiguous here. Does the high sound also sound high? Is the longsword shivering because it’s only using one hand? I believe it makes sense that the Other is using two hands and also has his sword high overhead. It also would make it easier for the detailed inspection that Will gives us:) “Royce checked a second blow, and a third, then fell back a step. Another flurry of blows, and he fell back again.” Checking is a defensive coming together of the blades. I believe they likely checked each other both falling back each time. The “flurry of blows” describes an aggressive coming together the blades. Shadow boxing? I mean shadow sword dueling. At this point we’ve yet to read about a definitively unique move. “Again and again the swords met”. The swords danced and Waymar was tiring. Then Royce’s parry came a beat too late. I think evidence suggests that they both were unable to to ward off or avert a blow. They both found their mark. Waymar’s sword come away “white with frost”. The Other’s “pale sword bit through the ringmail beneath Waymar’s arm”. The Other’s blade came away seemingly “red with blood”. Waymar then cried out in pain. The Other mocks, mimics and imitates Waymar. Sounding like “the cracking of ice on a winter lake”. I wonder if Will, with his ears covered, could distinguish what sound was who. Waymar, wounded and tired, swings his sword around with both hands in a flat sidearm defensive slash with all his weight behind it. The Other’s parry was also almost lazy. The Other must have also found some fury. Next, the blades touched, the steel shattered. Did they both shatter? Did they shatter because of the royal blood? A promised prince? (Waymar’s was the third son of the Bronze King, knighted and newly sworn(promised) NW Brother) “A scream echoed through the forest night, and the longsword shivered into a hundred brittle pieces, the shards scattering like a rain of needles. Royce went to his knees, shrieking, and covered his eyes. Blood welled between his fingers.” And we get no more about this Other or its sword? “a rain of needles”, could be interpreted as a melted ice sword and a broken steel shards of a sword. Does the “rain of needle” parallel the laughter sharp icicles of the watchers in the next paragraph? “The watchers moved forward together, as if some signal had been given.” Is that signal a merging of Waymar and his alternate reality self? Can we begin to understand the Others as reflections? Reflections in the door of a watery mirror to another reality? Mirroring is a major literary device here in the prologue. Like Yin and Yang, two parts of a whole, two identical opposites. Remember I wrote a good piece about the ironwood tree and sentinel tree of the prologue that gives more details about this idea.
  15. Waymar’s and the Other’s swords According to Craster, in ACOK a Jon chapter 23, Waymar’s Sword was black steel. And it was became “white with frost” during Waymar’s dance with the Other’s sword, AGOT Prologue. The Other’s sword was a pale translucent shard of crystal that was alive with moonlight and it shimmered and danced with a faint blue ghost-light. AGOT, Prologue And the Other’s sword would have been covered in Waymar’s blood. Note that the droplets only “seemed red as fire”. That’s because of the Purkinje effect. The effect describes why reds will appear darker relative to other colors as light levels decrease, i.e. moonlight. For this reason Waymar’s blood would appear black on the blade of the Other’s sword. So we have two swords, One black sword (Waymar’s sword) with the blade half white. One white sword (Other’s sword) with the blade half black. Picture those two swords meeting. Perfect contract! Interesting??
