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Mysecondaccount

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  1. I was recently doing some reading about the Native American conflicts on the Mexican American border, the inspiration behind Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. During the early 19th century, the Apaches and Comanches mercilessly raided much of northern and central Mexico. They were mostly unimpeded, as the Comanches and Apaches outmatched the skeletal Mexican army. In their attacks, they killed thousands of peasants, abducted and enslaved/assimilated hundreds more, left thousands of survivors homeless, and stolen ten thousands of livestock. The Apaches and Comanches were even bold enough to assault capital cities like Chihuahua in broad daylight. It got to the point that the Comanche-Apache raids left much of the border regions depopulated. As the Mexican army was in shambles, the government turned to bounty hunters/mercenaries to contest the depredations. The bounty hunters/mercenaries were a motley bunch, mostly consisted of Anglo-Americans, displaced Woodland Native Americans from the East Coast, local tribes hostile to the Apaches, and a few escaped slaves. Essentially, the Mexican government commissioned them to kill and scalp any Apaches they could get their hands on. Including women and children, whom had bounties of $50 and $25 US silver dollar per scalp respectively. As you might expect, the Apaches didn't respond well to this attempt genocide. They escalated their raids to the point of wiping out entire small towns and table turned would be scalp hunters left and right. Many scalp hunters decided that it was safer to prey upon peaceful Native American bands and Mexican peasants (ironically the very people they were hired to protect in the first place) and pass them off as Apache scalps, rather then going after the Apaches themselves. With the crippling costs and incessant cheating/backstabbing, the Mexican government abandoned the scalp hunting program. Though due to decentralization and lack of communication, some states were slower to drop the scalp hunters then others. Comanche and Apache raids still continued on until the 1870s (for the Comaches) and 1890s (for the Apaches). The Comanche raids into Mexico were only ended by the Americans forcing them into reservations. In the later 19th century, the Apaches virtually fought a two-front war against the Americans in the North and the Mexicans to the South, until pressure from both countries overwhelmed them. Sources: 1.https://allthatsinteresting.com/john-joel-glanton 2.https://www.frontiertimesmagazine.com/blog/an-indian-raid-in-mexico 3.https://crossculturalsolidarity.com/the-comanche-empire-and-the-destruction-of-northern-mexico/ 4.https://xroads.virginia.edu/~Hyper/HNS/Scalpin/oldfolks.html
  2. Would it be alright if I could what particular aspect(s) of his works that've influenced your views on them?
  3. I was recently doing some reading about the Native American conflicts on the Mexican American border, the inspiration behind Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. During the early 19th century, the Apaches and Comanches mercilessly raided much of northern and central Mexico. They were mostly unimpeded, as the Comanches and Apaches outmatched the skeletal Mexican army. In their attacks, they killed thousands of peasants, abducted and enslaved/assimilated hundreds more, left thousands of survivors homeless, and stolen ten thousands of livestock. The Apaches and Comanches were even bold enough to assault capital cities like Chihuahua in broad daylight. It got to the point that the Comanche-Apache raids left much of the border regions depopulated. As the Mexican army was in shambles, the government turned to bounty hunters/mercenaries to contest the depredations. The bounty hunters/mercenaries were a motley bunch, mostly consisted of Anglo-Americans, displaced Woodland Native Americans from the East Coast, local tribes hostile to the Apaches, and a few escaped slaves. Essentially, the Mexican government commissioned them to kill and scalp any Apaches they could get their hands on. Including women and children, whom had bounties of $50 and $25 US silver dollar per scalp respectively. As you might expect, the Apaches didn't respond well to this attempt genocide. They escalated their raids to the point of wiping out entire small towns and table turned would be scalp hunters left and right. Many scalp hunters decided that it was safer to prey upon peaceful Native American bands and Mexican peasants (ironically the very people they were hired to protect in the first place) and pass them off as Apache scalps, rather then going after the Apaches themselves. With the crippling costs and incessant cheating/backstabbing, the Mexican government abandoned the scalp hunting program. Though due to decentralization and lack of communication, some states were slower to drop the scalp hunters then others. Comanche and Apache raids still continued on until the 1870s (for the Comaches) and 1890s (for the Apaches). The Comanche raids into Mexico were only ended by the Americans forcing them into reservations. In the later 19th century, the Apaches virtually fought a two-front war against the Americans in the North and the Mexicans to the South, until pressure from both countries overwhelmed them. Sources: 1.https://allthatsinteresting.com/john-joel-glanton 2.https://www.frontiertimesmagazine.com/blog/an-indian-raid-in-mexico 3.https://crossculturalsolidarity.com/the-comanche-empire-and-the-destruction-of-northern-mexico/ 4.https://xroads.virginia.edu/~Hyper/HNS/Scalpin/oldfolks.html
  4. From my limited understanding (I could easily be wrong on this, as I'm not an expert) goes, it's not a matter of "eating healthier makes healthier bodies" in this case. It is more that "past peoples'" bodies are more adapted for/and resilient to such foods, then we are now. As they had a lifetime of exposure from eating them. However, I might've worded it poorly in my orignal post.
