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Garett Hornwood

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About Garett Hornwood

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    Landed Knight
  • Birthday October 20

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    http://mattries.wordpress.com

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    Collegedale, TN

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  1. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Finished The End of Days by Zecharia Sitchin, the last book of his seven book 'ancient astronaut theory' series. It was alright, but it just proved that the previous book could have been split between this and #5. I'm currently reading The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell.
  2. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    I finished Shadow & Claw by Gene Wolfe on Monday, this was an omnibus of the first two volumes of The Book of the New Sun tetralogy. I thought The Shadow of the Torturer was very interesting even though I didn't like the first-person point-of-view narration, but I was looking forward to The Claw of the Conciliator. Unfortunately I wasn't impressed with the second story for numerous reasons, but the nonsensical play that took up an entire chapter just to set up something in the next short chapter didn't sit well. I've started reading the last book in Zecharia Sitchin's ancient astronaut series, The End of Days.
  3. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Well I had a busy end of the last week. Thursday I completed The Histories by Herodotus, this was a book I read at home in 10-20 page increments and really enjoyed it. I completed Miracle at Philadelphia by Catherine Drinker Bowen on Friday, this was my primary read (that I take to work to read during breaks) and there was some issues with it but it was a good historical read detailing the Constitutional Convention. My home read is The Political Writings of St. Augustine, which presents Augustine's political ideas that influenced medieval thought. My primary read is my first fantasy (or might it be science fiction?) book of the year, Shadow & Claw by Gene Wolfe. This is an omnibus of the first two books of The Book of the New Sun.
  4. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Catching up a bit since my last post... Finished The Cosmic Code by Zecharia Sitchin, this was the sixth book in his ancient astronaut theory series and frankly it felt like it could have been split up between the fifth and whatever is coming in the seventh. Next came Divide and Conquer by Jeff Rovin, the seventh book in the Op-Center series, frankly this was a book with one storyline that was written very well and one written poorly unfortunately for Rovin the poorly written one revolved around the series main character. Then I completed a biography of John Harvey Kellogg by Richard W. Schwarz, a health reformer (yes, he created the cereal but his brother is the one that made it commercially popular) in the late 19th/early 20th centuries. I've started reading Miracle in Philadelphia by Catherine Drinker Bowen as my primary read, but later this week I'll be finishing up my home read The Histories by Herodotus.
  5. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Yesterday I finished Raise the Titanic! by Clive Cussler, written almost a decade before the actual shipwreck was found (in two pieces) yet besides that the main plot was a fun story to read but unfortunately the majority of the subplots undermine the overall book and Cussler's decisions at the end of the book related to his main character (Dirk Pitt) were annoying. I've started reading the sixth book of Zecharia Sitchin's ancient astronaut series, The Cosmic Code.
  6. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    This past Sunday I finished Soldier, Sailor, Frogman, Spy, Airman, Gangster, Kill or Die: How the Allies Won on D-Day by Giles Milton. A look at the first 24 hours of the Allied invasion of Normandy from the men and women, from both sides, who lived it. It was a nice historical narrative, unfortunately Milton used so many eyewitnesses that when he returned to some it took me a bit to remember them. Overall nice, but problematic. I'm currently reading Raise the Titanic! by Clive Cussler.
  7. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    This past weekend I finished two books. The first was The Rise and Fall of the British Empire by Lawrence James, it was a fantastic overview of 400-years of history concerning the cultural, economic, martial, and political elements that went into the formation, endurance, and end of the Empire. The second was a biography of W.W. Prescott by Gilbert M. Valentine. My next read will be a history of D-Day from the perspectives of numerous individuals who lived through it: Soldier, Sailor, Frogman, Spy, Airman, Gangster, Kill or Die: How the Allies Won on D-Day by Giles Milton.
  8. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Finished Founding Rivals by Chris DeRose, though it was good book describing how James Madison and James Monroe came to be standing against one another for a House seat for the 1st Congress under the Constitution and how the outcome probably saved the Constitution from getting scraped by a second Constitutional Convention. I've started The Rise and Fall of the British Empire by Lawrence James.
  9. Garett Hornwood

    First Quarter 2019 Reading

    Hi everyone, Based on the beginning of the December 2018 Reading thread, I thought we'd try a multi-month thread to begin the year and instead naming it after a season (because of hemispheres) I'd just go generic with First Quarter to cover January through March. I'm starting off the year with three biographies/histories. Founding Rivals: Madison vs. Monroe by Chris DeRose is my primary read to start off the year because it was a Christmas present from my aunt. My first "home" read of the year will be Herodotus' The Histories. And my first "tame"/religious weekend read will be W.W. Prescott by Gilbert M. Valentine. So what are you reading to start off the New Year?
  10. Garett Hornwood