  16. During my analysis of the trees specifically mentioned in the Prologue of A Game of Thrones it occurred to me that if a tree can be leafy… can an ironwood tree be irony? I checked and indeed irony can be used as an adjective to describe something with iron in it. To me this was interesting. Because while analyzing Martin’s writing I’ve noticed a pattern. He likes to subverts the literal meaning of the text by using an alternate meaning of the same word to develop his figurative ideas. For example, the ironwood tree can be considered irony because it, in fact, does have iron in it. A more common use of the word, irony, among authors is as a literary technique. In literature, irony conveys a meaning which is opposite of its literal meaning, a sort of inverse reflection. The ideas and skills on display here with this writing is wonderful. It becomes more glorious when the idea is set to juxtapose the sentinel tree! I’ll try to explain. I believe that figuratively the trees are set up in a way to be mirror reflections of each other. I say figuratively because in the narrative the trees seem to have very little in common. So this comparison only makes sense in a figurative way. I have long theorized that the sentinel tree in the Prologue of AGOT was part of a larger allegory and is symbolic of a Myrrh tree. A myrrh tree takes its’ name from the mother of Adonis, Myrrha. Adonis will be discussed later. The idea of a Myrrh tree and an irony tree in juxtaposition becomes self evident of a more grand theory, a magical door! A door into another reality. Imagine two mirrors facing one another. This will give the impression of an infinite series of the same image being reflected over and over again. The word-play here seems so clever and goes on to typify Martin’s sense of humor and style. Using an irony tree and a tree, who’s name is a homophone for mirror, as inversely reflective just seems so ingenious and delightfully artful to me. Then he reinforces the sci-fi genre when we understand the science behind his fiction. Science says, “if you observe the reflections from two opposing mirrors, you will realize that the image will become greener with each reflection. This is because mirrors usually reflect light from the green spectrum more than other colors. So when a mirror is reflecting color, that color contains reflections from the green spectrum more than other color spectrums. As such, as other colors fade away gradually, the only visible color remaining will be green. This topic could easily continue on into greensight and green seers but that’s not what I want to discuss. I want to discuss the birth of the direwolf pups. I just wanted to plant the seed of a figurative cosmic world tree. Sticking with the Prologue of the first book, Martin has covertly hidden the fact that lightning strikes the ironwood tree and leaves Gared shell shocked and Waymar’s destrier electrocuted. Taking a moment with the scene of Waymar’s duel. Pay attention to way Martin describes the action of the swords. Several blows and a flurry of other blows pushes Waymar’s back, like the winds of a storm perhaps. He uses words like rain and lighting. He tells us that when the swords meet that we get a rain of needles, as if struck by lightning. Then as a result of the swords meeting we get a loud echoing in the dark. It’s certainly no coincidence that the third book of the series is titled, “A Storm of Swords”. This is the second part of an essay trying to show the birth of a direwolf pup. Here I begin to establishing the relationship between the dueling swords and the two trees specifically mentioned in the Prologue. Earlier in the chapter when the blowing starts “the trees rustle like living things”. But first let’s present the quotes that support the claims I’ve made so far, “When the blades touched,…” we get a loud jarring, “echoing”, piercing sound made by two metal objects being struck together that Martin describes as a “scream”, like a clash of cymbals, I mean symbols. Then we get “a rain of needles” from one blade. And the Other blade is said to have, “danced with pale blue light.”, like lightning perhaps. The same “lightning” that “struck” and left “the end” of Waymar’s sword “splintered and twisted”. The Other’s word and sword (notice the word-play) is a perfect comparison for the voice that “was like the cracking of ice on a winter lake” and how Ser Waymar Royce’s voice cracked when the breath went out of him when he said, “come no further”. His voice cracked like a boy’s. Later, I’ll explain how the swords crack when we compare the swords and the ones holding them. A comparison like that is called a chremamorphism and compares a person to an object. This means they can share certain symbolic traits. -wind (Several blows and a flurry of other blows pushes Waymar’s back) -Thunder (loud, echoing, piercing sound) -rain (of needles) -lightning (pale blue light dancing) -the sound of cracking (the voices of both Waymar and the Other crack) The most obvious indication of the storm comes literally following “the end” when we read, “…the end splintered and twisted like a tree struck by lightning.” (Prologue, AGOT)
