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Le Cygne

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  1. Le Cygne

    Rant and Rave without Repercussions [S7 Leaks Edition]

    NCW: "You always look for little clues... There are a lot of, all throughout season 8, moments where you go, ahhh, I remember that in season 2, and now... Surely at one point we're going to meet again, there must be some payoff, and now..."
  2. Updates: Sansa/Sandor - Part 1, Part 2 Sansa/Sandor and Jaime/Brienne - Beauty and the Beast parallels Welcome to Rethinking Romance, Part 2. I will be your host as we explore the writing of romance in the series. THREAD TOPIC: The writing of romance in the stories covered. The assumption is these are written as romances. If you don't agree, please take that to another thread. This is a collection of rereads, not a debate thread. Positive comments are welcome, but please take negative comments to another thread. There are many other threads. The purpose of the thread is to provide a resource for readers to enjoy the contributions from the individual rereads of the presenters for each story covered. Please note the author's context for ages in Westeros. And in the tradition of the classics, romantic themes are often introduced early in the stories, and explored as the stories unfold. Stories: Arya/Gendry - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8a, Part 8b, Part 9a, Part 9b, Part 9c Jaime/Brienne - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 Sansa/Sandor - Part 1, Part 2 Sansa/Sandor and Jaime/Brienne - Beauty and the Beast parallels Jon/Ygritte - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10 Dany/Drogo - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 Robb/Jeyne - Part 1, Part 2 Asha/Qarl - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 Renly/Loras - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 Sam/Gilly - Part 1, Part 2
  3. Le Cygne

    Outlander II: Sing me a Song...

    Sure is! Here's more on the locations: Showrunner Ron Moore reveals that the producers did initially investigate shooting the new season in the United States as many other TV shows do, but ultimately decided against it. “We looked into it, and it just didn't make sense to us for a lot of reasons, both financial and also we have this enormous infrastructure and this amazing team of artisans and craftspeople and crew in Scotland, and ultimately we just didn't really want to let go of and start all over again," Moore says. “So we will shoot Scotland for America. We will also travel to eastern Europe to do some exterior work to sort of sell the mountains of North Carolina the rivers and things like that.” https://mashable.com/2017/12/10/outlander-season-4-america-spoilers-season-3-finale-recap/
  4. Le Cygne

    Outlander II: Sing me a Song...

    Cool, you started a thread! They will keep filming in Scotland.
  5. Le Cygne

    U.S. Politics: The Flood Shall Wash Away The Cobbs

    Perfect! It's all playing out before our eyes.
  6. Le Cygne

    U.S. Politics: The Flood Shall Wash Away The Cobbs

    He sure did. It's shocking even today. Wow.
  7. Le Cygne

    BIRDS (and how to look at them)