  5. From what I read, merely eating would be a considerable hazard for a hypothetical time traveler traveling beyond a few centuries in the past. Apparently, strict regulations in the processing of food (dating to the early 20th century after the release of Upton Sinclair's the Jungle) has considerably weakened a modern person's immunity system. In other words, most diets beyond the past hundred years would very dangerous to someone living today. As they were often cooked/prepared in conditions that would be now considered "unsanitary." For example, if a time traveler traveled back to medieval Europe or pre-Colombian Americas, the food there would at best make them considerably ill.
  6. If I could write a story in the ASOIAF universe, this is an outline of how it would go: For whatever reason, the Iron Throne decided on somehow establishing a trading outpost on an island chain near Sorthoyros. Perhaps they want to establish a foothold on the Summer Seas trading routes. Anyways, they didn't take the islands' inhabitants in consideration in their plans. For some context, there are two broad groups in the islands' demographics. One is a nation of settlers (known as the "Basilisk Islander settlers") with roots dating to the Free Cities. Their ancestors arrived as refugees uprooted by some sort of upheaval in their homeland (probably some unusually destructive war between the aforementioned Free Cities) centuries ago, and a handful of renegades needing a hide out sprinkled in. Coexisting with them is a diverse range of indigenous tribes (known as the "Basilisk Islander natives"), who have been living on the island for so long, that not even history can remember their origins. The relationship between the indigenous tribes and the settlers varies wildly, depending on the circumstances, but it generally tends to be cautiously and tenuously friendly. Though outbursts of violence between the settlers and the tribes do happen from time to time. Both the settlers and the natives are highly distrusting towards the new arrivals, deeming them as "interlopers." In return, the haughty Westorsi nobles regarded the settlers and natives as "scummy lowlifes" and "savage barbarians" respectively. At first the inhabitants were hoping that the Westeorsi would only stick to their outposts, and generally leave them alone. Much to their outrage, the Iron Throne declared their lands to property of the Seven Kingdoms, and demanded the natives and settlers their allegiance. When the natives and settlers refused to recognize the Iron Throne, the Westorsi sent an army to subjugate them. Further rattling the cages, the Iron Throne also started migrating swathes of noble houses and their retinue to administer the islands. Bringing with them thousands of newcomers that competed with the local tribes and "old" settlers for land. Making matters worse, corrupt and abusive Westorsi (both nobles and smallfolk) alike preyed upon their woman and extorted them for their valuables. Pushed beyond the boiling point, a confederation of natives and the "old" settlers formed an alliance against the Westeorsi. Together, they started raiding the Westerosi colonies. In their first attack, they killed dozens of Westorsi, abducted hundreds more for the slave trade, and burned a settlement to the ground. The Westeorsi tried pursuing the raiders into the jungles, with little success. More and more similar attacks followed suit. In retaliation for the raids, the Iron Throne massacred scores of natives and "old" settlers alike. Instead of the intended "intimidation" effect, it only further angered the "old" settlers and the indigenous tribes. The raids intensified in their brutality and frequency, leaving swathes of Westerosi colonies depopulated. In a desperate attempt to put a final end to the attacks, the Westeorsi gathered up their forces, and launched an expedition into the islands' heartland to stamp them out in their bases. Rushed preparation and inept planning left the Westorsi exposed to the jungles' dangers. Around half the Westeorsi perished from diseases, climate and geographical accidents, exhaustion, and animal attacks before even facing their enemy. They were also double crossed and abandoned by their guides, leaving the Westerosi army to wander aimlessly in the jungles. Native warriors and "old" settler militiamen utilized guerilla warfare and their familiarity with the terrain to great effect, launching lighting fast raids on the Westerosi columns. The dense jungle foliage provided excellent camouflage for the "old" settlers and their native allies. Enabling them to repeatedly "hit and run" attack the invaders, and then retreat back into cover unseen. Every