Jump to content

Nabarg

Members
  • Content count

    35
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Nabarg

  1. Nabarg

    Rothfuss XV: Move along, nothing to see here

    In Westeros, there may exist plants that doesn’t exist in our world from which it is easy to extract black dyes in plenty. One of the advantages of fantasy relative to historical fiction.
  2. Nabarg

    The Decline of the West, by Oswald Spengler

    Gene Wolfe on the other hand feels like he belongs in the magian civilization.
  3. Nabarg

    The Decline of the West, by Oswald Spengler

    More, better, bigger, faster, and the self made businessman growing ever richer certainly sounds Faustian. And golden age science fiction seems like a very Faustian kind of literature.
  4. Nabarg

    The Decline of the West, by Oswald Spengler

    Thanks for the explanation, Marquis. The name magian makes it sound as if the origins where in Zoroastrian Persia, but Spengler thinks it was a offshoot of the appolonian? Was Persian civilization a totally different one?
  5. Nabarg

    The Decline of the West, by Oswald Spengler

    I get what you (or rather Spengler) mean by labeling the western civilization “faustian”. Could you, if it is not to bothersome, describe what characterized some of the others like the “appolonian”, “magian” and some more. I now this is not real historical science, but this kind of thing really stimulates the epic fantasy reader (maps and appendix) in me.
  6. Nabarg

    Bakker LVI: the Rectum of Creation

    But it was no ordinary novel, it was......
  7. Then I guess you think Robin Hobb is grimdark to? Blood Song was less dark than the Farseer trilogy.
  8. If you are referring to Blood Song, I don’t think Ryan was grimdark at all.
  9. Nabarg

    On realism, grimdark and childishness

    Giants all the way down...
  10. Nabarg

    On realism, grimdark and childishness

    I think it is wrong to consider Geralt of Rivia a peasants hero. You may as well claim the knights templars (in our real world) as peasants.
  11. Nabarg

    Favorite books/series about elves?

    As l asked earlier: how is elves defined? Do they have to be called elves? If not, where is the line drawn between elves and non-elves?
  12. Nabarg

    Favorite books/series about elves?

    How central does the elves have to be to the story in order for it to focus on elves? And what is the definition of elves? Do they have to be called elves. What about Sithi? Or Tiste?
  13. Nabarg

    Malazan: High House Shadow edition

    Toll the Hounds is my favorite, so I guess I am one of the divisive guys. Even more divisive, Deadhouse Gates is the one I like least (but if you take away the first karsaorlongcentric fourth of House of Chains, that would be the one I like least).
  14. Nabarg

    A Family of Caligulas

    The Patriarchy was not restored after the October revolution, but simultaneously to it. After the February revolution, when the church got the tsar of its back, it began the process of restoring the Patriarchy. The Patriarch (a bishop from Alaska, by the way) was elected during October, possibly on the same days as Lenin’s putsch. When that Patriarch died in the twenties, the Bolsheviks denied an election of a new Patriarch. Stalin then brought Patriarchy back after being attacked by Germany, as a means of bolstering patriotism.
  15. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    I think my point still stands. Once you have some Uruk-hai (of course bred from humans and ordinary orcs, I never meant to deny that as a starting point) you can go on breeding them with each other, since they will probably not be sterile, just as halfelves are not sterile (Elrond and Elros was after all second generation halfelves, being children not to man and elf, but to two halfelves).
  16. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    I thought Saruman just continued to breed Uruk-hai with Uruk-hai. There is in Tolkien’s world no reason to believe them to be sterile. Half-elves are not sterile, so why would half-orcs?
  17. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    @SeanF: I think there is a difference between Rohirrim (and other northmen) versus Dunedain; the former have that tribal sense of warrior honour, and the later not. Or rather, some of them (like Boromir) do, which is one thing that Faramir laments. Among the elves, the Noldor seem more obsessed with honour than the rest of the elves (and Feanor and sons most of all).
  18. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    @The Gray Wolf: at least orthodox Islam has an interpretation of Gods omnipotence and providence (including predestination to heaven and hell). The Mutazila of the early centuries of Islam had a very different, free will view. Calvin, who was a humanist scholar before he became a religious reformer, based his views of providence as much on ancient stoicism as on the Bible. I am not aware of what made orthodox Islam come to the same conclusions.
  19. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    The point is, I think, not whether they could be saved, but whether they could know they could be saved. The bleakness is epistemological, not ontological.
  20. Nabarg

    Tolkien 2.0

    As one of the Valar, Morgoth holds real power over the earth that are more than a tempter. After ge is thrown out in the void, he works more like a tempter only, or rather even less than that.
×