    Fabulous! I wonder sometimes if birds know how fabulous they are and how much joy they bring us. I hope so!
  8. A good quote from Jamaica Inn, by Daphne du Maurier, about that push and pull that is typical of the romances in this series. "Falling in love was a pretty name for it, that was all. Jem Merlyn was a man, and she was a woman, and whether it was his hands or his skin or his smile she did not know, but something inside her responded to him, and the very thought of him was an irritant and a stimulant at the same time. It nagged at her and would not let her be."
  9. I added those! Kept finding more.
  10. Glad you liked it! For the purposes of this thread, the term "romance" is used in terms of the overall story. With romance as a genre, the story often begins when the characters are younger, to show character development that leads to the eventual romantic conclusion. The seeds are planted, then grow, it's all part of the "romance" as a story. Adding this video I found, just to show an example from another story, starting the story when they are young to set up the connection, like with George and Mary in It's A Wonderful Life:
  11. Ah, that's beautifully said, and very true. She gets to decide, and that's what makes it so special.
  12. Oh, that's a good one! There's also a name Geillis as a "seer of the future" uses, Melisande! And lots more, like Jamie saying to Claire, like Sandor says to Sansa, whether you will it or no, which is about strong feelings on an instinctual level, something deep and true. I like that DG says Marsali's strength is her own inner feelings, and knowing what she wants. That's something no one can ever take from her, not even a cruel world, that strength that comes from within.
  13. He's got some nice Jane Eyre ones going on, too. Right down to the wording, I'll add that later.
  14. Nice points, and a great find of the cedar hope chest mention in GRRM's other story! These were commonly used by young women to prepare for married life. I found some ads here and here. Love stories are about hope, and this one is beautifully so. Found a nice quote from Diana Gabaldon in Voyager, Marsali reminds me of Sansa. She wants to marry the man she loves, Fergus, who, like Sandor, has only his heart to offer, and he's older, too (Marsali is 15, Fergus is 30), but she knows what she wants: So she had done it. One fifteen-year-old girl, with nothing but stubbornness as a weapon. “I want him,” she had said. And kept saying it, through her mother’s objections and Jamie’s arguments, through Fergus’s scruples and her own fears, through three thousand miles of homesickness, hardship, ocean storm, and shipwreck. She raised her face, shining, and found her mirror in Fergus’s eyes. I saw them look at each other, and felt the tears prickle behind my lids. “I want him.”
  15. Great points! And this is what it comes down to, she wants to make her own choices! (I put my comment above.)
  16. Sandor showed love for Sansa from the start, I think the turning point in their story is that Sansa shows her love for Sandor. Now it's her turn to show her love for him, and I think she will in a big way, it's the next beat of the Beauty and the Beast story. In Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Darcy showed his love for Elizabeth Bennet by looking out for her sister, and she was very moved by that. I think we will see a similar scene in this series, Sandor showed his love for Sansa by looking out for her sister.
  17. Extra -- Sansa and Sandor ~ Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester (Charlotte Bronte) Parallels -- A little bird: Jane/Mr. R: "I see at intervals the glance of a curious sort of bird through the close-set bars of a cage: a vivid, restless, resolute captive is there; were it but free, it would soar cloud-high." ... "Gentle, soft dream, nestling in my arms now, you will fly, too, as your sisters have all fled before you: but kiss me before you go - embrace me, Jane." Sansa/Sandor: "You're like one of those birds from the Summer Isles, aren't you? A pretty little talking bird, repeating all the pretty little words they taught you to recite." ... "You promised me a song, little bird. Have you forgotten?" ... "The little bird flew away, did she? Well bloody good for her." A beast: Jane/Mr. R: "Am I hideous, Jane?" "Very, sir: you always were, you know." "Have you a pocket-comb about you, sir?" "What for, Jane?" "Just to comb out this shaggy black mane. I find you rather alarming, when I examine you close at hand: you talk of my being a fairy, but I am sure, you are more like a brownie." Sansa/Sandor: "Look at me. Look at me!" Sandor Clegane put a huge hand under her chin and forced her face up. He squatted in front of her, and moved the torch close. "There's a pretty for you. Take a good long stare. You know you want to." ... She found his massive shoulder with her hand. "He was no true knight," she whispered to him. The Hound threw back his head and roared. He gives her his cloak: Jane/Mr. R: "Not at all: just be still. You have a shawl on. If you are not warm enough, you may take my cloak yonder; wrap it about you, and sit down in the arm-chair: there, -- I will put it on." ... "Rain and wind, indeed! Yes, you are dripping like a mermaid; pull my cloak round you." Sansa/Sandor: Sandor Clegane unfastened his cloak and tossed it at her. Sansa clutched it against her chest, fists bunched hard in the white wool. The coarse weave was scratchy against her skin, but no velvet had ever felt so fine. ... She found his cloak on the floor, twisted up tight, the white wool stained by blood and fire... She shook out the torn cloak and huddled beneath it on the floor, shivering. She compares him to other men, and prefers his beastliness: Jane/Mr. R: I compared him with Mr. Rochester. I think (with deference be it spoken) the contrast could not be much greater between a sleek gander and a fierce falcon: between a meek sheep and the rough-coated keen-eyed dog, its guardian. Sansa/Sandor: I wish the Hound were here... When the appointed night arrived, another of the Kingsguard came for her, a man as different from Sandor Clegane... as... well, as a flower from a dog. ... and his ferocity: Jane/Mr. R: And, reader, do you think I feared him in his blind ferocity? -- if you do, you little know me. Sansa/Sandor: And yet, some part of her wished that Ser Dontos had a little of the Hound's ferocity. Harsh as he was: Jane/Mr. R: And was Mr. Rochester now ugly in my eyes? No, reader: gratitude, and many associations, all pleasurable and genial, made his face the object I best liked to see... I believed that his moodiness, his harshness, and his former faults of morality (I say former, for now he seemed corrected of them) had their source in some cruel cross of fate. Sansa/Sandor: I would be gladder if it were the Hound, Sansa thought. Harsh as he was, she did not believe Sandor Clegane would let any harm come to her. ... I wish the Hound were here... But Sansa understood. She knew the secret of his burned face. He laid a heavy hand on her shoulder: Jane/Mr. R: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse. Sansa/Sandor: The Hound laid a heavy hand on her shoulder. ... From the way he moved, it was plain to see that he was lame. Innocence and experience: Jane/Mr. R (he's 20 years older than her): "Then, in the first place, do you agree with me that I have a right to be a little masterful, abrupt, perhaps exacting, sometimes, on the grounds I stated, namely, that I am old enough to be your father, and that I have battled through a varied experience with many men of many nations, and roamed over half the globe, while you have lived quietly with one set of people in one house?"..."I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience."... "Mr. Rochester was about forty, and this governess not twenty; and you see, when gentlemen of his age fall in love with girls, they are often like as if they were bewitched. Well, he would marry her." Sansa/Sandor (he's 15 years older than her): "You look almost a woman... face, teats, and you're taller too, almost... ah, you're still a stupid little bird, aren't you? Singing all the songs they taught you... sing me a song, why don't you? Go on. Sing to me. Some song about knights and fair maids. You like knights, don't you?... Do you like wine, little bird? True wine? A flagon of sour red, dark as blood, all a man needs. Or a woman." ... As they were winding their way up the steps, she said, "Why do you let people call you a dog? You won't let anyone call you a knight." A climb and a view from the roof: Jane/Mr. R: Anybody may blame me who likes, when I add further, that, now and then, when I took a walk by myself in the grounds; when I went down to the gates and looked through them along the road; or when, while Adèle played with her nurse, and Mrs. Fairfax made jellies in the storeroom, I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line -- that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen -- that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach. Sansa/Sandor: Sansa could go where she would so long as she did not try to leave the castle, but there was nowhere she wanted to go. She crossed over the dry moat with its cruel iron spikes and made her way up the narrow turnpike stair, but when she reached the door of her bedchamber she could not bear to enter. The very walls of the room made her feel trapped; even with the window opened wide it felt as though there were no air to breathe. Turning back to the stair, Sansa climbed. The smoke blotted out the stars and the thin crescent of moon, so the roof was dark and thick with shadows. Yet from here she could see everything: the Red Keep's tall towers and great cornerforts, the maze of city streets beyond, to south and west the river running black, the bay to the east, the columns of smoke and cinders, and fires, fires everywhere. A black horse (and a black dog): Jane/Mr. R: Mr. Rochester's black horse: Mesrour, named for the Arabian Nights executioner (and he has a black dog, Pilot): I heard a rush under the hedge, and close down by the hazel stems glided a great dog, whose black and white colour made him a distinct object against the trees... I put down my muff on the stile, and went up to the tall steed; I endeavoured to catch the bridle, but it was a spirited thing, and would not let me come near its head; I made effort on effort, though in vain: meantime, I was mortally afraid of its trampling fore-feet. The traveller waited and watched for some time, and at last he laughed. Sansa/Sandor: Sandor's black horse: Stranger, named for the death aspect of the Seven: Stranger, the Hound called him. Arya had tried to steal him once, when Clegane was taking a piss against a tree, thinking she could ride off before he could catch her. Stranger had almost bitten her face off. He was gentle as an old gelding with his master, but otherwise he had a temper as black as he was. She had never known a horse so quick to bite or kick. Look at me: Jane/Mr. R: I both wished and feared to see Mr. Rochester on the day which followed this sleepless night: I wanted to hear his voice again, yet feared to meet his eye. ... "Tell me now, fairy as you are - can’t you give me a charm, or a philter, or something of that sort, to make me a handsome man?" "It would be past the power of magic, sir;" and, in thought, I added, "A loving eye is all the charm needed: to such you are handsome enough; or rather your sternness has a power beyond beauty." Sansa/Sandor: "The little bird still can't bear to look at me, can she?" The Hound released her. "You were glad enough to see my face when the mob had you, though. Remember?" ... The Hound leapt at them, his sword a blur of steel that trailed a red mist as it swung. When they broke and ran before him he had laughed, his terrible burned face for a moment transformed. Kissed by fire: Jane/Mr. R: Tongues of flame darted round the bed: the curtains were on fire. In the midst of blaze and vapour, Mr. Rochester lay stretched motionless, in deep sleep... "It is a pity to see it; and a pity to see your eyes—and the scar of fire on your forehead: and the worst of it is, one is in danger of loving you too well for all this; and