  17. This is the first part of a lengthy Analysis of the text that will show the birth of Ghost. During my analysis of the trees specifically mentioned in the Prologue of A Game of Thrones it occurred to me that if a tree can be leafy… can an ironwood tree be irony? I checked and indeed irony can be used as an adjective to describe something. Another thing that I’ve noticed about Martin’s writing pattern is the way he subverts the literal meaning of the text by using an alternate meaning of the same word to develop a figurative idea. Understanding that, a more common use of the word, irony, among authors is as a literary technique. In literature, irony conveys a meaning which is opposite of its literal meaning, an inverse reflection. This thought was glorious! Glorious because that idea combined with my analysis of the sentinel tree made for a perfect match. Or better to say a mirror match. I had long theorized that the sentinel tree in the Prologue of AGOT was part of a larger allegory and is symbolic of a Myrrh tree. A myrrh tree takes its’ name from the mother of Adonis, Myrrha. The idea of a Myrrh tree and an irony tree combine to become self evident of a more grand theory, a magical door! Imagine two mirrors facing one another. This will give the impression of an infinite series of the same image being reflected over and over again. The word-play here seems so clever and goes on to typify Martin’s sense of humor and style. Using an irony tree and a tree, who’s name is a homophone for mirror, as inversely reflective just seems so ingenious and delightfully artful to me. Then he reinforces the sci-fi genre when we understand the science in his fiction. Science says, “if you observe the reflections from two opposing mirrors, you will realize that the image will become greener with each reflection. This is because mirrors usually reflect light from the green spectrum more than other colors. So when a mirror is reflecting color, that color contains reflections from the green spectrum more than other color spectrums. As such, as other colors fade away gradually, the only visible color remaining will be green. This topic could easily continue on into greensight and green seers but that’s not what I want to discuss. I want to discuss the birth of the direwolf pups. I just wanted to plant the seed of a figurative cosmic world tree. To be continued…
  18. Here’s some imagery that might match up with that idea. Picture Waymar’s body “face down” with “one arm out-flung” in the snow. (Black on white) in the middle of 12 “watchers”. The text even references Waymar’s face by saying “face down”. Think clock-face or watch-face. The math here is 3 + 4 + 5 = 12. I think, like he seems to love doing, that Martin is being ambiguous to allow for multiple meanings. In the text, we read “The thick sable cloak had been slashed in a dozen places.” One stabby whabby apiece. His face even had runes on it. Earlier, Will responds to Waymar’s question about how many watches he has drawn? To which Will says, “There never was a week when he did not draw a dozen bloody watches.” ( It’s odd because Will has been “ranging” the past week). This seems to foreshadow Waymar’s situation. In Waymar’s bloody situation there are a dozen watchers that draw and in Will’s response to Waymar he drew a dozen bloody watches. Lastly, during the duel Waymar “came up snarling”. Certainly, this probably makes reference symbolically or figuratively to the mother direwolf. However, again Martin likes ambiguity. Iron snarling is a metallurgy technique of embedding, here clock symbols, into metal. Metallurgy is a theme early on in the Game of Thrones. Perhaps we should ask Waymar what time it is. I’m not sure about Hightower. It’s probably a thing. Waymar did tower above Will and Gared.
  19. This idea also matches up with the pale shapes they surround Waymar while using their “pale blades” they slice through Waymar’s ringmail “as if it were silk.” Even their voices that Will heard were like “laughter sharp as icicles.” “It was cold butchery.” Harp and sickles seem to be some words at play here. I believe when you see Jon go beyond the pale it’s an action that parallels the birth of Ghost in the Prologue. Like Jon, Ghost is a bastard. Ghost was carried in the mouth of the mother direwolf I think while the other pups are of the womb.
  20. Word play Li’ pup I think I have a good thought. When two reflective things face one another (picture two large mirrors) the idea of infinity comes to mind. Like a mirror, an eye is also reflective. I believe we are seeing a mirror and an eye come together with some nice little word-play at the of Waymar’s duel. Eyes in AGOT, Prologue are described like gems. And gems often symbolize stars. In the Prologue of AGOT, Ser Waymar Royce’s Long Sword that shattered had jewels (plural) that glittered in its hilt. Later, in ADWD Jon XII, a member of the free folk seems to have found a broken sword hilt. Long ago, someone noticed this and understandably assumed it once belonged to Ser Waymar Royce. The broken sword hilt had three sapphires. A long swords, so-called for its long hilt, is traditionally fashioned in the shape of a crucifix. (symbolic of death and rebirth) This