Jump to content

karaddin

Members
  • Content Count

    7,915
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by karaddin

  1. Especially with prior rulings essentially to the effect that US cops have no responsibilities to protect people at all. It's a fucking joke
  2. The guy you want to arrest can't comply with your orders, giving you an excuse to arrest him, if you don't actually tell him what the order is *guy tapping his head gif* Yeah this is the video of the guy breaking the windows, don't have the one where people followed him and get a closer look handy at the moment but everything about him including his new protection equipment is screaming "undercover cop/agent provocateur". Some people are claiming he's been identified and is indeed a cop, the cops are denying this but I'm not exactly feeling a lot of trust in their words at the moment
  3. He sure as fuck looked like it in his shiny new equipment, freshly purchase for the modern riot provocateur. Theyve just arrested a CNN crew for....existing? Broadcasting what they're doing before they're about to just brutally slaughter people? Fuck knows.
  4. Try uninstalling the app itself from powershell as well - I'm not sure what the app name would be so you might need to list them all first and find the right one. You'll need to run powershell as administrator as well to do the below. (Get-AppxPackage).Name Get-AppxPackage <name> | Remove-AppxPackage The first will list all installed packages, the second will uninstall it. The second command is the same way you'd uninstall the Windows Store to try deleting the folders after removing the store, you'll just need to plug the appropriate name for the store in rather than the game name.
  5. @Aemon Stark I think all of those criticisms are fair and I'd agree with them. I think you're probably spot on with them trying to cram too much into the episode counts that they have, which often seems to lead to feeling like not enough happens even when you're trying to fit too much in. Definitely plenty of room for improvement. I guess they'd need confidence that they're going to get subsequent seasons to tackle an arc that truly goes past the end of the current season.
  6. I'm sure that if we were talking about a common Briton potentially being charged with an offense related to dangerous driving that we'd have just as robust a defense of them, and how there is no need to enforce the laws, right? Or poor people of colour that receive fines for breaching lockdown rules? (I don't actually know if clearly racist applications of fines has been a thing in the UK, but it very much has in Aus) Obviously the testing his eyes excuse is such transparent bullshit its meant to be an insult to the public and the idea of oversight, but if he's going to use something that would be a criminal offense for anyone else as his excuse for breaching a different law, thereby confessing to the driving related criminal offense, then he should be charged with it. Because the law is meant to apply to everyone.
  7. I'd find it a lot easier to engage with the, in this case very valid, criticism of the show and it's writing without the histrionics about how awful it all is. This was absolutely a flaw in the writing and there should have been much longer consequences for it. If they wanted to end with her being trusted and accepted then the others should have at least have addressed it and acknowledged that it was under extreme duress and thus they'll accept she's already suffering enough for it, but it shouldn't have have just been ignored. I also agree that I did not like the way all the Borg still in stasis pods, many of the exbees, and especially Hugh were killed off. I did think that was gratuitous.
  8. I think I'm starting to see why I have such different interpretations of some of these characters to others, we read drastically different personality traits into some of these things.
  9. 100% on this. Any institution that sees it as an opportunity to cut staff/costs is going to be in for a disappointing shock for either them, their students, or unfortunately most likely the remaining staff that are now expected to do more with less help. Online delivery is its own thing and needs curriculum design which takes that into account, and adequately resource the teaching staff to have enough people available to support students. I've done some humanities subjects via distance which had completely separate assessments in some cases for online students which were designed around students not being able to meet up in a group. It was great, and those subjects were the most I've ever enjoyed studying and the most enthusiastic I've been. The ideal that I'd like to see, and cynically don't expect to, is that institutions which really commit to online learning after this will bring on additional staff with the expertise to make it work, and won't reduce their investment in the existing in-class teaching at all. They aren't mutually exclusive, they're just the potential for them to compete for resources. My workplace was a straggler on this front before covid-19, but the academic staff pulled a gargantuan effort at the start of the crisis to move everything online. There are still some things, particular more towards the hard sciences, which are going to be much harder or currently even impossible to deliver online, labs for example have been postponed until students are able to do them in person again. I think there is the potential to improve online delivery in this space though. Some or even most of the chemistry labs I've done (which is admittedly first year, but first year is also where the student count is highest) could have at least taught/reinforced the actions that you need through virtual labs, along with the emphasis on good lab note keeping practices. What it could not do even with actual virtual reality is teach the actual physical actions associated with various tasks - just the set up of the space, titration etc. Only by attempting to do as much as we can online will we really establish the bounds of what we can actually do. One of the biggest hurdles to convincing people to even try it is to get them to accept its possible though, and the crisis has given a lot of people a crash course in how much we can achieve.
  10. I'm always wary of the pushback against online learning in that yes the experience of in person teaching is better, but online learning can make it accessible to people who would never be able to do it otherwise and that's still a hell of a lot better than nothing. It can be much more accessible for single parents, for people with certain disabilities etc. Its just another tool to use, and of course it needs to be tailored appropriately, including not expecting to be able to duplicate testing methods. In general though I think more tests need to move away from being closed book - yes you may need to be able to perform some tasks without internet access, but for the vast majority of people in the vast majority of situations the internet will be available. The ability to quickly find what you need on the internet, understand it and know how to use it is more important than what is known for immediate recall. In the above example of students quite blatantly cheating - that gives you a clear avenue for approaching the same "assessment" accepting that people are going to use google and still structure it in a way that punishes poor google usage.