making too much of you." Sansa/Sandor: But Sansa understood. She knew the secret of his burned face. It was only the fire he feared. That night, the wildfire had set the river itself ablaze, and filled the very air with green flame. Even in the castle, Sansa had been afraid. Outside... she could scarcely imagine it. A caress, and manly tears: Jane/Mr. R: I caressed, in order to soothe him. I knew of what he was thinking, and wanted to speak for him, but dared not. As he turned aside his face a minute, I saw a tear slide from under the sealed eyelid, and trickle down the manly cheek. My heart swelled. Sansa/Sandor: Some instinct made her lift her hand and cup his cheek with her fingers. The room was too dark for her to see him, but she could feel the stickiness of the blood, and a wetness that was not blood. "Little bird," he said once more, his voice raw and harsh as steel on stone. A sexually charged parting: Jane/Mr. R: Suddenly he turned away, with an inarticulate exclamation, full of passionate emotion of some kind; he walked fast through the room and came back; he stooped towards me as if to kiss me; but I remembered caresses were now forbidden. I turned my face away and put his aside... “Jane! will you hear reason?” (he stooped and approached his lips to my ear); “because, if you won’t, I’ll try violence.” His voice was hoarse; his look that of a man who is just about to burst an insufferable bond and plunge headlong into wild license. I saw that in another moment, and with one impetus of frenzy more, I should be able to do nothing with him. The present—the passing second of time—was all I had in which to control and restrain him—a movement of repulsion, flight, fear would have sealed my doom,—and his. But I was not afraid: not in the least. I felt an inward power; a sense of influence, which supported me. The crisis was perilous; but not without its charm: such as the Indian, perhaps, feels when he slips over the rapid in his canoe. I took hold of his clenched hand, loosened the contorted fingers, and said to him, soothingly— “Sit down; I’ll talk to you as long as you like, and hear all you have to say, whether reasonable or unreasonable.” Sansa/Sandor: "I could keep you safe," he rasped. "They're all afraid of me. No one would hurt you again, or I'd kill them." He yanked her closer, and for a moment she thought he meant to kiss her. He was too strong to fight. She closed her eyes, wanting it to be over, but nothing happened. "Still can't bear to look, can you?" she heard him say. He gave her arm a hard wrench, pulling her around and shoving her down onto the bed. "I'll have that song. Florian and Jonquil, you said." His dagger was out, poised at her throat. "Sing, little bird. Sing for your little life." ... Some instinct made her lift her hand and cup his cheek with her fingers. The room was too dark for her to see him, but she could feel the stickiness of the blood, and a wetness that was not blood. "Little bird," he said once more, his voice raw and harsh as steel on stone. Then he rose from the bed... When she crawled out of bed, long moments later, she was alone. She found his cloak on the floor, twisted up tight, the white wool stained by blood and fire... She shook out the torn cloak and huddled beneath it... Dreams of him: Jane/Mr. R: At this period of my life, my heart far oftener swelled with thankfulness than sank with dejection: and yet, reader, to tell you all, in the midst of this calm, this useful existence - after a day passed in honourable exertion amongst my scholars, an evening spent in drawing or reading contentedly alone - I used to rush into strange dreams at night: dreams many-coloured, agitated, full of the ideal, the stirring, the stormy - dreams where, amidst unusual scenes, charged with adventure, with agitating risk and romantic chance, I still again and again met Mr. Rochester, always at some exciting crisis; and then the sense of being in his arms, hearing his voice, meeting his eye, touching his hand and cheek, loving him, being loved by him - the hope of passing a lifetime at his side, would be renewed, with all its first force and fire. Then I awoke. Then I recalled where I was, and how situated. Then I rose up on my curtainless bed, trembling and quivering; and then the still, dark night witnessed the convulsion of despair, and heard the burst of passion. Sansa/Sandor: That night Sansa scarcely slept at all, but tossed and turned just as she had aboard the Merling King... And she dreamed of her wedding night too, of Tyrion’s eyes devouring her as she undressed. Only then he was bigger than Tyrion had any right to be, and when he climbed into the bed his face was scarred only on one side. “I'll have a song from you,” he rasped, and Sansa woke and found the old blind dog beside her once again. "I wish that you were Lady," she said. ... As the boy's lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt, when his cruel mouth pressed down on her own. He had come to Sansa in the darkness as green fire filled the sky. He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak. Missing her: Jane/Mr. R: "Who can tell what a dark, dreary, hopeless life I have dragged on for months past? Doing nothing, expecting nothing; merging night in day; feeling but the sensation of cold when I let the fire go out, of hunger when I forgot to eat: and then a ceaseless sorrow, and, at times, a very delirium of desire to behold my Jane again." Sansa/Sandor: The Hound no longer troubled to hide his face. He no longer seemed to care who knew him. ... His eyes opened. "You remember where the heart is?" he asked in a hoarse whisper.... He made a queer sound, and it took her a moment to realize he was sobbing. "And the little bird, your pretty sister..." A quiet island: Jane/Mr. R: "My little friend!" said he, "I wish I were in a quiet island with only you; and trouble, and danger, and hideous recollections removed from me." Sansa/Sandor: "Why do they call it the Quiet Isle?" asked Podrick. "Those who dwell here are penitents, who seek to atone for their sins through contemplation, prayer, and silence." ... On the upper slopes they saw three boys driving sheep, and higher still they passed a lichyard where a brother bigger than Brienne was struggling to dig a grave. An elder brother: Jane/Mr. R: "He lost his elder brother a few years since." "His elder brother?" "Yes. The present Mr. Rochester has not been very long in possession of the property; only about nine years." "Nine years is a tolerable time. Was he so very fond of his brother as to be still inconsolable for his loss?" "Why, no—perhaps not. I believe there were some misunderstandings between them." Sansa/Sandor: "A woodcarver set up shop in the village under my father’s keep, and to buy favor he sent us gifts. The old man made marvelous toys. I don’t remember what I got, but it was Gregor’s gift I wanted. A wooden knight..." ... "He is at rest." The Elder Brother paused. "You are young, child. I have counted four-and-forty name days … which makes me more than twice your age, I think." An irreligious dog: Jane/Mr. R: "Jane! you think me, I daresay, an irreligious dog: but my heart swells with gratitude to the beneficent God of this earth just now." Sansa/Sandor: The gravedigger lowered his head. When Dog went to sniff him he dropped his spade and scratched his ear. ... "Wolves are nobler than that... And so are dogs, I think." No ruin, but a safe prop for new life: Jane/Mr. R: "I am no better than the old lightning-struck chestnut-tree in Thornfield orchard," he remarked ere long. "And what right would that ruin have to bid a budding woodbine cover its decay with freshness?" "You are no ruin, sir—no lightning-struck tree: you are green and vigorous. Plants will grow about your roots, whether you ask them or not, because they take delight in your bountiful shadow; and as they grow they will lean towards you, and wind round you, because your strength offers them so safe a prop." Sansa/Sandor: On the upper slopes they saw three boys driving sheep, and higher still they passed a lichyard where a brother bigger than Brienne was struggling to dig a grave. From the way he moved, it was plain to see that he was lame... When Dog went to sniff him he dropped his spade and scratched his ear. I heard a voice... Where are you?: Jane/Mr. R: The craving to know what had become of him followed me everywhere... I sought my bedroom each night to brood over it. ... I saw nothing, but I heard a voice somewhere cry - "Jane! Jane! Jane!" - nothing more.. And it was the voice of a human being - a known, loved, well-remembered voice - that of Edward Fairfax Rochester; and it spoke in pain and woe, wildly, eerily, urgently. "I am coming!" I cried. "Wait for me! Oh, I will come!"... "Where are you?" I exclaimed. Sansa/Sandor: A dog can smell a lie, you know, the Hound had told her once. She could almost hear the rough rasp of his voice. Look around you, and take a good whiff. They're all liars here, and every one better than you. She wondered what had become of Sandor Clegane. ... "Singer," a rough voice said, "best go, if you want to sing again." The light was dim, but she saw a faint glimmer of a blade... It was Lothor Brune's voice, she realized. Not the Hound's, no, how could it be? Of course it had to be Lothor. An heiress staying with cousins under an alias: Jane/Mr. R: "My name is Jane Elliott." Sansa/Sandor: "Alayne... Stone, would it be?" An unwanted suitor who wants another woman: Jane/Mr. R: St. John: "fair, blue eyes, a Grecian profile" Sansa/Sandor: Harry: "sandy blond hair, pale blue eyes, an aquiline nose" She wants to marry for love: Jane/Mr. R: "Marry! I don't want to marry, and never shall marry... No one would take me for love; and I will not be regarded in the light of a mere money speculation." Sansa/Sandor: She did not want to wed again, not now, perhaps not ever. ... It is not me she wants her son to marry, it is my claim. No one will ever marry me for love.
  18. Sansa and the Hound ~ Beauty and the Beast -- "For in that solemn silence is heard in the whisper of every sleeping thing: Look, look at me, come wake me up, for still here I'll be." ~ Beauty and the Beast (2017) Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bete) is a coming of age story, a story of sexual awakening (the Beast awakens the beast within Beauty) and marriage. Beauty and the Beast bring out the best in each other. Jean Cocteau's La Belle et la Bete (the inspiration for Sansa and the Hound): The story the author wrote parallels Cocteau's La Belle et la Bete Calendar art the author requested, Sansa and the Hound as La Belle et la Bete A review of Jean Cocteau's La Belle et la Bete by Roger Ebert: Those familiar with the 1991 cartoon will recognize some of the elements of the story, but certainly not the tone. Cocteau uses haunting images and bold Freudian symbols to suggest that emotions are at a boil in the subconscious of his characters. Consider the extraordinary shot where Belle waits at the dining table in the castle for the Beast's first entrance. He appears behind her and approaches silently. She senses his presence, and begins to react in a way that some viewers have described as fright, although it is clearly orgasmic. Before she has even seen him, she is aroused to her very depths, and a few seconds later, as she tells him she cannot marry--a Beast!