Jump to content

DaveSumm

Members
  • Content Count

    2,899
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by DaveSumm

  1. So why did he angrily say to Nute Gunray “I want that treaty signed!”? I’ve never seen any evidence that Lucas had a coherent plan written out for Palpatine in the PT. All theories are just conjecture, the trilogy just fundamentally doesn’t make sense.
  2. Oh god, the scene in RotS where Anakin tells Windu that Palpatine is the Sith and he says “We must move quickly if the Jedi order is to survive” ... and then walks away at the exact same pace as before. It’s not like it’s, oh, the worst thing to happen in thousands of years? Nah, no need to run. Pretty much every scene on Coruscant feels like they’re in a library and they’ll get shushed if they cause too much fuss.
  3. It sounds like the video was awful, but as usual with these things, I’m more confused how anyone can be stupid enough to share it when it’s so obviously a bad career move. Especially with what happened to James Gunn.
  4. On the surface, the idea that James Earl Jones’s voice is a result of his breathing apparatus doesn’t seem so bad, but ultimately JEJ is Darth Vader. It’s that vocal performance that we latched on to in the OT, and there’s no attempt to connect the prequels to that. You’re right, a colder and more methodical kind of evil would’ve worked better for Anakin. This is part of what continues to baffle me about Hayden Christensen’s casting: he looks, sounds, and acts, nothing like Jake Lloyd, James Earl Jones or Sebastian Stan. Or has the physique of David Prowse. I can’t for the life of me picture what it was that made the casting people go “Wow, this is our guy!” All that aside, it’s been mentioned before but HUGE props to Rebels for the scene where
  5. Seems like perfectly Mandalorian related content to me, it’s from the Mandalorian documentary featuring the makers of ... The Mandolorian. I don’t agree that all of what he says is fully intentional in the prequels, but totally agree that Filoni clearly has a passion for Star Wars, and he’s absolutely the right man for the job.
  6. Right, but a gunship doesn’t help in this situation. If your shoot at Mando, he’s gonna stay in cover somewhere near Grogu. They aren’t trying to kill Mando or Grogu, that’s not the aim. With troops on the ground, there’s a risk from Mando’s POV that they fan out and approach the hill from all sides where he can’t defend. So he goes to meet them while they’re still clustered, leaving Grogu vulnerable. OK, the second wave was convenient for action purposes, maybe they were supposed to land together and got delayed. I dunno. Still, doesn’t even crack the top 20 of flawed Star Wars plans. It was just awesome to see.
  7. On the tactics: was the plan not to draw Mando away from Grogu with the Stormtroopers at the bottom, then send in the Darktroopers to grab him? Seems about as good a plan as any other I’ve come to expect from Star Wars?
  8. Fairly average episode, didn’t strongly dislike or like anything. I can’t quite put my finger on what it was about Book’s story, but I didn’t really follow what the stakes were or why certain things were happening, almost like the exposition was a bit weak for a relatively simple premise. I didn’t realise the locusts were such a problem until they suddenly pulled a finale out of the bag, in which Burnham once again manages to do what Book’s “best scientists” couldn’t: amplify something. With a 900 year old ship. It’s interesting to see more and more people have negative opinions about the Federation, seems more likely that they know more about the Burn than they’re saying. On the Adira scene; I’m happy that they addressed their pronouns, although there’s an argument that it wasn’t quite the usual Star Trek method of doing so. TOS gets praise for depicting a bridge crew who, in the 1960’s, looked like an enemy combatant of a war that was currently being waged, and an enemy of a Cold War also going on, and a woman for whom civil rights protests were ongoing, all alongside white Americans. They didn’t ever mention this fact; it was just so far past the resolution of all these things that nobody cared anymore. They were done patting themselves on the back, it was just old news. With Adira, I might’ve preferred that they mentioned nonchalantly that they prefer they/them, not she, and Stamets just doesn’t even blink, like it’s entirely normal for someone to ask that. The way it’s presented is that in 1000 years, people like Adira would still feel awkward and uncomfortable asking this, and wait a few weeks before bringing it up. But, as I said, it’s better that they address it than not at all, I just would’ve liked to see some indication of progress, rather than a scene that could just as easily have been set in 2020.
  9. I can’t find any comment from him that backs this up with anything. What exactly is less safe about our process, what hasn’t been done that the FDA would do? Should we complete the review, then sit on it for a week so everyone feels reassured? Either the process is sound or it isn’t.
  10. It’s amazing how much the ‘Vader is Luke’s father’ twist fucks with the timeline. Clearly in A New Hope this is all supposed to be way more than 19 years ago (“I haven’t gone by that name since ... oh, before you were born”) but I guess if Luke was hidden from him, it needs to be Luke’s age. Ewan McGregor is still, 20 years on, 14 years away from being Alec Guiness’s age in ANH. So is Joel Edgerton (young Owen) away from Uncle Owen, 14 years. And Hayden Christensen? You have to wait till 2059 for him to be same age as RotJ Anakin. I suppose you have the added issue of the twist requiring Anakin to be both pupil and then friend to Obi-Wan and Jedi Knight. So unless you filmed Episode I a solid decade before II, you’re kinda stuck with that problem. Unless they’re all just super old when they met, and Anakin starts training as a middle aged man.
  11. It’s pretty damn strange that Roddenberry made a pilot in 1964 and it’s getting picked up in 2020. That’s gotta be some kind of record.