allows the user to use one or both hands on the sword in battle. The arrangement of three sapphires on the hilt, most likely, is evenly spaced on the cross guard. Google “Narsil” the broken sword from LOTR and look at the images. A sword like that “trembling on high” against a clear night winter sky is a clever way for Martin to draw our attention to Orion’s Belt in my opinion. I mean Martin is literally shaking the sword against the sky. (In our narrative it’s called “The Sword of the Morning constellation”) Those stars are best viewed in the early night sky during the Northern Winter. This black sword (A constellation) would be located just above the ice wall (an ice sword) another symbolic sword. “As above, so below”, says the old maxim. The three, easily identifiable, evenly-spaced stars of Orion’s Belt (The sword of the Morning) match up precisely with the number of blue eyes in the chapter. Martin even states this about the Other’s eyes, “They fixed on the longsword trembling on high,…”, key word “fixed”, as in mounted. The three sapphires are literally paralleling Orion’s Belt. This is precisely what caught the Other eyes. They “fixed” on the hilt that matched near perfectly with the star directly behind it. The same blue eyes with a description that sounds like stars, “…its eyes; blue, deeper and bluer than any human eyes, a blue that burned like ice.” and “The pupil burned blue.” Note: en tremblant is also a gem setting Note: Also, Diamonds are a gem nicknamed “ice”. A little known fact, Orion’s sword was once identified as the Mirror of Venus or Venus’ mirror. Thus, waymar‘s sword paralleling Orion’s sword (The Sword of the Morning) could be seen as shattering like a mirror symbolically. In the main narrative Waymar’s Sword I believe is made of martensite, a form of carbon steel especially hard and brittle produced by undercooling during the forging process. (Side note: It’s interesting that Waymar’s cloak, made of little furry Martens, comes together and his sword, made of martensite, shatters.) The cloak symbolizes many deaths with, and the sword symbolizes birth. The birth being the word-play I wanted to share. “Pupil”(eye) where the reflective shard or the shining steel ends up is also reflective at the moment just before impact. Like when two reflective things face one another (picture two large mirrors) the idea of infinity again comes to mind. Using your minds eye hold the book to a mirror. Read the leaf until you see the word “pupil”. In your minds eye you’ll see “liquq”. Truth, one would have to mind their ”p’s” and “q’s”, an old idiom, to get it right. Typesetters often confused the two similar-looking letters. In this case, if the typesetters get it wrong we end up with lipup or li’pup. Short for little puppy. Look at this quote again, Now we have an injured eye(symbolic gem) that is trans”fixed” with the sword shard. Not eyes fixed on a trembling sword. “Trans” is a prefix meaning across, beyond or through. “Trans” can also suggest gender neutrality. Li’ pup - “…blind white…” Ghost!? I think so. “Left” also symbolically lines up with our little bastard according to Gared’s little finger. The two ears and three toes line up with the Other pups. “Three male, two female.” “His fine clothes were a tatter, his face a ruin.”, Also presents a lot of symbolism but I don’t think I need to cover that here. In summary, we have a shining steel reflective shard entering into Waymar’s eye(also reflective) creating this sense of infinity. We get a blind white Ghost … Sorry for the long explanation. The word-play on pupil would be otherwise easy to disregard.
  21. Word play Li’ pup I think I have a good thought. When two reflective things face one another (picture two large mirrors) the idea of infinity comes to mind. Like a mirror, an eye is also reflective. I believe we are seeing a mirror and an eye come together with some nice little word-play at the of Waymar’s duel. Eyes in AGOT, Prologue are described like gems. And gems often symbolize stars. In the Prologue of AGOT, Ser Waymar Royce’s Long Sword that shattered had jewels (plural) that glittered in its hilt. Later, in ADWD Jon XII, a member of the free folk seems to have found a broken sword hilt. Long ago, someone noticed this and understandably assumed it once belonged to Ser Waymar Royce. The broken sword hilt had three sapphires. A long swords, so-called for its long hilt, is traditionally fashioned in the shape of a crucifix. (symbolic of death and rebirth) This allows the user to use one or both hands on the sword in battle. The arrangement of three sapphires on the hilt, most likely, is evenly spaced on the cross guard. Google “Narsil” the broken sword from LOTR and look at the images. A sword like that “trembling on high” against a clear night winter sky is a clever way for Martin to draw our attention to Orion’s Belt in my opinion. I mean Martin is literally shaking the sword against the sky. (In our narrative it’s called “The Sword of the Morning constellation”) Those stars are best viewed in the early night sky during the Northern Winter. This black sword (A constellation) would be located just above the ice wall (an ice sword) another