--she toys with a knife that is more than a knife. The Hound says the Beast's lines: La Belle et la Bete (Beauty and the Beast): One does not call me "my Lord"; one calls me "Beast." I don't like compliments. Sansa and the Hound: "Spare me your empty little compliments, girl … and your ser's. I am no knight.... And I'm no lord..." "Why do you let people call you a dog? You won't let anyone call you a knight." "I like dogs better than knights." Beauty and the Beast symbolism at the tourney: The tourney in Sansa's story is loaded with Beauty and the Beast symbolism Beauty is Sansa (she's often described as beautiful; a flowering maiden, she's drawn to the Beast, but afraid to take the leap from father to Beast) The Beast is the Hound (he's often described in beastly terms; he's no lord, and he doesn't like empty compliments, but he likes Beauty) Father is Ned (Beauty wants to leave the nest, and Father leads her away from home, then leaves her with the Beast, where the tale plays out) False Father is Littlefinger (he tries to take Beauty's father's place, but he's false, and leads her astray, like her sisters did in the fairytale) The Prince is Joffrey (Beauty calls him my prince; he's beautiful, but deep down inside, she prefers the beastly Beast) The Rose is Loras, the Knight of Flowers (the rose plays its part, and leads Beauty to the Beast, then is cast aside) False Rose is Tyrion, the Knight of Flowers in the Dark (he makes this pitch to Beauty, but she casts him aside, too) The Beast (the Hound) is the champion at the tourney for Beauty's Father (Ned) Beauty (Sansa) tells her Father (Ned) she knows the Beast (the Hound) will win Beauty (Sansa) remembers the Beast (the Hound) was the champion at her Father's tourney The Beast (the Hound) defeats all of Beauty's potential suitors (representing Baratheon, Lannister, and Tyrell) at the tourney The Rose (Loras) yields to the Beast (the Hound); the Rose (Loras) cheats at the tourney, the Beast (the Hound) is the true knight and wins The Beast (the Hound) says the Beast's lines (above) after the Prince (Joffrey) tells him to take Beauty (Sansa) to the castle False Father (Littlefinger) bets against the Beast (the Hound) and loses; he notes False Rose (Tyrion) would have bet against the Beast (The Hound) and lost, too Beauty (Sansa) misses the Beast (the Hound) (she wishes he was there, pretends they kissed, dreams of him in the marriage bed), while the Beast (the Hound) nearly dies of heartbreak remembering Beauty (Sansa) ("That's where the heart is, girl. That's how you kill a man."... "You remember where the heart is?") The Rose (Loras) and False Rose (Tyrion) always yield to the Beast (the Hound) in Beauty's (Sansa's) thoughts and dreams (the Beast/the Hound always wins, as he did at the tourney) For example, Beauty (Sansa) considers kissing the Rose (Loras), but she gives the kiss to the Beast (the Hound) For example, Beauty (Sansa) dreams of the False Rose (Tyrion) in bed with her, but she replaces him with the Beast (the Hound) This goes on throughout all the books, from first to last Beauty misses the Beast (the Hound) (she wishes he was there, pretends they kissed, dreams of him in the marriage bed), while the Beast (the Hound) nearly dies of heartbreak remembering Beauty (Sansa) ("That's where the heart is, girl. That's how you kill a man."... "You remember where the heart is?") Quotes from the tourney: "Spare me your empty little compliments, girl … and your ser's. I am no knight... She found his massive shoulder with her hand. "He was no true knight," she whispered to him. The Hound threw back his head and roared... Sansa said, “I knew the Hound would win.”... “Is the Hound the champion now?” Sansa asked Ned. “No,” he told her. “There will be one final joust, between the Hound and the Knight of Flowers.” But Sansa had the right of it after all. A few moments later Ser Loras Tyrell walked back onto the field in a simple linen doublet and said to Sandor Clegane, “I owe you my life. The day is yours, ser.” “I am no ser,” the Hound replied, but he took the victory, and the champion’s purse, and, for perhaps the first time in his life, the love of the commons. They cheered him as he left the lists to return to his pavilion... He had been the champion in her father's tourney, Sansa remembered. Beauty and the Beast, Visions and Revisions of an Old Tale by Betsy Hearne: The Beast assumes a passive role and Beauty an active one. The Beast basically sits around waiting to be rescued by the handsome princess, as soon as she loosens her ties with home and family, especially her father... The Beast, who is first seen as repulsive, is in the end seen before any transformation, as irresistible. He is an ostensible villain who turns out to be vulnerable and even heroic in beastly form... The Beast's task is patience; Beauty's is perception. Beauty, first seen as infinitely desirable, finds herself desiring, and this most loyal daughter turns out to be a promise-breaker, acting in a beastly manner toward a true friend. Before her final choice, one is attracted to the Beast and impatient with Beauty... Beauty must learn to believe not what she sees, but what she feels… On Cocteau’s version: Beauty’s revelation at the end - "I was the monster, my Beast" - climaxes the many reversals explored in both picture and dialogue... “Beauty and the Beast” offers the promise that for all our human ugliness and brutality, we can be acceptable, even lovable, to another human being. The continuing relevance of “Beauty and the Beast” as a modern theme stems from this fearful knowledge that we are each beastly, juxtaposed with the hopeful knowledge that we are each beautiful. While Beauty and the Beast are apart: Beauty's story --- "As the boy's lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt, when his cruel mouth pressed down on her own. He had come to Sansa in the darkness as green fire filled the sky. He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak." ~ Sansa on Sandor, AFFC Sansa "remembers" kissing Sandor three times She tells us she's been thinking about Sandor while lying awake at night in bed, and she wishes he was there, and she regrets not going with him, and she puts his bloody cloak (red on white, traditional marriage consummation symbolism) with her summer silks The cloak she clutches to her bare breasts and tells us no velvet felt so fine, the cloak she chooses to get under in a scene filled with sexual symbolism (that's twice Sansa has put Sandor's cloak on herself, a hint there will be a third time) After dreaming a thousand times of a tall strong man kissing her when she marries him, she keeps the cloak of a tall strong man who she pretends she kissed in a cedar chest, commonly used as a "hope chest" where young women preparing for marriage keep treasures She tells us she understands Sandor because she knows his secret, she wonders where he is, she dreams of him in bed with her, asking for a song, a song she says she'll sing for him gladly one day, a song he remembers with his dying breath When the other girls are pretending to kiss a man, she "one ups" them in her thoughts, what would the other girls think of her "kissing the Hound, as she had"? She models herself as a bastard (Alayne Stone) on Mya Stone, and when she hears older men make the best husbands, plays matchmaker for Mya and Lothor, at the same time she's matching herself with Sandor (note, even the spelling of Lothor and Sandor is similar) She is so focused on Sandor as her protector, she thinks she hears him coming to her rescue: "Singer," a rough voice said, "best go, if you want to sing again." The light was dim, but she saw a faint glimmer of a blade... It was Lothor Brune's voice, she realized. Not the Hound's, no, how could it be? Of course it had to be Lothor. When she pretends to kiss Sandor instead of Sweetrobin, this is not the first time she uses Sweetrobin as a kissing stand-in for Sandor (he says let's stay in bed and read stories and kiss) She has thought of Sandor this way so often, she doesn't even have to name him anymore, and we know who he is She refers to him as "he" (she doesn't name him in her dream of him in her marriage bed, or later when she pretends she's "kissing" him, for example) "She found herself" - Sandor's kiss helps her find Sansa "He had come to Sansa" - this is what she wants to happen again "He left me" with nothing but his cloak, like a jilted bride; a little while later, when she's asked about the marriage bed, she remembers the Hound, and how he'd kissed her She says "he left me" and he says he left her, too; they both regret that he left her "She could still remember how it felt" - she has imagined this so many times, it seems real Later, she rescues Sweetrobin, like Sandor rescued her Before, Sandor said: "Look at me," and she closed her eyes Now, she says: I could close my eyes. The mule knows the way, he has no need of me. But that seemed more something Sansa would have done, that frightened girl. Alayne was an older woman, and bastard brave. Before, Sandor was always there to catch her before she could fall: She could still feel the cruel pinch of fingers on her wrist as she lost her balance and began to fall. When his hand fell away, another hand, stronger, shoved her back into her saddle. Now, she doesn't fall: The steepness of this part of the descent made her cling tightly to her saddle. I will not fall. She looks now, and she stays on the saddle, like Sandor helped her do before; she's a woman now, and she's not afraid to look Beauty is ready for the Beast, but where is he? The Beast's Story --- The Beast proves his love by taking care of Beauty's sister The song about stealing a sweet kiss with a blade from the maid from Gulltown is sung just as Sandor, who nearly stole a sweet kiss from a maid "from Gulltown", re-enters the story Sandor remembers Sansa's song: "You ought to sing me a pretty little song, the way your sister did" Before, he said "I'm no lord" but now, he's ready to bend, in order to reconnect with Sansa: "If this Young Wolf has the wits the gods gave a toad, he'll make me a lordling and beg me to enter his service. He needs me, though he may not know it yet" (the subtext is Sansa needs him) He hears Sansa was forced to marry someone else, and has to sit, drinks too much too fast, then nearly loses the fight Now it's Sandor who can't stay in the saddle, it's time to rest: He slumped in the saddle, and sweated, and his ear began to bleed through the bandage. He needed all his strength just to keep from falling off Stranger... “I need to rest,” was all he said. This time when he dismounted he did fall. Before he said: "That's where the heart is, girl. That's how you kill a man." and now the Hound, the Beast, asks again, "You remember where the heart is?" as he nearly dies from heartbreak on the Trident, remembering Beauty (Sansa) He made a queer sound, and it took her a moment to realize he was sobbing. “And the little bird, your pretty sister, I stood there in my white cloak and let them beat her. I took the bloody song, she never gave it. I meant to take her too. I should have. I should have fucked her bloody and ripped her heart out before leaving her for that dwarf.” His heart breaks for Sansa, as he imagines what she has gone through He mentions his cloak again, he pledged to protect her, but feels he let her down, while at the same time, she's remembering how much he did for her He wishes she had given him her heart and her desires (her song), while at the same time, she's giving him her kiss and remembers giving him her song He says "I left her" just as she says "he left me" - they both regret that he left her Beauty and the Beast, their story together and in the future --- As Sansa makes the transition from father to Beast, from daughter to lover, there are many juxtapositions of Sansa's real father, Ned, and Sandor; for example: "Strong hands grasped her by the shoulders, and for a moment Sansa thought it was her father, but when she turned, it was the burned face of Sandor Clegane looking down at her" Cocteau has Beauty refuse Avenant's offer of marriage in the beginning, but in the end, Beauty accepts the same man (in appearance) that she rejected before This symbolically reflects Beauty's transition as she overcomes her fears about sex, played out with her exchanges with the Beast, who brings out the beast (sexuality) in her It’s when Sansa is ready to take that leap from father to Beast, when she faces her fears about sex, that Sandor, in turn, relinquishes the last vestiges of the Hound persona, represented by the abandonment of his helm At the same time Sandor nearly dies on the Trident, Sansa is ready to look at him Both Sansa and Sandor are idealists; as children, he played with the knight toy no doubt rescuing a fair maiden, and she loved songs of knights and fair maidens; and at times it seems there is no place for them in the world, but they give each other hope Sansa and Sandor, like Beauty and the Beast, see the good in each other and draw that out, they bring out the best in each other, and are better together And so Beauty and