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LugaJetboyGirl-irra

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About LugaJetboyGirl-irra

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  • Birthday 06/24/1978

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  1. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    Oh, and George Martin's Wild Cards is eligible for Best Series due to Low Chicago, etc.
  2. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    Kelly York & Rowan Altwood's A Light Amongst Shadow's was very spooky. More eligible titles have been collected here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1pWyD-eQP_O6grT6aEUFJxm_qLcn7MCnTKQdFA4ajCu0/edit#gid=1905433534
  3. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    For those who still have some spots on their nomination ballot, here's an open spreadsheet where people put their recs: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1pWyD-eQP_O6grT6aEUFJxm_qLcn7MCnTKQdFA4ajCu0/edit#gid=0
  4. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    I just finished Spinning Silver. I thought it was much better than Uprooted. I really enjoyed it (though I wouldn't call it groundbreaking). I wouldn't really characterize it as YA and think it is better nominated for the Hugo, not to mention the publisher lists it as adult lit (arbitrary, I know). I do agree that both it and Binti do blur the line, though, Binti especially, since it was much more a 'coming of age' story than Silver. Edit: I also suggest KD Edwards' The Last Sun (Novel and for the Campbell), for a solid urban fantasy.
  5. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    Ehn. I thought it was very entertaining but not Hugo worthy. It's a standard urban fantasy (inspired by one particular cultural tradition that has been generally overlooked), and it had some serious plot and characterization problems. It's got a five star average on Amazon which I just really don't think is warranted given its 'first novel' weaknesses.
  6. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    I recommend for nomination Adam Whitehead (Werthead) and the Wertzone for Best Fan Writer.
  7. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    Here is the list of works that (as of now) will be considered for the Hal Clement YA award for science fiction: https://sfnotables.org/about-the-lists/2018-list/
  8. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    Goodreads will also have the best of 2018 SF at the end of the year. Their normal YA list at the moment is gigantic, though. Here's some other lists: B & N Teen Sci-fi: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/teen/13-anticipated-science-fiction-novels-2018/ B & N Teen Fantasy: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/teen/anticipated-ya-fantasy-novels-2018/ Another longer B & N Teen Fantasy list: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/teen/50-of-our-most-anticipated-ya-fantasy-novels-of-2018-july-to-december/ A blogger's anticipated YA sci-fi list: https://vickywhoreads.wordpress.com/2018/01/08/most-anticipated-ya-sci-fi-novels-of-2018/
  9. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    I've also thought that was a great cover. I think this is a good point. We could also keep track of YA related fan art, professional art, and covers that we think should be nominated. I will update the OP.
  10. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Urban Fantasy/Paranormal Romance v. 3.0

    Recently finished THE LAST SUN by K.D. Edwards. It's set in the present day, but a little while after a civil war between the families of previously hidden Atlantis wrecked the world. The Atlanteans now live in a new city on the US east coast because Atlantis is no longer inhabitable. They are organized into the Houses of the Tarot, with the family's head the Arcana. The Arcana are basically the closest thing to gods on the planet, with vast powers. The main character is the Scion of Sun House (the heir), but his entire House was destroyed when he was a teen and his family wiped out. He's barely started coming into his sun powers and has limited magic, so he and his best friend/body guard Brand support themselves by solving mysteries/problems as mercenaries (not military style, just find-lost-things or steal-shit-mercenaries). Meanwhile, all the Houses compete with each other as they get up to trouble in New Atlantis. I thought the world-building was very richly done, with an interesting social and cultural reality, magic system, and cast of characters. There's good queer representation. For a debut novel I think it was quite well done, although I am still not convinced on who the main love interest is supposed to be, which irks me, because I am firmly on one particular Team. Definitely recommend. (Content warning for sexual violence, though.)
  11. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    Dude. I don't care about what others will probably nominate or what you would have nominated last year. Tell us some actual books that you have read from 2018 that you think we should nominate. This is your chance to actually impact the nomination process.
  12. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    2018 : )
  13. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    The 'previous calendar year.' And you need your membership by December 31.
  14. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    Hugo Nominations and Awards - Onwards to 2020

    Well, why don't you stop complaining and suggest some damn nominations, then? This is a thread for 2019 Hugo nominations! Show us your excellent taste and we can all move on with discussing actual books to nominate.
  15. LugaJetboyGirl-irra

    YA Hugo Nominations, 2019 Dublin

    I offer for consideration Dread Nation by Justina Ireland. It's set just after the US Civil War, and considers racial injustice in a post-apocalyptic world where slavery was only made illegal because the shambler apocalypse happened in the middle of the Civil War and the South needed to be saved by the North. The shamblers (zombies, restless dead) have been infected by a virus that evolves during the book. Black and native people are forcibly taken to combat schools (modeled on 'reeducation schools') so that they can do the hard and dangerous work of killing shamblers. The book starts with the main character Jane at a combat school. What I really liked about the book was Jane's voice and personality, which came across so clearly. The world building was pretty cool, and it was interesting to see a YA book that addressed racial injustice through the lens of zombies (I generally find zombies boring, but not in this case), and considered how the zombie apocalypse would play out in the historical and cultural worlds of the US in the aftermath of the Civil War.
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