    December 2018 Reading

    I completed 7 books this month and here's a quick recap of them. Divine Encounters by Zecharia Sitchin, this is a companion book to his ancient astronaut Earth Chronicles series but it hardly went over new material. Earth, Air, Fire, Water: Tales from the Eternal Archives #2 edited by Margaret Weis, this collection of short stories were as high quality as the first Archives collection but there was one gem. James White: Innovator and Overcomer by Gerald Wheeler, a biography of one of the three founders of the Seventh-day Adventist church. The Annals of Imperial Rome by Tacitus, probably the classical writer's best work (though unfortunately didn't survive complete) and a fascinating read. The Guide for the Perplexed by Maimonides was an interesting look into how Jewish religious thought and ancient Greek philosophy are synthesized through rationality. Fire & Blood by George R.R. Martin, a little known fantasy author who is fleshing out the historical background of his world. And finally Teaching History: A Seventh-day Adventist Approach by Gary Land, a small book that examines how Christian historians should approach the teaching and writing of history by staying true to their faith but within professional standards. For the year I read a personal best 83 books for over 30000 pages.
  11. Garett Hornwood

    November 2018 Reading - remember, remember the blade of Ember

    I finished up November by completing Iceberg by Clive Cussler, the third Dirk Pitt book though second published. While it was a quick paced book, it was a adventure/thriller book of it's time (the mid-1970s) and so a lot of things didn't age well namely something of things Pitt thinks, says, and does. Honestly I'm not expecting much from these early books in Cussler's Dirk Pitt series so I wasn't surprise at the issues and the fact that Pitt was jerk (though less of one than in The Mediterranean Caper). My last post I said I was going to be reading The Guide for the Perplexed by Moses Maimonides as my primary read, but after one day of reading it at work I though it would be a better decision to make it my "home" read where I'd get through at least 10 pages a day. Over the past week I've found this working a lot better as I'm absorbing and understanding more of Maimonides treatise than I felt I was the one day I took it to work to read on my breaks.
  12. Garett Hornwood

    November 2018 Reading - remember, remember the blade of Ember

    I finished several books this week, the first was Legends: Tales from the Eternal Archives #1 edited by Margaret Weis. This is a collection of 19 stories and vast majority of them were at least okay but a large number of them were very good. The second was Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson, which I found really fascinating especially in seeing a younger Dalinar and comparing him to the older Dalinar that we've already met. Some of Dalinar's interactions with Lift, Cultivation, Odium, and various others were also good. I think Sanderson did a good job to change things around to build the overall world while still progressing the narrative. Obviously the length of the book was a bit of a drawback and some of the open-ended stuff in which you couldn't tell if Sanderson was creating mysteries to be solved later or just plain mysteries that will never be solves was a bit concerning, yet I really enjoyed the book. I also read another straight-forward nature book meant for children with Paddletail the Beaver and His Neighbors, this nothing more than something light on the weekends to read so as to have a change of pace to my reading. So the current primary book I'm reading is a ARC of The Reign of the Kingfisher by T.J. Martinson, which is about man taking hostages demanding the Chicago PD release information about the supposed death of a real-life superhero/vigilante (the titular) Kingfisher and several characters working on their own (for different reason) to figure out what happened 30 years before. So far it's a cliche filled but engaging read that has a mystery feel to it and I think there are three ways it could end. I'm working my way through the preface and analysis of my edition of The Guide for the Perplexed by Moses Maimonides that I'll really get into after finishing the Kingfisher book. And I'll be finishing up another weekend read of another children's nature book, Wild Creatures in Winter.
  13. Garett Hornwood

    November 2018 Reading - remember, remember the blade of Ember

    I'm currently reading Brandon Sanderson's Oathbringer. So far I'm liking how he's pacing things out in the series and the book (I'm approximately 35% through already). Plus I just read Dalinar's first interaction with Lift which was pretty funny.
  14. A brief look back at my reading from my last post. I completed Leaves of Grass: First and "Death-Bed" Editions by Walt Whitman, this one took me over a year to read because I'm not good with poetry and I've forsworn them in the future as a result. I then finished Light Bearers: A History of the Seventh-day Adventist Church by Richard W. Schwarz & Floyd Greenleaf. And yesterday I finished a re-read the sixth book of the Op-Center series, State of Siege by Jeff Rovin.
  15. Last Friday I finished The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party by Michael F. Holt, almost 1300 pages of text and notes about the 20-year lifespan of a political party that was crucial in understanding the antebellum period and the onset of the Civil War. This was Holt's academic magnum opus and it is extremely detailed not only telling the history of politics on the national level but state, county, and even cities. Took me over a month to read, but was worth it. This past weekend I read another children's book just as a breath of fresh air in opposition to the density of Holt. The Mallards and Their Neighbors by Neil Wayne Northey, a simple nature book for kids original published in the 1930s that you can just enjoy. Sunday I started The Mediterranean Caper by Clive Cussler, first published Dirk Pitt novel though chronologically the second. I'll be finishing this book tomorrow, but the 45 year difference between now and then is really showing. I'm going to rate this lower than Pacific Vortex! for several reasons, but I'm not going to stop reading the series because I knew what I was getting into and frankly I'm more interested in the books in the middle of the series which I had listened to via audiobooks when I was in high school.
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