the Beast find their way back to each other In Cocteau's version, in the end, Beauty calls the Beast "my Beast" and upon his transformation, Marlene Dietrich said with dismay, "Where is my beautiful Beast?" The subtext of fear is sexual excitement; in the end, Cocteau has Beauty say "I like being afraid with you" as they are about to "fly away" together (the subtext is sexual) A song and a kiss: Sansa remembers Sandor kissing her three times: The first time: Sansa is boasting to herself about kissing Sandor when the other girls play a kissing game: Sansa wondered what Megga would think about kissing the Hound as she had The second time: Sansa is playing a kissing game with Sweetrobin, enjoying the thought of Sandor's kiss and missing him: She could still remember how it felt with his cruel mouth pressed down on her own... He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak. The third time: Sansa places Sandor in her marriage bed: "You do know what goes on in a marriage bed, I hope?" She thought of... the Hound and how he'd kissed her, and gave a nod. A song and a kiss, throughout their story: "Sing me a song, why don't you? Go on. Sing to me. Some song about knights and fair maids. You like knights, don't you?" “I … I know a song about Florian and Jonquil.” “Florian and Jonquil? A fool and his cunt. Spare me. But one day I’ll have a song from you, whether you will it or no.” “I will sing it for you gladly.” He yanked her closer, and for a moment she thought he meant to kiss her. "I'll have that song. Florian and Jonquil, you said... Sing, little bird." Then she remembered: she had prayed to the mother to "save" Sandor, and now, when he comes to her from a ship called Prayer, she sings for the Mother to "save" him "Little bird," he said once more. "Off to Gulltown to see the fair maid, heigh-ho, heigh-ho. I'll steal a sweet kiss with the point of my blade, heigh-ho, heigh-ho. I'll make her my love and we'll rest in the shade, heigh-ho, heigh-ho." "And she sang for me. You didn't know that, did you? Your sister sang me a sweet little song." "I took the bloody song, she never gave it." As the boy's lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt... He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak. Sansa remembers Sandor when it's time to kiss her husband in a marriage ceremony: He is even uglier than the Hound. She dreams of Sandor in the marriage bed as her husband: When he climbed into the bed his face was scarred only on one side. "I'll have a song from you," he rasped. And again: "You do know what goes on in a marriage bed, I hope?" She thought of... the Hound and how he'd kissed her, and gave a nod. Before the story is over, "she'll be singing to the Stranger, begging for his kiss." While she's pretending they kissed: Drifting snowflakes brushed her face as light as lover's kisses, and melted on her cheeks. Sandor is the only one who asks Sansa to sing; Littlefinger told her life is not a song and Tyrion said the last thing she needs is more songs Sansa misses Sandor ("I wish the Hound were here"), then The Bear and the Maiden Fair, a song where a maiden thinks she wants one thing (an idealized knight), but really wants another (sexual satisfaction), and finds that in a beast ("I called for a knight, but you're a bear!") is played at a luncheon about Sansa's marriage prospects Florian and Jonquil: The songs about Florian and Jonquil were her very favorites. Sansa is looking for three things, and she finds them all in Sandor: 1. Her True Knight: Help me, she prayed, send me a friend, a true knight to champion me. 2. Her Beast: Sansa found herself thinking of Lady again. She could smell out falsehood, she could. 3. Her Florian: Home, she thought, home, he is going to take me home, he'll keep me safe, my Florian. Then Sansa runs straight into Sandor: She was racing headlong down the serpentine steps when a man lurched out of a hidden doorway. Sansa caromed into him and lost her balance. Iron fingers caught her by the wrist before she could fall. And one by one, Sandor takes on each of the three things Sansa is looking for: 1. Her True Knight: "You like knights, don't you?... True knights..." 2. Her Beast: "A dog can smell a lie, you know." 3. Her Florian: "I never got my song... Florian and Jonquil?" Sansa and Sandor talk about true knights at her father's tourney: The silence went on and on, so long that she began to grow afraid for him now, not for herself. She found his massive shoulder with her hand. "He was no true knight," she whispered to him. Sansa, the fair maid, and Sandor, who becomes her knight, have ongoing exchanges about Florian and Jonquil: "Sing me a song, why don't you? Go on. Sing to me. Some song about knights and fair maids. You like knights, don't you?" “I … I know a song about Florian and Jonquil... I will sing it for you gladly.” When Sandor comes to Sansa before he leaves to rescue her, he asks her to sing Florian and Jonquil; now, things have changed between them, taking a romantic turn: He yanked her closer, and for a moment she thought he meant to kiss her... "I'll have that song. Florian and Jonquil, you said."... Some instinct made her lift her hand and cup his cheek with her fingers. Sandor and Dunk, a true knight, are paralleled in stories where they play Florian to their respective Jonquils, Sansa and Tanselle Dunk is the champion at the Ashford tourney, where he is a true knight to Tanselle, who plays Jonquil in a puppet show; Sandor is the champion at Sansa's father's tourney, where he is a true knight to Sansa, who becomes his Jonquil Dunk remembers the song about stealing a sweet kiss with a blade while digging a grave: The spring rains had softened the ground, so Dunk had no trouble digging the grave. He chose a spot on the western slope of a low hill... Only a few days past, he had been singing as they rode, the old song about going to Gulltown to see a fair maid, but instead of Gulltown he'd sung of Ashford. Off to Ashford to see the fair maid, heigh-ho, heigh-ho, Dunk thought miserably as he dug. Sandor digs a grave, while Sansa pretends they kissed, and pretends to be a maid from Gulltown, like in the song: On the upper slopes they saw three boys driving sheep, and higher still they passed a lichyard where a brother bigger than Brienne was struggling to dig a grave... "Off to Gulltown to see the fair maid, heigh-ho, heigh-ho..." Dunk steals a sweet kiss with a blade: With one hard yank he pulled her down on top of him and kissed her... But when they finally broke apart, he drew his dagger. "I know what I want to remember you by, m'lady." Sandor almost steals a sweet kiss with a blade (and Sansa pretends he did): He yanked her closer, and for a moment she thought he meant to kiss her... "I'll have that song. Florian and Jonquil, you said." His dagger was out, poised at her throat. More sexual symbolism: Sandor is at the center of Sansa's flowering (his "steel" even shows up at the end of her flowering dream) and sexual awakening (she dreams of him in the marriage bed, asking for a song) Blackwater is a symbolic wedding night, reminiscent of Sansa's dream of marriage to a tall, strong man who gives her his cloak of protection and kisses her Sandor pledges to protect her, declaring his love: "I could keep you safe. They're all afraid of me. No one would hurt you again, or I'd kill them" and gives her his cloak; later, Sansa adds the kiss Red on white is traditional virgin marriage consummation symbolism, and Sandor's bloody cloak represents the bloody white sheet; Sansa puts on Sandor's cloak herself, unlike the cloaks given to her by other men Sansa feels Sandor's dagger!dick pushing into her, then a wetness that is not blood, then a tear, and she caresses his face and gets under his bloody cloak (under "him"), and then bells ring across "her" "hills and hollows" (traditional sexual symbolism) There are many callbacks to Blackwater; what happens between Sansa and Sandor that night is described in sexual terms, then Sansa and Sandor repeatedly remember what happened between them that night in sexual terms The author clearly places a sexual emphasis on that night, on what happens between them, as the feelings simmering beneath the surface come to a boil, just as in Cocteau's version of Beauty and the Beast Sansa adds the kiss to that night, not to a new fantasy; she places importance on what happened between them that night, remembering what she was feeling that night, and imagining what he must have been feeling, too At the Fingers, in a callback to Blackwater, a hound is waiting in bed for Sansa, and the hound licks her face (dog kiss), then she ruffles his fur (caresses him), then she dreams of the Hound in her marriage bed The sexual symbolism of the Blackwater scene is reminiscent of other uses of symbolism throughout the books, notably the phallic symbolism of the dagger to "steal" a wildling woman, and a song about stealing a sweet kiss with a blade from a fair maid (from Gulltown); in other storylines, Dunk pulls a dagger on Rohanne, Jaime pulls a dagger on Brienne, Jon pulls a dagger on Ygritte, and more Sandor places his sword on Sansa, and she wants to "pet" him; He laid the edge of his longsword against her neck, just under her ear. Sansa could feel the sharpness of the steel.... He is a dog, just as he says. A half-wild, mean-tempered dog that bites any hand that tries to pet him, and yet will savage any man who tries to hurt his masters... She was afraid of Sandor Clegane... and yet, some part of her wished that Ser Dontos had a little of the Hound's ferocity. Sansa defends Sandor's "jousting": Of late Ser Osmund had taken Sandor Clegane’s place by Joffrey’s side, and Sansa had heard the women at the washing well saying he was as strong as the Hound, only younger and faster. If that was so, she wondered why she had never once heard of these Kettleblacks before Ser Osmund was named to the Kingsguard. Sandor is there when Sansa is "flowering": she has cramps and nearly falls, but he is there, with his "sword" just as he was during the rescue, that she remembers (his sword a blur of steel that trailed a red mist as it swung... "the little bird's bleeding... see to that cut") and dreams about (then she saw the bright glimmer of steel) Sandor's cloak (and marriage symbolism): Sandor's cloak has marital symbolism and Sansa (who has put his cloak on herself twice) keeps it in a cedar chest (used by young women to keep treasures for when they are married) with her summer silks (dresses), a sign of hope that winter will pass, and there will be time for happiness ("a better day") Other men force her to wear their cloaks (Tyrion, while "standing on the back of a fool" in the "mockery of a marriage" and Littlefinger, after he kidnaps her and without asking her), but Sansa puts on Sandor's cloak herself, twice, and remembers he gave it to her often Throughout the story Sansa observes Sandor's cloak, white like snow (Sandor's appearance is described in northern terms, he resembles Arya, and is not a knight like the men of the north are not knights), and bloody (classic wedding consummation symbolism) Sandor gives Sansa his cloak twice, with hints of a third time: The first time: Sansa clutched it against her chest, fists bunched hard in the white wool. The coarse weave was scratchy against her skin, but no velvet had ever felt so fine (the cloak is a stand-in for Sandor, coarse but feels fine) Sandor gives Sansa his cloak while protecting her (cloak of protection marriage symbolism), and she puts his cloak on herself (to contrast when she was forced to wear the cloak of someone she was forced to marry) The second time: She shook out the torn cloak and huddled beneath it on the floor, shivering. How long she stayed there she could not have said, but after a time she heard a bell ringing... calling across the hills and hollows Again, Sandor gives Sansa his cloak while protecting her; Sandor: "I could keep you safe.", Sansa: Sandor Clegane had come to her chambers to take her from the city In a scene filled with marriage and sexual symbolism, Sansa gets under Sandor's cloak (under Sandor), and bells start to ring, throughout (her) hills and hollows (traditional sexual symbolism) Hints of a possible third time: Sansa places Sandor's cloak with her own dresses in a cedar chest (traditionally hope chests, to prepare for marriage): She had his stained white cloak hidden in a cedar chest beneath her summer silks. Sansa often observes and remembers Sandor's cloak, throughout the story: Sandor Clegane was the first rider to appear. He wore an olive-green cloak over his soot-grey armor. That, and his hound's-head helm, were his only concession to ornament. The Hound’s scarred face was hard to read. He took a long moment to consider. "Why not? I have no lands nor wife to forsake, and who’d care if I did?" The burned side of his mouth twisted. "But I warn you, I’ll say no knight’s vows." In the back of the royal box, Sandor Clegane stood at guard, his hands resting on his swordbelt. The white cloak of the Kingsguard was draped over his broad shoulders and fastened with a jeweled brooch, the snowy cloth looking somehow unnatural against his brown roughspun tunic and studded leather jerkin. "Lady Sansa," the Hound announced curtly when he saw her. "Enough," she heard the Hound rasp... Boros shoved a meaty hand down the front of Sansa's bodice and gave a hard yank. The silk came tearing away, baring her to the waist. Sansa covered her breasts with her hands... Sandor Clegane unfastened his cloak and tossed it at her. Sansa clutched it against her chest, fists bunched hard in the white wool. The coarse weave was scratchy against her skin, but no velvet had ever felt so fine. Sandor Clegane cantered briskly through the gates astride Sansa’s chestnut courser. The girl was seated behind, both arms tight around the Hound’s chest... Clegane lifted her to the ground. His white cloak was torn and stained, and blood seeped through a jagged tear in his left sleeve. "The little bird's bleeding. Someone take her back to her cage and see to that cut." "I could keep you safe," he rasped. "They're all afraid of me. No one would hurt you again, or I'd kill them." He yanked her closer, and for a moment she thought he meant to kiss her... Some instinct made her lift her hand and cup his cheek with her fingers. The room was too dark for her to see him, but she could feel the stickiness of the blood, and a wetness that was not blood. "Little bird," he said once more, his voice raw and harsh as steel on stone. Then he rose from the bed. Sansa heard cloth ripping, followed by the softer sound of retreating footsteps. When she crawled out of bed, long moments later, she was alone. She found his cloak on the floor, twisted up tight, the white wool stained by blood and fire. The sky outside was darker by then, with only a few pale green ghosts dancing against the stars. A chill wind was blowing, banging the shutters. Sansa was cold. She shook out the torn cloak and huddled beneath it on the floor, shivering. I wish the Hound were here. The night of the battle, Sandor Clegane had come to her chambers to take her from the city, but Sansa had refused. Sometimes she lay awake at night, wondering if she'd been wise. She had his stained white cloak hidden in a cedar chest beneath her summer silks. She could not say why she'd kept it. The Hound had turned craven, she heard it said; at the height of the battle, he got so drunk the Imp had to take his men. But Sansa understood. She knew the secret of his burned face. It was only the fire he feared. That night, the wildfire had set the river itself ablaze, and filled the very air with green flame. Even in the castle, Sansa had been afraid. Outside . . . she could scarcely imagine it. She had dreamed of her wedding a thousand times, and always she had pictured how her betrothed would stand behind her tall and strong, sweep the cloak of his protection over her shoulders, and tenderly kiss her cheek as he leaned forward to fasten the clasp. He made a queer sound, and it took her a moment to realize he was sobbing. "And the little bird, your pretty sister, I stood there in my white cloak and let them beat her." As the boy's lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt, when his cruel mouth pressed down on her own. He had come to Sansa in the darkness as green fire filled the sky. He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak. Lady and the Hound: Sansa usually calls Sandor the Hound (the Beast); she often thinks of hounds and dogs, she makes "fast friends" and sleeps with a hound when she dreams of the Hound in bed with her asking for a song Sandor (The Hound) often appears when Sansa thinks of Lady, her lost wolf; the two are connected in this way throughout the story; Sandor takes Sansa's wolf's place to protect her, and brings out her inner beast Sansa insists on feeding Lady, who is called a dog, at the table: "I've never seen an aurochs," Sansa said, feeding a piece of bacon to Lady under the table... "A noble lady does not feed dogs at her table," she said... "She's not a dog, she's a direwolf," Sansa pointed out as Lady licked her fingers with a rough tongue. "Anyway, Father said we could keep them with us if we want." The Hound and Lady "compete" to protect Sansa: Strong hands grasped her by the shoulders, and for a moment Sansa thought it was her father, but when she turned, it was the burned face of Sandor Clegane looking down at her... Lady moved between them, rumbling a warning. Sandor does Lady's "between" move to protect Sansa when Lady is gone: Sandor Clegane knelt before her, between her and Joffrey. With a delicacy surprising in such a big man, he dabbed at the blood welling from her broken lip. Sansa thinks about the Hound protecting her, then Lady: Joffrey laughed. "He's my mother's dog, in truth. She has set him to guard me, and so he does." "You mean the Hound," she said... "Is it safe to leave him behind?" She found herself thinking of Lady, wishing the direwolf was with her.' Robert to Ned, just before Lady dies: "A direwolf is a savage beast. Sooner or later it would have turned on your girl the same way the other did on my son. Get her a dog, she'll be happier for it." Sandor protects Sansa: The girl speaks truly," the Hound rasped. "What a man sows on his name day, he reaps throughout the year." Again: The others obeyed without question … except for the Hound, but Joff never asked the Hound to punish her... "Enough," she heard the Hound rasp. And again: The Hound leapt at them, his sword a blur of steel that trailed a red mist as it swung. When they broke and ran before him he had laughed, his terrible burned face for a moment transformed. And when Sansa thinks about Lady: Sansa found herself thinking of Lady again. She could smell out falsehood, she could... She runs right into Sandor and he says: "A dog can smell a lie, you know." And Sandor protects her: "That one is nothing to fear, girl." The Hound laid a heavy hand on her shoulder. "Paint stripes on a toad, he does not become a tiger." Sansa asks why he lets people call him a dog: As they were winding their way up the steps, she said, "Why do you let people call you a dog? You won't let anyone call you a knight." "I like dogs better than knights." She wishes he was there to protect her when he's not there: Harsh as he was, she did not believe Sandor Clegane would let any harm come to her. And again, she thinks about Lady and there Sandor is: Sansa backed away from the window... "Lady," she whimpered softly, wondering if she would meet her wolf again when she was dead.... Then something stirred behind her, and a hand reached out of the dark and grabbed her wrist. Sansa sleeps with the hound she made friends with and she dreams of the Hound and then wishes the hound was Lady: And she dreamed of her wedding night too, of Tyrion's eyes devouring her as she undressed. Only then he was bigger than Tyrion had any right to be, and when he climbed into the bed his face was scarred only on one side. "I'll have a song from you," he rasped, and Sansa woke and found the old blind dog beside her once again. "I wish that you were Lady," she said. When Sansa is lonely, she misses hounds: There were no horses on the mountain, no hounds to bark and growl, no knights training in the yard. Dogs barking is associated with sex when Sansa has her dream of Sandor in her bed: Her last shriek was so loud that it set the dogs to barking... A dog can smell a lie, you know, the Hound had told her once. She could almost hear the rough rasp of his voice. And after Sansa pretends she kissed Sandor and thinks of him when asked what goes on in a marriage bed: I will dream a sweet dream, and when I wake there will be dogs barking, women gossiping beside the well, swords ringing in the yard. Little bird: Sandor calls Sansa little bird, a pet name, many times throughout the story Sandor often asks Sansa to sing and says she can fly; he catches her before she can fall, over and over, when she's not ready to fly yet. "Some septa trained you well. You're like one of those birds from the Summer Isles, aren't you? A pretty little talking bird, repeating all the pretty little words they taught you to recite." The Hound threw back his head and roared. Sansa stumbled back, away from him, but he caught her arm. "No," he growled at her, "no, little bird, he was no true knight." The Hound was right, she thought, I am only a little bird, repeating the words they taught me. Sansa caromed into him and lost her balance. Iron fingers caught her by the wrist before she could fall, and a deep voice rasped at her. "It's a long roll down the serpentine, little bird. Want to kill us both?" His laughter was rough as a saw on stone. "Maybe you do." (callback to when he saved her from killing herself along with Joffrey) "And what's Joff's little bird doing flying down the serpentine in the black of night?... You look almost a woman . . . face, teats, and you're taller too, almost . . . ah, you're still a stupid little bird, aren't you? Singing all the songs they taught you . . . sing me a song, why don't you? Go on. Sing to me. Some song about knights and fair maids. You like knights, don't you?" "Do you like wine, little bird? True wine? A flagon of sour red, dark as blood, all a man needs. Or a woman." He laughed, shook his head. "Drunk as a dog, damn me. You come now. Back to your cage, little bird. I'll take you there. Keep you safe for the king." The Hound gave her a push, oddly gentle, and followed her down the steps. "A hound will die for you, but never lie to you. And he'll look you straight in the face." He cupped her under the jaw, raising her chin, his fingers pinching her painfully. "And that's more than little birds can do, isn't it? I never got my song." The longer you keep him waiting, the worse it will go for you,” Sandor Clegane warned her... The Hound was always rough-tongued, but something in the way he had looked at her filled her with dread... The Hound snorted. "They trained you well, little bird." A stab went through her so sharp that Sansa sobbed and clutched her belly. She might have fallen, but a shadow moved suddenly, and strong fingers grabbed her arm and steadied her... "The little bird thinks she has wings, does she? Or do you mean to end up crippled like that brother of yours?" "The little bird still can't bear to look at me, can she?" The Hound released her. "You were glad enough to see my face when the mob had you, though. Remember?"