night, the natives and "old" settlers infiltrated into their camps to snatch a few unwary camp-followers and men at arms. As they grew bolder by their unimpeded raids, infiltrators took to seizing nobles as well. Within a few weeks of hemorrhaging losses after losses from guerilla attacks and natural hazards, the Westeorsi army are depleted down to a few dozen fighting men. All of their civilian followers and retinue are either dead or abducted by native-"old" settler insurgents. They're all finished off in one devastating swoop of an ambush. After destroying the remnants of the expedition, the guerrillas turn their attention towards the colonies. As the Westeorsi lost most of their entire stationed military force in the ill-fated expedition, the colonies were easily overrun. The fates of the captives depended on both their gender and status. Nobles, regardless of gender, were spared to be bargaining chips. Male commoners were sacrificed by native priests to their gods, while female commoners were sold into the slave trade by the "old" settlers. In exchange for their freedom, the nobles agreed to a humiliating exile. According to the terms of the "agreement", they must never establish a presence in the islands ever again. The POV of this story would be a smallfolk Westeorsi family caught in the crossfire. They don't have any attachment to the conflict, and were only dragged along to the island by their liege lords. Their motivation is simply to provide for their own family. Essentially, the POV family are what TV Tropes calls "pinball protagonists", or in other words protagonists being trapped in circumstances beyond their control. When the uprising breaks out, they must get their loved ones to safety amidst the chaos. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done, as they're being ruthlessly hunted down by tribal warriors and settler insurgents alike. Making the situation even more precarious, the treacherous terrain is as deadly as any weapon. If you could write a story set in the ASOIAF world, what would it be about?
  7. In my experience, as with anything in this divisive and divided world, those threads can get extremely politicized very easily and quickly. For example, I've once stumbled across a post where the OP proclaimed to be man who was abused by a woman. The thread soon devolved into a gender politics battleground between MRA types who wanted to weaponize their alleged experience and hard-line feminists desperate to tear the story down.
  8. Yeah, one advantage with this over something like Reddit, is that you actually have an established connection those people. Too often, users on those anonymous subs and forums are dealing what is to them a faceless screen, and often forget that there's a person behind them. Although it obviously isn't always that way, I've come across quite a bit of vitriol spewed about in those threads.
  9. Alright, edited the last line of the post. Sorry for being a bit too aggressive and condescending with it.
  10. That is me simply having a negative opinion of those types of commenters, nothing more and nothing less. If people want take advise from those users, then I wish them luck. Sorry for coming across as pushing my personal opinions on them.
  11. Dude, please dial it back a bit. I never said they shouldn't be used at all (that is you grossly misquoting what is me trying to ask the equivalent of "do you think [x random film] a good movie, or is it one I should pass"), though I personally don't really care for them.
  12. You know the subreddits and forums, where users go for advice on any type of relationship (usually on partners, parents/siblings, siblings, etc.) problems? What are your personal thoughts and experiences on/with those types of forums, if any? Are they useful for assistance or should one avoid touching them? I'm not going in depth with my personal views on them, as it got derided as "babbling gobbledygook drivel" last time I did that. However, I don't really care for them much, and as they come across as quite toxic to me.
  13. [deleted, accidentally posted under the wrong discussion page]
  14. I sort of agree with the points your making here, but you somewhat missed the mark. However, I feel like that is more of me not clarifying myself here. Alright, sure they actually are just minor nuisances to the Free Cities in the current timeline of the books. Where I diverge from the books, is that the Dothraki would never have been responsible for the Century of Blood or carried out the Sarnoi genocide the way they did in the books' official timeline. Beyond horses, I envision them also raising animals like Sheep, Goats, and maybe even Cattle.
