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Callan S.

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  1. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    And if the writer did not reference it then it is not of the shortest path Or, u know, we could arc a little
  2. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Ah, but if you know how to destroy a soul, would you not also know how to destroy a god? Maybe? Anyway I think a theme is that the threat of eternal torture is just absolutely abstract - nobody gets it really. Unless you have an inverse fire you have no idea. The theme is, I think, that having really hard penalties doesn't really do anything about crime - it translates to real world incarceration systems quite well. Anyway, the schools of sorcery are complacent. The mandate even has the fact of it in their catchphrase and yet they just kind of ignore it. I'm pretty sure the Mop is a storage area for knock off damnation avoidance - each skeleton in each tree is a Mangecca (sp?) member put into a kind of cryogenic slumber.
  3. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Actually it draws an interesting link - anarcane ground is where the gods have walked the earth and so dream lucidly, not allowing the semantic cracks that sorcerers use to invoke/provoke effects in less lucidly dreamed locations. And Mimara contacted with something, some kind of divine being, through a chorae. Do chorae in some way summon gods? They are called tears of god, as well.
  4. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    It depends on the style of the book - for example, Mimara seeing through the chorae and seeing some sort of being 'drowzy with compassion'. I mean, what was that being? You can have a style of book where if people in it just put the pieces together then things wouldn't turn out so bad - that's basically tragedy.
  5. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Well, you said something like 'isn't imitating meaning pretty much what meaning is?'. Isn't that fairly scathing to the idea of meaning? Or what were you trying to convey with what I had quoted of you?
  6. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Ouch! Sick burn, man! It's...like...it's all just ink on dead tree pulp!
  7. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    I think one point of the novels is to navigate Earwa without really having hard information - indeed it being an 'objective meaning' actually means less objective information is there to be had. So you have to navigate it in a theory bubble, merely hypothetically estimating what is going on and what is relevant and not a red herring and merely hoping the bubble is the same shape as the state of things in the world. Because objective information and objective meaning clash with each other - as seen in the outside of Earwa, where the state of things align more to what a powerful being in it feels than anything else. The eye in the heart of the pict (spelling?), for example, where hell seeped through. Maybe his name was Luce?
  8. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    "Come to me, my child..." [coaxes the girl to jump to her death] God knows the riddle of steel
  9. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Because you guys can't seem to let it go as 'Well, you like that music but I don't'. Even if you were to say 'Well, it was a bait and switch - it seemed to be one type of music, but then it ending on another type that I don't like!' that'd be fair. But people seem to treat it as if it was wrong - not like someone liking dub step when you hate it, but the book was wrong and that can't be just let go as different tastes in music can. I mean the end of LOTRs is Frodo decides to keep the ring, but Golum tries to grab it but stumbles and falls in lava. Apart from it being a kind of success, it's not really an amazeballs ending. TUC has a similarly non amazeballs ending. Except Frodo falls in the lava. The last examination came down to a claim of inconsistency. I was holding off simply saying I can't see the difference between that and expectations of tropes being met. Consistency is just a trope. If it sucks to hear that, okay, but if it is the fact of the matter then live with the suck. It felt wrong to folk, then some reference to a technical reason is made up why it's not just feeling wrong but IS wrong. Just as much as depicting rape in a story is not technically wrong to do when taken from a broader perspective, there was nothing wrong about that ending in technical terms as much as there was nothing wrong with the ending of LOTR in technical terms. You're not being sure where to go from here isn't a quality of me, it's a quality of yourself - you're running out of technical complaints to make (up). The thing is I have no issue with someone being emotionally upset about the books. Hell, I have been and still are (and that, to a certain extent, I think, is the mark of actual literature as opposed to popcorn). But this whole urge to find a technical explanation, like it didn't do this or that thing that's oh so higher than tropes, it's just a lot of bullshit to hear. A lot of bullshit! Particularly by those who treat those who listen as showing some kind of weakness. It just seems a lot of mansplaining, avoiding emotional talk like I wouldn't want to say I was really sad watching the English patient. Oh, she died in a cave alone - this, uh, yes, it's technical faults in the movie, sure sure! Or how I picked at Coco after the movie, how photos didn't always exist rather than actually express my sadness from some of its elements. I know how to bullshit so I recognize it when I see it. Or whatever, let's all fortify ourselves from emotion and build little walls of technical complaints that really just dismantle down to the basic fact it was upsetting. We're all hip and cool and aloof and disaffectedly cool and other fantasies we drape about ourselves in forum or in real life. That or we're animals and our intellects are 95% subservient to our animal emotions - if we hate something, no matter how irrational the hate, intellect tries to make up something to sling at the the hated thing. It doesn't matter if it's a music you don't like but someone else does, hate is hate. And sure, hate, but spend the 5% you have free from that on something else because it's just boring otherwise. Just flowcharts.
  10. Callan S.