... She could still feel the cruel pinch of fingers on her wrist as she lost her balance and began to fall. She’d thought she was going to die then, but the fingers had twitched, all five at once, and the man had shrieked loud as a horse. When his hand fell away, another hand, stronger, shoved her back into her saddle. Sandor wears his heart on his sleeve: Clegane lifted her to the ground. His white cloak was torn and stained, and blood seeped through a jagged tear in his left sleeve. "The little bird’s bleeding. Someone take her back to her cage and see to that cut." "Tell me, little bird, what kind of god makes a monster like the Imp, or a halfwit like Lady Tanda's daughter?... I'm honest. It's the world that's awful. Now fly away, little bird, I'm sick of you peeping at me." Sandor calls Sansa little bird six times when he comes to rescue her: "Little bird. I knew you'd come." ... . "Don't you want to ask who's winning the battle, little bird?" ... "The little bird repeats whatever she hears. Going, yes." ... "You promised me a song, little bird. Have you forgotten?" ... "Sing, little bird. Sing for your little life." And finally, before he leaves: Some instinct made her lift her hand and cup his cheek with her fingers. The room was too dark for her to see him, but she could feel the stickiness of the blood, and a wetness that was not blood. "Little bird," he said once more, his voice raw and harsh as steel on stone. Then he rose from the bed. Later, Sansa misses "hounds to bark and growl" and wishes she could fly away from the Eyrie: "Would that I had wings as well." She bonds with Sweetrobin over the story of a winged knight: "The Winged Knight could fly." When Sandor tries to bring Sansa's sister home: He must have seen something in her face then, for he leaned closer. "Sansa. That's it, isn't it? The wolf bitch wants to kill the pretty bird." When Sandor learns Sansa escaped the forced marriage: "The little bird flew away, did she? Well, bloody good for her. She shit on the Imp's head and flew off." And Sandor's dying thoughts are of Sansa, the little bird: He made a queer sound, and it took her a moment to realize he was sobbing. "And the little bird, your pretty sister, I stood there in my white cloak and let them beat her. I took the bloody song, she never gave it." Sansa compares Sandor positively to other men: Sansa often remembers what Sandor said and did, comparing him positively to other men; she replaces other men in her thoughts and dreams with Sandor Meryn (beats her) - later, she remembers what Sandor said Joffrey (torments her, gropes her breast) - later, she remembers what Sandor said Slynt (remembers what he did) - later, she remembers what Sandor said (hears his voice) Kingsguard (beats her) - later, she notes that Sandor never beat her; later, she remembers what Sandor said Rapists (attack her) - later, she remembers Sandor rescued her (repeatedly) Ilyn (after Cersei scares her about rape) - she wishes Sandor was there to protect her instead Tyrion (orders her to strip, gropes her breast) - she refuses to kneel for his cloak, but she clutches Sandor's cloak to her breasts and thinks no velvet felt so fine, and puts on Sandor's cloak herself, and keeps it, and thinks of it (and him) often; when she is forced to kiss Tyrion, she thinks of Sandor instead; later, she remembers what Sandor said (hears his voice), then dreams of Sandor in the marriage bed with her instead Marillion (gropes her breast) - she imagines Sandor is there to rescue her instead (once again, hears his voice) Littlefinger (forces kisses, also touches her breast, and tells her older men make the best husbands) - later, she pretends to kiss Sandor instead, and she places Sandor in the marriage bed because of how he'd kissed her instead Loras (forgets her) - the rose leads to the beast, she remembers Sandor was the champion at her father's tourney instead; when she fantasizes about a kiss, she thinks Loras never kissed her, but Sandor did, so she gives Sandor the kiss instead For Beauty, the Beast always wins (back to the tourney symbolism that's repeated throughout the story) Extra - GRRM Commentary: Sansa and Sandor: GEORGE R.R. MARTIN: And I do know there's all these people out there who are, as they call themselves, the SanSan fans, who want to see Sandor and Sansa get together at the end. So that's interesting, too. TOM MERRITT: The TV show has sort of played with that a little and probably stoked those fires, I would think. GEORGE R.R. MARTIN: Oh, sure. And I've played with it in the books. TOM MERRITT: Yeah, yeah. GEORGE R.R. MARTIN: There's something there. But it's still interesting to see how many people have responded to it. VERONICA BELMONT: I'm not going to say that that hasn't crossed my mind. Maybe I need to go join one of those fan sites and learn more. The Unkiss: "You will see, in A STORM OF SWORDS and later volumes [there's only been one so far], that Sansa remembers the Hound kissing her the night he came to her bedroom... but if you look at the scene, he never does. That will eventually mean something, but just now it's a subtle touch, something most of the readers may not even pick up on." The Hound as the Beast: "Getting to write words for Ron Perlman was one of the best parts of the three years I spent as a writer and producer on BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. We had a great team on that show; terrific writers, a top-notch crew, and a superb cast. Ron was twice nominated for an Emmy for his portrayal of Vincent. If anyone ever makes a film of A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE, I wanted him to play the Hound." Beauty and the Beast: "Television -- like virtually ALL art -- operates on the assumption of the implied ellipsis. That is to say, we assume that you know or can infer certain that certain things took place, even if they are not shown on the screen or referred to in dialogue... "The bestiality thing was a concern with certain network execs, and some crazed viewers out there, but it was not the reason for the "no-kissing" rule. Koslow, Witt-Thomas, and CBS were all afraid of going too fast and losing the sexual tension. "Many of us felt there should have been a real kiss at the end of "A Happy Life," but we lost that fight. Howard and Alex finally got a kiss into "Orphans," of course... but actually, I never felt that was the best place for it. I desperately wanted a kiss for the end of the chess scene in "A Kingdom by the Sea," after Catherine tells Vincent that she wished it had been him instead of Elliott, but Ron wouldn't hear of it. "You'd be surprised how many scripts had kisses in them early on... "A television show in active production is a huge on-rushing monster that must be fed. Yes, those of us who worked on B&B did our damndest to make it a good show, and tried to put all sorts of wonderful things into the episodes; literary allusions, foreshadowing, symbolism, you name it. But we also had deadlines, and we were doing a television show, and sometimes things happened for much for, ah, practical reasons... "If Catherine and Vincent had ever married, it would have been in the final episode of the show after a ten-year run, ala M*A*S*H. Our show was a mythic adventure/romance, not a domestic drama. No doubt there are amy many misadventures and challenges after marriage, but that was not what we were about. BEAST KNOWS BEST is a whole different show... "Violence... We were determined that if we were going to depict violenece (or "action" as the network likes to call it), we were going to show it as it really is -- nasty, ugly, painful, with _consequences_ to its victims and perpetrators alike. Too much TV violence is bloodless is all senses of the word; not only don't you see any blood, you don't _feel_ anything. The violence is sanitized, cheap, easy; death is reduced to an act break. "Yes, we fell into that trap too from time to time, but for the most part, we tried to show violence as ugly, gut-wrenching, painful. "In the first draft of "A Kingdom by the Sea," I wrote in a kiss. I felt the scene demanded it, and it was about time. Alas, Kos insisted it come out. Not unexpected. There were other kisses in other episodes -- some times we writers got carried away too -- but Ron was the boss, and he always yanked them. Part of it was the network; not just the bestiality concern, although that was there, but the fear of dissipating the sexual/ romantic tension and seeing the show go the way of MOONLIGHTING and REMINGTON STEELE after they consummated their relation[ship]. Ron and the network both wanted the relationship to progress V*E*R*Y slowly. Also, I think Ron wanted to save The First Kiss for a. a season ending finale, and b. one of his own episodes... "The end-of-second-season trilogy was intended to lead into a beginning-of- third-season trilogy that we've referred to as the "Land of the Dead" storyline... Catherine supposedly screams in the final moment of the second season because she finds Vincent dead in the cave. In the third season, Vincent would have been interred in the catacombs, a grieving Catherine would have tried to get on with her life, and we would have followed Vincent through a bizarre, haunted streets of a city of darkness, where he would have faced many of the men he had killed. Thematically, this was meant to be the resolution of the Trilogy and its themes. "We wanted to use actors from previous episodes, playing characters that Vincent had killed... but he would also meet friends there. We hoped to bring back James Avery as Winslow. Ultimately, he would come face to face with the King of the Dead, who would of course be Paracelsus... again, resolving the Trilogy. And meanwhile his bond with Catherine would reach him even beyond the boundaries of life, and ultimately pull him back to the world of the living. He would wake up and burst free of his crypt, alive again, and we would never know if he had really been dead or not, if the adventure in the Land of the Dead had been true or just a very vivid dream... "Then... well... then came what you call Black Thursday, and Linda, and you know the rest. We never got to do it... "I think that B&B's exploration of the nature and morality of violence begins much earlier than some of you are acknowledging, although I will agree that it was not until late second season and third that these themes were explored in depth. The seeds were always there, however. "Look at the pilot, at the look on Catherine's face as she watches Vincent rip the bad guys to pieces, and at the look on Vincent's face when he sees her watching him. They are, respectively, looks of horror and shame. Now tell me another action show where the hero was ashamed to kill bad guys. We were never HUNTER, not even from the first. "Look at the second show: TERRIBLE SAVIOR. That's one of my own, and I know damn well that the heart of it is an examination of morality of violence. In many ways, Jason Walker is a precursor to the Dark Vincent of later episodes. He too is killing bad guys, but it is scarcely presented as a unquestioned good. The extent to which it is good or bad, the extent to which Jace is like or unlike Vincent... these are precisely what that episode is about." Art: Calendar Art Sansa and the Hound as La Belle et la Bete requested by GRRM, Fan Art selected by GRRM
  19. Next up, Sansa/Sandor (first some parallels with the other Beauty and the Beast story in the series). This was on my profile, but they kindly re-opened the thread. Sansa and Sandor ~ Jaime and Brienne Parallels -- Sansa and the Hound is classic Beauty and the Beast, Jaime and Brienne is Beauty and the Beast with a twist (Brienne the Beauty is Beastly on the outside) Joffrey was Sansa’s prince, Renly was Brienne’s prince Both Beauties, Sansa and Brienne, receive roses from men they reject, Loras and Red Ronnet respectively, and replace in their thoughts and dreams with their respective Beasts, Sandor and Jaime Both pairings explore themes sexual awakening and innocence vs. experience, with a 15 year age gap between Beauty and Beast Florian and Jonquil and true knights come up with both Beauty and the Beast pairs, too Sandor tells Sansa there no are true knights, Jaime tells Brienne there are no true knights; then both men are true knights Both Beauty and the Beast pairs have key rescue scenes; Sandor rescues Sansa from rape, Jaime rescues Brienne from rape Sansa thanks Sandor after the rescue, Brienne thanks Jaime after the rescue; both remember the rescues There’s a symbolic sex scene for both Beauty and the Beast pairs; Blackwater for Sansa/Sandor, the sword fight for Jaime/Brienne; both scenes are filled with sexual symbolism (both men pull daggers on the women) Sansa thinks many times about Sandor’s cloak, and he gives it to her twice, and she keeps it in a cedar chest, and she remembers Sandor giving her his cloak and dreams of him in the marriage bed with her instead; Brienne dreams of the time Renly gave her the Kingsguard cloak, but then she dreams of Jaime giving her the cloak instead Both Beauty and the Beast pairs miss each other after they are separated ("I wish the Hound were here" and "Would that Jaime had come with me" and much more)
  20. Le Cygne