  11. Sorry to throw back to the off topic conversation, but...Dante Basco? I think it's fair to say that the problem is with Bernie for why he couldn't convince more voters, however I do think there is a point to be made that the problem is with voters that from a large field which included a great many better options than Biden the voters still picked Biden. My answer to this would not be any reduction in democracy though, please don't parse it that way. And I suspect the reason why is already answered in this thread, the overwhelming fear of more Trump pushed people to pick who they felt was the safest bet. I disagree with them, but that perception of safeness is self reinforcing in this case.
  12. It's been a couple of years now but I'm pretty sure it was fine on this front as well. Both that one and the one on the Quarian ark by Cat Valente were actually good - much better than your normal tie in books.
  13. I also have to admit that, as shallow as it is, the visuals of these new shows is integral to them working for me. They did the best they could with the tech they had at the time, but it never *felt* like a vision of the future to me, and Ive always been really bothered by the interfaces on some of the older/smaller devices such as earlier tricorders and later the piles of electronic tablets in DS9. Discovery, Picard and the Pike show are coming along now the effects are good enough to sell it for me. I think the seriousness of Trek made it harder for me to just go with suspension of disbelief, it never bothered me in Farscape but it's batshit plot and Muppets immediately put me in a different headspace where I'm overlooking the shortcomings.
  14. Bolded - or indeed some have also been fans for much less time. I watched voyager semi regularly as a teen, and the odd episode of DS9, but definitely wasn't a "Trek fan". I've always yearned for more serialised stories, maybe because some of my very first kids shows were anime/anime based that told a season long story, and the highly episodic nature of Trek wasn't my cup of tea. I make no claim of ownership of Trek, and I'm always up front about that. My statement is that "I'm enjoying this, I'm part of the audience for this" with maybe a little "it might be off-putting to long term fans that are looking for new stories in the same vein and tone as the old one, I can't speak to that, but it may also be drawing in a new audience like me". I got interested in Discovery in the run up to its release, that interest led me to watch a "best of TNG" list, then the full run of DS9 - which yes, was indeed more to my tastes with a long story being told - and I've really enjoyed Discovery. I think it's far from perfect, but I think there's a solid foundation with characters I like and I'm frankly baffled by the interpretations of the characters I see where they're just fractious assholes - clearly we parse some of these social interactions differently. Picard was less good, I still enjoyed it overall but I would have enjoyed the story that Chabon wanted to tell significantly more. My goal in watching these shows is to try to enjoy them though, I forgive the flaws where I can and focus on the things that work. To answer how the question of how they won, Wert has already done so but: They convinced the Federation to give a shit, had the ban on synths overturned, exposed the truth of the Romulan operation that was behind the attack on Mars, brought a new settlement of the synth "species" into the Federation, and most of the characters seemed to end on turning points in their character arcs. Yes, they had been drinking the pain away, but at the end of the season they're opening up to each other, they're forming new relationships, realising that living for revenge (Seven) and refusing to let yourself connect to and care about others (Rios) are not good ways to live. Most importantly for the show, Picard found himself. Jean-Luc Picard should not be hiding from the world on his vineyard just because he lost one fight to keep the Federation better, he should not be standing by while people engage in a race to the bottom because no one is modeling the best that we can be. He should be standing up there, demanding they be better and "making it so" even if it takes his life. Which is what he did. Again, the season wasn't remotely perfect, but it was not a dark ending or a defeat.
  15. I made myself want to play it again as well lol. And yeah no way that there wasn't DLC planned, it was a flashing neon ad for it and the book isn't even the same incident that's presumably being reported at the end of the game is it? The book is like halfway through the voyage
  16. Except both Picard and both seasons of Discovery have depicted those fighting for our better nature winning? Not without cost sure, but they won. Anyway I think its pretty clear we're never going to even see face to face, let alone eye to eye on this, and I get pretty frustrated by what (to me) seems unrelenting negativity and refusal to give it even the tiniest of chances. So lets just agree to ignore each others opinions on this one. You don't like it, I do.
  17. I was really apprehensive about a book set before the trip to Andromeda primarily on Cora but it really worked, and as I said - greatly enhanced the themes of the game and the game itself as a result. It also explains some of the decisions in ME:A that are a bit questionable and not adequately answered within the game - specifically addresses why Ryder Snr makes Ryder Jnr the Pathfinder beyond the mystery that you work through in the game.
  18. Thanks for the confirmation. And yeah that's probably true, I only read it the once now and the enormously long battle has faded to the point that its mostly just the big emotional beats that stand out - it probably works better for me now than it did then.
  19. Oh and this is definitely a criticism of the execution in ME:A - the AI theme doesn't really pop just from the game, it took reading NK Jemisin's prequel book for it to actually realise exactly what they were going for. Apparently when you get really talented writers to write for you, you wind up with better written material - who knew? The game is considerably stronger if you're reading that theme into what's going on, but the game doesn't do a good job of showing that its meant to be there itself.
