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Pilusmagnus

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About Pilusmagnus

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    Council Member
  • Birthday 08/31/1996

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    Male
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    France

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  1. Bayaz is definitely not an overarching planner who is fourty steps ahead of everyone else. He just knows how to use chaos to strengthen the system. When he starts to lose power, he creates a crisis and mostly improvises from there. The fact that he is behind all the events doesn't mean he intends them to happen, but that he is working through them with his magic. He appears to be in total control not in a Palpatine kind of way ("everything that has transpired has done so according to my design") but because he knows even the most unpredictable action taken by one of his pawns can be turned to his advantage. It's also clear from the way he acts in the first trilogy that he's far from entirely rational and calculating; he's also incredibly rash and petty.
  2. Took my time reading this one, and I finally finished it. I like that rather than try to surprise us with twists yet again, Joe is relying on our knowledge of the previous trilogy to let us piece together Bayaz' plan by ourselves, and maybe he's working on a misdirection from there. You would naturally expect that Bayaz orchestrated the murder of Scale and the Valbeck uprising, being very probably behind the Burners, and of course the murder of King Jezal. And at the party when the "partner swap" happens, Orso reflects that Rikke suddenly appears to him "like magic", a subtle way of letting us know who is at work here. Joe's also firm in only letting us experience the story through the eyes of the new characters who know less about the world than we do. In that way, there's an overarching dramatic irony that sets the tone of the book. You know that something bad is gonna happen but you are stuck in the heads of those who have no idea of the danger Bayaz represents. That's also why we are denied a satisfying ending for a character we spent three books in the head of. Just like Orso when he discovers he's never gonna share a moment with his father again, we are bereft from sharing Jezal's last moments and thoughts. But I can definitely picture Jezal secretly summoning Glokta in his private quarters at two in the morning and telling him in a fit of panic that he feels threatened by Bayaz, and Glokta responding with a sigh: "Jezal. Did you tell the First of the Magi to fuck off again?"
  3. I'll be attending Joe's talk and signing tonight in London. I can't think of a question to ask him and I don't like to be standing in awkward silence as he signs my copy. Does anyone have a question they would like to ask him?
  4. Pilusmagnus

    2018 Reading Self-Challenge

    Goal is 30. - William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return, by Ian Doescher - Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock - Imperium in Imperio, by Sutton E. Griggs - Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving and translation by Philippe Jaworski - The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, translated by Daniel Lauzon - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, translated by Daniel Lauzon - Cyrano de Bergerac, translated by Christopher Fry - Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, by Hayao Miyazaki - William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher - William Shakespeare's The Clone Army Attacketh, id. - Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons - Three other comic books which I count as one - William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge by Ian Doescher - Orlando Furioso by Ariosto and Italo Calvino - Il visconte dimezzatto by Italo Calvino - Röde Orm, Volume One by Frans Gunnar Bengtsson - Portrait du traducteur en escroc by Bernard Hoepffner - Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley - Il barone rampante by Italo Calvino - Röde Orm, Volume Two by Frans Gunnar Bengtsson - Il cavaliere inesistente by Italo Calvino 21/30 Translations read: Completed Non-fiction: 0/3 Books in Spanish: 0/1
  5. Pilusmagnus

    2018 Reading Self-Challenge

    My goal was 40. I'm now dropping it to 30. Sub-goals: 1/ I want to read at least 10 non-fiction books, among which: At least 3 books of social sciences (dropping that) At least 3 books of literary theory At least 1 book of history (dropping that) 2/ I want to read at least two books in Spanish (dropping to one) 3/ I want to read at least 5 translations of books already read - William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return, by Ian Doescher - Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock - Imperium in Imperio, by Sutton E. Griggs - Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving and translation by Philippe Jaworski - The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, translated by Daniel Lauzon - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, translated by Daniel Lauzon - Cyrano de Bergerac, translated by Christopher Fry - Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, by Hayao Miyazaki - William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher - William Shakespeare's The Clone Army Attacketh, id. - Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons - Three other comic books which I count as one - William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge by Ian Doescher 13/30 Translations read: 4/5 Literary theory: 0/3 Books in Spanish: 0/1 Let's hope I'll be able to increase my rythm now that I'm on holiday.
  6. Which asserts my view that Gurkhul is a subverted and self-conscious orientalist cliché, but an orientalist cliché nonetheless.
  7. Them being a nation of free-will-deprived slaves submitted to the aura of an all-powerful God-Emperor, that are contrasted against the individualistic rationalistic mindset of the pseudo-democratic pseudo-Enlightened Union doesn't make it clear enough? And again, I'm not saying that the Gurkhish are set up as worse than the Union. That's beside the point. Nor do I consider orientalism to be an unforgivable crime. GRRM does it too, and I still like the Essos chapters. I'm not exactly reading Abercrombie to avoid clichés. To subvert them, you first have to use them, right?
  8. Those aren't contradictory statements at all.
  9. Orientalism doesn't mean that the Eastern-type regions are presented as worse than the Western-type ones. It just means they are built around the harmful erroneous representations that allowed Europeans to assert their moral superiority over colonized lands. The Union is just as cliché as Gurkhul but it's not a harmful cliché because it comes from within.
  10. The orientalism from the first trilogy is already too strong to be undone. I'd rather Joe just went with it, because he's not known for extremely subtle depiction of the West and "savagery" either, but the location of the new trilogy proves that he doesn't want to go that way and I'll admit it's an honest move.
  11. I must admit the trilogy being set mostly in the Union and North doesn't really raise my expectations. I hoped we would visit other places.
  12. Pilusmagnus

    2018 Reading Self-Challenge

    My goal was 40. Sub-goals: 1/ I want to read at least 10 non-fiction books, among which: At least 3 books of social sciences At least 3 books of literary theory At least 1 book of history 2/ I want to read at least two books in Spanish 3/ I want to read at least 5 translations of books already read It's almost the middle of the year and I'm far from reaching my goal! I'll have to spend the whole summer reading to manage it. - William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return, by Ian Doescher - Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock - Imperium in Imperio, by Sutton E. Griggs - Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving and translation by Philippe Jaworski - The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, translated by Daniel Lauzon - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, translated by Daniel Lauzon - Cyrano de Bergerac, translated by Christopher Fry - Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, by Hayao Miyazaki 8/40 Translations read: 4/5 Social sciences: 0/3 Literary theory: 0/3 History: 0/1 Books in Spanish: 0/2
  13. Couldn't agree more. A year ago their twitter/instagram account was just funny videos of them being kids and having fun together. Now half of it is just magazine covers and photoshoots of them in very lascivious, extremely not-appropriate positions for kids. In the cynical mind of show-business, it's never too soon to start turning actors into sexual products. That and indeed overexposure to cameras in talk-shows and interview is not healthy for them. You mention the 26 year old model thing, but what about the journalist who casually asked him: "What do you think of the adult person who said she wanted to hit you up in 4 years?" That's equally inappropriate and has psychological effects that should not be overlooked.
  14. More like they were 12-13 last season and Will was 11 and now they're 13-14 and he's 12.
  15. It's based on the actors' ages. I always assumed that Will, being apparently quite gifted, probably skipped classes.
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