    Jonsa

    Maybe it was all that kissing and marriage bed stuff about Sandor coming from Sansa. GRRM sure wrote a lot of it...
  21. Le Cygne

    Jonsa

    He added that to the story when fans said it would be more dramatic. If you want to talk about Sansa's knight... there's a ton of references for Sandor, and they are all coming from Sansa. There's a tourney where she says he will win, filled with Beauty and the Beast symbolism. He protects her and rescues her over and over again. When she's in trouble again, she imagines he's there, hears his voice. They talk about Florian and Jonquil and true knights repeatedly. She keeps his cloak with her summer silks (a cloak she positively obsesses about). And much more. Lots more here...
  22. Le Cygne

    Jonsa

    Yeah, she rarely thinks of Jon. She thinks of Sandor's cloak more than Jon. And LOL that Jon is tall. Nope. There is a guy she hits all of the tall, strong, protect, cloak, kiss, and much more notes with, however. Yeah, she runs right into him! And one by one he takes on everything she's been thinking about. Help me, she prayed, send me a friend, a true knight to champion me... Sansa found herself thinking of Lady again. She could smell out falsehood, she could... Home, she thought, home, he is going to take me home, he'll keep me safe, my Florian... Then he has Sansa run straight into Sandor: She was racing headlong down the serpentine steps when a man lurched out of a hidden doorway. Sansa caromed into him and lost her balance. Iron fingers caught her by the wrist before she could fall. And one by one, Sandor takes on each: "You like knights, don't you?... True knights..." "A dog can smell a lie, you know." "I never got my song... Florian and Jonquil?"
  23. Le Cygne

    Jonsa

    Like this? Sansa on Sandor, the tall strong man in her story who repeatedly protects her (as she has noted many times): As the boy's lips touched her own she found herself thinking of another kiss. She could still remember how it felt, when his cruel mouth pressed down on her own. He had come to Sansa in the darkness as green fire filled the sky. He took a song and a kiss, and left me nothing but a bloody cloak. (also here, have a pic... http://www.georgerrmartin.com/grrm_fromfans/san-san-str) Sansa's match for Sansa: She had dreamed of her wedding a thousand times, and always she had pictured how her betrothed would stand behind her tall and strong, sweep the cloak of his protection over her shoulders, and tenderly kiss her cheek as he leaned forward to fasten the clasp. Lots more story where that came from...
  24. Le Cygne

    Rant and Rave without Repercussions [S7 Leaks Edition]

    Oh yeah, Myrcella, too. That's another that will be hard. Yeah, I loved the name day scene in the books, he was very brave and good. Damn.
  25. Le Cygne

    Rant and Rave without Repercussions [S7 Leaks Edition]

    Oh, GRRM, Tommen is going to be a hard death to read about. I always knew he was doomed because of what Maggy the Frog said, but still. He's just this very sweet victim of horrible people.
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