  15. As a preface, I'm not trying to insult the quality of GRRM's works. Nor am I suggesting that my "additions"/"improvements" are of superior quality to the original novels or if it would even be workable in the narrative. Instead, I'm just putting in what I think (heavy emphasis on "I think", as it is just my opinion) would be interesting to see in the world of ASOIAF. Here are some of my personal "changes" I would make: Dothraki: With the Dothraki, I wouldn't make them civilization destroyers, as they were in the novels' backstory. As I don't think relatively under equipped and fragmented nomads like the Dothraki would have the resources for that. In my "reimaging", they are just a loose collection of nomadic tribes/khalasars. They are still a dreaded terror for small villages and weaker pastoralists, a considerable threat to traveling merchants, and have been known to devastate armies sent against them with guerilla warfare. However, unlike the novels, the Dothraki won't be conquering/besieging major cities, as they don't have the weaponry, manpower, or the logistics for such operations. In other words, the Dothraki genocide of the Sarnori and the Century of Blood wouldn't have played out in my "version" as the way they happened in the official ASOIAF timeline. Thus, the Essosi city states consider the Dothraki to minor yet scary nuisances. They mostly leave the Dothraki alone, unless a Dothraki Khalasar raids one of their outposts/villages. In such a case, they will sent a punitive expedition to punish the offending Khalasars, and then leave. If anything, the Essosi states consider the Dothraki to be somewhat valuable trading partners. I picture the Dothraki trading animal furs and slaves to the Essosi city states, in exchange for livestock and iron tools. Dothraki subsistence also isn't dependent on pillaging. They extensively hunt and raise livestock (like sheep and goats) of their own. As mentioned in the previous paragraph, the Dothraki indulge in a lot of trading with other Essosi peoples. Last but not least, I would make the Dothraki much more akin to Great Plains Native Americans then to Turco-Mongols. Ironborn: Like the Dothraki, I would dampen the Ironborn obsession with raiding coastal settlements (though they still extensively practice it), and get rid of the taboo against trading. As no society could function without a viable source of subsistence/income. In fact, they have extensive trading contacts throughout Essos and the Sothoryosi islands. The Ironborn also don't contain any noble houses in their political system, though other Westerosi erroneously view their chiefdoms as a noble house. Similarly to how the ruling Northmen viewed the Northern Mountain Clans as petty noble houses in the novels. On that same note, Ironborn don't have a Monarchy in the classical sense of the term. They elect their kings, who are selected from the warrior elite. Relatives of Ironborn kings nominally don't have any power, but their brothers and sons have a strong possibility of succeeding him if he proves to be popular. Their islands would be more remote and fortified against foreign enemies. The Iron Islands would also be much larger (perhaps around the size of Alaska) and mountainous. So the Ironborn will have a sanctuary to hide in, if a punitive force shows up to wipe them out. As with the books, they are their own kingdom in all but name (to the point of having foreign policies independent of the other 7 kingdoms), and do everything in their power to undermine the Iron Throne's authority on them. They also despise how the other Westerosi try to enforce their morals on them and their attempts to criminalizing many Ironborn traditions and customs. Like their worship of the drowned god, slavery, and polygamy. Basilisk Isles: I would also put far more emphasis on the Basilisk Isles then in the actual novels (I think they were only referenced in four or five passing sentences in the books, and are almost totally ignored in supplementary materiel). In my "reimagining", the Basilisk Islanders would be a tribal confederation of piratical seafarers. Most of their numbers consist of natives, but they accept outsiders from all across the known world into their ranks from time to time. They often hijack merchant ships passing through the summer seas and raid other islands for slaves. Captives and loot seized in their raids will then be sold to slave markets in the Free Cities and Slaver's Bay. If a merchant ship doesn't want to be boarded, the captain would have to pay for the chieftain's (or "corsair king" to outsiders) permission to sail his waters. Basilisk Islander Chiefdoms also form overly convoluted and two faced arrangements with the warring Free Cities. Often times, Free City states will commission Basilisk Islander tribes to disrupt the shipping lanes of a rival. These "alliances" tend to be tenuous at best, and break and form on the drop of a hat. When a client Basilisk Islander tribe falls out of line, a Free City will send an punitive expedition to stamp them out. However, the Basilisk Islanders are far more then just over glorified pirates and privateers. Basilisk Islanders have been known to engage in peaceful trading with Essosi and Westerosi kingdoms and city states. They are also agriculturalists, and a primary food source for them is their own crops. In addition to the indigenous tribes, there are a number of rouge settlers (mostly criminals and runaway sailors from all across the nine Free Cities, but especially from Lys, Myr, and Tyrosh) that make their home in the isles. As with the natives, the settlers frequently attack passing ships and indulge in slave raids. The relationship between the settlers and the native Basilisk Islanders varies considerably, depending on the circumstances and individuals involved. Sometimes they collaborate in piratical endeavors rather seamlessly, but bouts of violence between settlers and native tribes do occur from time to time. Unlike colonial era Euro-American settlers in our world, settlers from the Free Cities don't have the manpower, equipment, or support to uproot the endemic powers. I will add more, if I can think of anything else. If you could add or change anything in ASOIAF's world building, what would it be?
  16. In terms of culture, politics/economics, and clothing styles (at least from what is described in books) of the Triachy Free Cities, would their closest real world analogues be? Me personally, I picture the Triarchy Free Cities vaguely resembling colonial era (especially between the 16th and 18th century ranges) European states, but without the gunpowder, tricorne hats, and powdered wigs, etc.. Along with significant influences from the late medieval and renaissance Italian city states and a touch of classical Greece mixed in. In your point of view, do any of you see my headcanon as an accurate interpretation? Why or why not?
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