  12. I recall an interview where he said his true love is editing. But to get the editing done as he likes, he needs certain shots so he needs to direct. And to have them exist at all, he needs to write it. But it’s all for the endgame of his favourite part, editing. It does bug me that he constantly moans about people ‘yelling at you’ if you make the films you want to make, and there’s no room for experimentalism anymore. Twenty years is plenty of time to be more honest, and just own up to making shit films. I think it’s a fun enough movie on its own, I just don’t buy the character as Han Solo, nor do I think he had a background worth telling. It might’ve been better to take the basic plot of Solo and wrap it round a new character, and set up Maul as a villain for some stuff set between III and IV. Tie in a Kenobi series, Rebels etc. But yea, I don’t see why I’d watch any of the PT or ST again. The ST has the bizarre property that each film ruins the others more than itself; TFA could’ve build up to something, but the other two proved it didn’t. TLJ revealed that Rey is nobody and anybody can be special, and TROS quashed it. And TROS spends more time undoing stuff from TLJ to be good in its own right. If I watched either TFA or TLJ with no context, I could believe they were the weak link in an otherwise good trilogy. The ‘RotJ’ of the ST, if you will. But they just don’t gel together at all.
  13. We’re a way off having more doses than people willing to take them, my only worry is the admin delays around people not wanting them. If you don’t want it, you need to get the fuck out the queue quick. I’m dreading reading about how we could’ve vaccinated X amount of people but Y% didn’t show up or some bollocks. I just can’t picture anti-vaxers having the decency to properly alert the NHS if they don’t plan on having it.
  14. Is it not possible that they’re just better movies? Given the widespread critical and fan acclaim for IV and V, if not VI? Including fans who didn’t watch until the hype came back around with the prequels (myself included) and then again with the sequels? IV and V only started ‘it all’ because they were great movies. The prequels were poorly received because they were poorly made. The sequels were poorly received because they were poorly planned.
  15. Quite. As @Heartofice points out, it’s exactly as good as it’s meant to be. If the vast majority of its fans wouldn’t change a line in it, what’s wrong with it? The first two were, by any metric you wish to pick, phenomenally successful. Back to the Future is regularly referred to as one of the greatest films of all time, and has one of the best scripts, but does it make 100% sense? Is it airtight? Is Biff a realistic villain? Nope, but the movie is entirely comfortable being what it is. A movie doesn’t have to be high art to be great.
  16. Same, although my hair is driving me nuts so I’m looking forward to that more than I thought I would. I very much fear that the case for restrictions will be far harder to make when there’s a reduced death rate attached to it, and from a personal risk perspective, Jan-Apr could be the worst period for me. I just hope the roll out can keep up with the drop off in vigilance.
  17. Which reminds me, it was interesting to me that Ahsoka mentioned that his skill should be “left to fade away”. Have we ever had an explicit mention of what happens to untrained force-sensitive people before? I remember being confused about it in The Phantom Menace, when the Jedi council refuse Anakin’s training. Surely any training is better than leaving him to be angry, emotional and very naturally talented? But this makes more sense; if it’s not nurtured, it will fade away. Yea totally agree, I love the show. My SO does to and she doesn’t particularly care about Star Wars generally. It goes to show how cool the universe is, that all fans have wanted for a long while is something that depicts it and respects it without anything else earth shattering. The episodic films by their nature have to rock the boat in some fashion, and everyone just ends up pissed off about something. I love the relatively simple stories The Mandalorian is telling.
  18. Ahsoka was as close as anyone to Anakin (barring Obi-Wan) during her training, so she knows better than anyone alive what an emotional attachment can lead to. In terms of somebody giving us exposition on Grogu, but who would be wary of training him, you literally couldn’t do better than Ahsoka out of everyone in the whole galaxy. Also she seemed to cast doubt on how much of an infant he really is. He’s young, but he’s been trained by ‘multiple masters’. He seems to have regressed due to the fucked up stuff that has been done to him in trying to extract his midichlorians or whatever they were doing. Also worth pointing out that Ahsoka left the order while she was still a padowan to Anakin; she’s never trained anybody. So I can definitely understand why she’d be very scared of getting it wrong with Grogu.
  19. Well whether you think it makes sense or not is up to you, but the episode clearly set out the problem; she could’ve wiped out the village easily, but not without civilian deaths. She needed Mando to deal with that problem while she did most of the badassery.
  20. If I didn’t come here every week and see the names written down, I honestly don’t think I could name a single crew member outside Saru, Burnham, Tilly and Stamets.
  21. Plus, they have programmable matter now... so you’d think it’d be easy. I forget why Stamets is so critical to the system, what exactly is special about him?
  22. Nice. Although from Starfleet’s point of view, surely the obvious choice would be a 32nd century savvy, qualified commander. They’re a little depleted from their hay day, but they must be able to spare a commander. Especially given the insane importance and tactical advantage of a spore-drive in a post-Burn world. Kind of a T’Pol for the ship, to make sure things are going smoothly and to have an experienced and well travelled officer on board.
  23. Rebels spoilers: EDIT: not sure why that’s all a quote...
×
×
  • Create New...