symbolic sword. “As above, so below”, says the old maxim. The three, easily identifiable, evenly-spaced stars of Orion’s Belt (The sword of the Morning) match up precisely with the number of blue eyes in the chapter. Martin even states this about the Other’s eyes, “They fixed on the longsword trembling on high,…”, key word “fixed”, as in mounted. The three sapphires are literally paralleling Orion’s Belt. This is precisely what caught the Other eyes. They “fixed” on the hilt that matched near perfectly with the star directly behind it. The same blue eyes with a description that sounds like stars, “…its eyes; blue, deeper and bluer than any human eyes, a blue that burned like ice.” and “The pupil burned blue.” Note: en tremblant is also a gem setting Note: Also, Diamonds are a gem nicknamed “ice”. A little known fact, Orion’s sword was once identified as the Mirror of Venus or Venus’ mirror. Thus, waymar‘s sword paralleling Orion’s sword (The Sword of the Morning) could be seen as shattering like a mirror symbolically. In the main narrative Waymar’s Sword I believe is made of martensite, a form of carbon steel especially hard and brittle produced by undercooling during the forging process. (Side note: It’s interesting that Waymar’s cloak, made of little furry Martens, comes together and his sword, made of martensite, shatters.) The cloak symbolizes many deaths with, and the sword symbolizes birth. The birth being the word-play I wanted to share. “Pupil”(eye) where the reflective shard or the shining steel ends up is also reflective at the moment just before impact. Like when two reflective things face one another (picture two large mirrors) the idea of infinity again comes to mind. Using your minds eye hold the book to a mirror. Read the leaf until you see the word “pupil”. In your minds eye you’ll see “liquq”. Truth, one would have to mind their ”p’s” and “q’s”, an old idiom, to get it right. Typesetters often confused the two similar-looking letters. In this case, if the typesetters get it wrong we end up with lipup or li’pup. Short for little puppy. Look at this quote again, Now we have an injured eye(symbolic gem) that is trans”fixed” with the sword shard. Not eyes fixed on a trembling sword. “Trans” is a prefix meaning across, beyond or through. “Trans” can also suggest gender neutrality. Li’ pup - “…blind white…” Ghost!? I think so. “Left” also symbolically lines up with our little bastard according to Gared’s little finger. The two ears and three toes line up with the Other pups. “Three male, two female.” “His fine clothes were a tatter, his face a ruin.”, Also presents a lot of symbolism but I don’t think I need to cover that here. In summary, we have a shining steel reflective shard entering into Waymar’s eye(also reflective) creating this sense of infinity. We get a blind white Ghost … Sorry for the long explanation. The word-play on pupil would be otherwise easy to disregard.
  22. In the Prologue of AGOT, Ser Waymar Royce’s Long Sword that shattered had jewels (more than one) that glittered in its hilt. Later, in ADWD Jon XII, a member of the free folk seems to have found a broken sword hilt. Long ago, someone noticed this and understandably assumed it once belonged to Ser Waymar Royce. The broken sword hilt had three sapphires. A long swords, so-called for its long hilt, is traditionally fashioned in the shape of a crucifix. This allows the user to use one or both hands on the sword in battle. The arrangement of three sapphires on the hilt, most likely, is evenly spaced on the cross guard. Google “Narsil” the broken sword from LOTR and look at the images. A sword like that “trembling on high” against a clear night winter sky is a clever way for Martin to draw our attention to Orion’s Belt in my opinion. “As above, so below”, says the old maxim. The three, easily identifiable, evenly spaced stars of Orion’s Belt match up precisely with the number of blue eyes in the chapter. The same blue eyes with a description that sounds like stars, “…its eyes; blue, deeper and bluer than any human eyes, a blue that burned like ice.” and “The pupil burned blue.” Other notes - Rubies and sapphires both come from the same mineral, corundum, and are nearly identical. - Ice, is a nickname for diamonds. - Ghost, has eyes the color of Gared’s blood.
  23. I don’t know. Besides the obvious similarities in sound what other connections are you seeing ?
  24. Morning Star. Those are some very insightful thoughts. I simply can’t digest the stuff that fast. Cloth/Oath. My initial thoughts are of threading, needles, Eye of the needle. To rag(verb) someone using words to inflict harm. And derag (Gared backwards) can be “de” meaning "out of" or "away from." A rag is a small cloth torn out of a larger cloth. Torn/sworn seem to be antonyms here. To be a sworn brother of the Night‘s Watch would be to become ‘part of’. Torn, as in cloth, is a rag. By definition rag and tatter line up well with Waymar’s cloths. The definition of tatter- A person who does tatting, or make (knotted lace) by tatting. Skin changing? I am rambling :-) I’ll try to organize my thoughts better in another post.
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