    Bakker LIV - Soul Sphincter

    Beyond just online disinhibition effect, not hearing what point? You've got the impression there's more to your 'I didn't like it' than just 'I didn't like it'. Page after page of 'I didn't like it' perfectly centered in the middle, getting bigger with each page, then at the end 'And then the no god just turned up and everyone died!'. The critique mirrors its own charge. What's at the center of your critique - just an apple core? "But you don't get my point, mannnn!" - pshh, makes you sound like Bakker himself to say that.
  11. Callan S.

    Bakker LIII - Sranc and File

    I'd say something, but on the principle of takes one to know one maybe you've got me tagged. Whether it's evangelism or sleep deprived vitriol, it's all pretty much the same; obsessive keyboard stroking.
  12. Callan S.

    Bakker LIII - Sranc and File

    What's the difference between a broken expectation in regard to a narrative trope and a charge of poor execution? To me, for any book ever, they are both the same thing. I mean, in the book the wizard of oz Dorothy gets some gold bangles at one point in Oz. Then they are never mentioned again. She adventures, gets back to Kansas and...not a word. It was probably a genuine fuck up of the author, who just forgot about them. To me, an author who lets quests and even themes die deliberately, I get it can look the same as the bangle example - and it is the same, really. The thing is if you theorised what it means that the bangles never showed up again and talked to Baum, he's probably get a Morgan Freeman thought and at that moment realised he fucked up. While Bakker would go on about the significance of significances dying - he'd wank on, because he's a schemer. It's like he's making pictures that are made with negative space. The absences of resolved quest and themes creates something by absence. But yeah, nothing is nothing. Less is less. In those terms I get people don't like the ending. I think Bakker's smart assery is that that readers aren't responsible for their expectations and reactions, but it might fall into being a private joke if the text really fails to deliver that idea to the reader as they fall into this or that expectation. I'm hoping maybe he's gotten past that somehow with a significant demographic and I'm not seeing it, but maybe he didn't make the jump.
  13. Callan S.

    Bakker LIII - Sranc and File

    If I wanted to just be happy/satisfied directly I would have stopped at the bardic priests rape of the bastard prince in Ishual. Stopping, essentially, at Acrackedmoon/'all you need is hate's fated 6 pages. It's clear to me that to get something out of it, you had to look at the bigger picture. I don't know how anyone could get through it wanting direct enjoyment with all the rape and death and torture involved. I mean, if anyone hates the end of Hamlet because everyone dies and it's a downer and there is no direct enjoyment, sure, I get that. But TAE ended as a tragedy. It seemed fated by the very first 6 pages to be a tragedy, and lo, it was a tragedy in the end. Further it's not just about enjoying tragedy perse, as some kind of escapism. Hamlet was a reference to various RL political situations and the second apocalypse series is a reference to the real world. It is a dark retelling of the six o'clock news. I would like it to be a happier, more directly enjoyable story, but it's a result of it mirroring the real world that it can't be. The real world being shit is why we can't have nice things...except for, IMO, sell out authors who will support utter escapism from the real worlds shitness (thus helping to perpetuate that shitness for short term monetary gain). On the other hand though, the six o'clock news doesn't have dragons or nonmen, so atleast it's not raw 6 o'clock we're facing - we get to have some genuine epic in there! Even if the epic sometimes undermines itself by being a tiny minded red pill...ie, undermines itself by going back to the 6 o'clock news. So indirectly I enjoyed the ending, it played out as the tragedy it had painted itself as. Actually in a weird way I found Kellhus's failure to be cathartic - Bakker had said we'd need therapy at the end, but actually it turned out to be a kind of therapeutic itself. At least for myself, anyway. So many books, TV shows and movies will just play on the idea the main character is under threat and play on it and play on it over and over and...it's just one continual fucking bluff. It was nice, just nice just for once, for it to not be a fucking bluff and he died. To not play into the hands of manipulator authors bullshitting me that the main character can die when he wont because they have a mortgage to pay. And I know how many readers actually want authors to do that manipulation, because it creates a just world. But I don't and it was nice to actually have a book for me - but it's not just me. There are dozens of us! [[ Sits back, waits for someone who says they can see how they read to now totally seriously give a scathing responce in reply as to 'the' assertion that a scant handful matter ]]
  14. Callan S.

    Bakker LIII - Sranc and File

    The issue being then then Earwa becomes the consults harem. Physical torture or spiritual torture? Earwa is the place of all trolley car problems. Granted though, perhaps a lot of readers found the consult the bad guy at the start, but might now say physical torture for a lifetime is better than an eternity of spiritual torture. That, IMO, is one of the things the series does - take a conception then take the reader on a trip through turning the conception on its head. I'm surprised at some of the people who say 'go team consult!' after all the 'objective morality!' insistence.
  15. Callan S.

    Bakker LIII - Sranc and File

    Given some readers support Kellhus, then this is a happy ending for them. And it still requires success to end on it. I'm not sure I can really see the difference. It's like wanting to see roadkill run over from an unpredictable direction - it's still roadkill.
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