  20. Yeah, they attempted (and failed) to sidestep the issue of colonialism by having no species actually native to the cluster of Andromeda it's set in. There's many ruins from a now departed alien species which are referred to as remnant tech, this species had tech on a level that's way beyond the Reapers. At least in certain areas, the Reapers might have had better weapons and shielding, but this species built truly gigantic underground complexes (city size/larger) which were capable of terraforming basically all suitable planets they constructed it on basically with the flick of a switch from the space station that was their command hub. Including things like scrubbing radiation from the atmosphere all with the generated energy fields. It was powered by dark energy. There's also a cosmic phenomenon, called the scourge, that's basically a weird semi solidified dark energy structure that is drawn to/reacts explosively in contact with tech and biological matter but can exist in contact with planetary surfaces. Spoiler tagging things you only learn further in the story There's primary antagonist aliens are the Kett, who are clearly not locals right from the start as they're also instigating remnant and are hostile without opportunity for diplomacy. Finally you have the Angara. They initially seem to be locals to the area, although you learn pretty quickly they've only been around for less than a thousand years so clearly doesn't evolve in the area. They've got some unusual electrical abilities, and are peaceful - the MW species start settling alongside them in some cases but it is agreed upon rather than hostile colonialism. None of which gives away that one of the main themes is actually still AI, but a different perspective from the original trilogy looking for ways it's compatible with organic life rather than antagonistic. The other beats that were clearly meant to build into the main themes for the series in DLC and sequels was the whole refugee thing. They don't know at the time of leaving about what is coming, they think they're embarking on an adventure, but the financial backers for the project did know. They're essentially a backup lifepod for the Milky way species and the main character starts to piece this together as you're unable to contact the MW at all during the game. The local conflict with the Kett is wrapped up and the game ends basically with a cliff hanger about the Quarian ship (which was a year or so behind them) being in trouble and the realisation of their situation about to hit them. Hence being really pissed that BW just dropped it instead of putting the work in to fix the problems and improve with what followed.
  21. The biggest thing for me was that it was a set up game, we got all the set up for the most interesting parts of the game (to me) and because BioWare were scared of backlash they just dropped it instead of putting the work in. I want the part of the game where the people in Andromeda realise the Milky Way was invaded by Reapers, that whatever happened they aren't in contact anymore and that they are not colonists - they're refugees. And possibly the last of their species. I want to know what's going on with the Quarian ark. I want to know more about the scourge and the ones who made it, vs the ones we find the remnants of. I want more with Ryder as she developed from a newb goofball to a more competent and responsible goofball. I really liked the change from Shepard, and I liked most of the characters and agree that them being weirdos that aren't necessarily representative of their species is intended. They left because they couldn't find a place to fit in. I'm not saying it was perfect, the criticisms of the writing are probably fair for the most part, but there was still a ton in there I liked. And the mobility of the game play with the jet pack is really hard to go back from, and the smoothness of the movement is a huge plus mark for it over DA: I when you're talking about whether you can handle the open world stuff or not. Also setting up outposts makes way more sense as an open world mechanic than setting up tents in DA:I did.
  22. Brook and I have thought that the way the couples either live together or die together, none are split by death, was probably heavily influenced by RJ and Harriet's feelings about his approaching mortality and knowing this would happen to her. Which is entirely reasonable, again that isn't a criticism. The things missing from the ending which most stand out to me are the resolutions to secondary and tertiary plot threads/characters. What did RJ really have in mind for Narishma "following after Rand"? What was Logain's "glory" meant to be? Because I don't buy what we saw matched Min's vision. Do we know if the enslavement of all the male Aiel channelers who had gone off to fight the shadow over the years was from RJ or Brandon? That one was an emotional punch that really landed for me, whichever of them gets credit.
  23. Lol. Look your point is fair. I think if you look back through my posts in the last few days you'll see I'm making no judgement of the man though. Its just a little flavour or colour around how I read the book, that's all. A laugh of love.
  24. I just take such a fundamentally different message away from the new shows. It's not saying we can't be better, it's saying that in order to be better we always need to be fighting as individuals to keep our society better. That collectively being individuals is the only way we get that better society. I guess if that "better society" you're seeing is one where we've won the fight permanently and don't need to fight for it as individuals anymore then I'm not seeing something different to you, I just like it and you don't. I see something in the Trek we're currently getting that I'm not seeing in other properties, so I guess that just makes me the audience for the new Trek.
  25. I'd always read it as the other way around. And a desire be was so convinced could never be realised it's repressed to the point he didn't realise he was putting it into the books, which is why it's often not even sexualized. I like this approach, neatly dodges centering Rand on their relationship as you said. It probably comes down to the actresses. You see them meet and have lightning between them on screen, like has happened in many cases where it wasn't even intended, then this could really work. If they don't have that kind of chemistry I think just go with the platonic approach. Just don't make straight men the judge of whether that chemistry is there and we're good :p
×
×
  • Create New...