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Aemon Stark

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About Aemon Stark

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    Land of Wind and Rain
  • Birthday August 2

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  1. Re Cabin in the Woods, I kinda enjoyed it at the time, but it wasn't really that funny. It was, I suppose, clever, but I've never bothered to rewatch. Watched original 1960 Psycho last night - it's still really effective, even though some of the effects don't quite work. And the weird exposition from the psychiatrist at the end is a false note.
  2. In the Hands of the Prophets generally considers the religious elements through a political lens. Sisko may be a sort of religious figure, but it’s all politics. Then-Vedak Winn arrives to “sharpen the contradictions” and arrange for the assassination of a political opponent. She certainly has no spiritual motive of note. We could go into more detail here, of course, but the point is that JMS didn’t come up with this, and has even exonerated the very authors of the DS9 bible.
  3. Well, since this argument has been going on for almost 30 years, it's hard to see how it will ever be settled. But at most you're talking about coincidence based on the vaguest, most simplistic similarities. And it hardly matters, except that JMS and B5 fans seem to think the supposedly "derivative" aspects of DS9 should detract from its greatness or uniqueness as a Star Trek show or a scifi series generally. But he didn't have any prophetic destiny in the show after the pilot until season five. Yes, Opaka tells him that he will find the "Celestial Temple", and that he was always "destined" to find it. But that makes Opaka the prophet... unless we consider that she has access to a so-advanced-it's-magic device in an Orb, which allows her to access the non-linear and non-corporeal Prophets. I've always felt it was of a "hard scifi" concept. In fact, "the Sisko" doesn't even have particular importance to the "wormhole aliens" until season four's Accession when some other guy shows up thinking he's the Emissary (and Sisko, while initially relieved, eventually opposes him for entirely political reasons). It's only in season five's Rapture where Sisko receives an actual vision that has "prophetic" importance. And there's little to no evidence any writers were thinking about that early on, let alone Piller who left after season two for Voyager. What dialogue or other text supports this? And the idea of alien races ascribing religious significance to Starfleet officers is, actually, very "Trek". Roddenberry was at most peripherally involved in TNG until his death in 1991, was never show-runner, and has writing credits only for Encounter at Farpoint, Hide and Q, and Datalore. I'd never heard of Richard Arnold before, but a cursory review of his IMDB demonstrates zero writing credits - not sure what sort of "research" he did, but how was he "working with the writers" let alone privy to outside story pitches to Paramount executives? Memory Alpha says his job involved "(vetting) proposals and final manuscripts for licensed tie-ins (novels, comics, guidebooks, video cover art, etc.) on behalf of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, until Roddenberry died in 1991". In this interview*, Arnold describes his title as "made-up". (*He also talks about how he's "not the greatest fan of" Duet and manages to misquote Kira's final critical line in the episode. So maybe I should have had his job.) They did kinda do that episode. Wasn't great. Which is to say, there's no direct evidence of anything apart from some vague history and a lot of self-righteous indignation and supposition from JMS. Interestingly, the series bible doesn't mention a whole lot about this idea, except that finding the wormhole would make Bajor the "leading center of commerce and scientific exploration in the sector", rather than the backwater posting Sisko thought he ended up with. And the Cardassians themselves date from the season before she appeared.
  4. There are superficial similarities, but that's about it. The central premise of B5 as a "novel" for television is completely absent in DS9's format, Sisko never had "survivor guilt" (he was mourning his wife and not over it until confronted by the fact), this "Terran defeat" in The Best of Both Worlds was already produced (in 1990!) - and didn't B5 change captains after its first season? The deconstruction of the Federation utopia didn't really occur until the Maquis were introduced well into the show (and essentially in synergy with TNG).
  5. Feed to writers... several years later? The timing doesn't make any sense, and the people involved in the pitch weren't involved with DS9. Sure, the Bajorans called Sisko the "Emissary" from the premiere onward, but Sisko didn't take it seriously until at least season four. The Prophets were still just the "wormhole aliens" in the season one finale. Plus a lot of that early stuff derives more from Arthur C. Clarke's concept that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. DS9 didn't really lean into mysticism or ideas about "prophetic importance" in any literal way until at least Rapture in season five. Before that - and especially early on - it was all pretty secular, even Bajoran politics (the odd "orb experience" aside).
  6. Wait, he apparently never even watched DS9? How do you know something is a "rip-off" if you've never even watched it? I never quite made it past season one of Babylon 5, possibly because the production values and acting have aged terribly. I know it gets a lot better, and the overarching plot is really well done. But while Babylon 5 was planned out from the get-go (supposedly), DS9 definitely wasn't - the early focus on Bajoran politics gave way to slow introduction of the Dominion, likely with studio pressure for more traditional "starship" adventures with the Defiant, then changing gears in season four with Worf's arrival and a war with the Klingons. What often made it work was that it wasn't constrained by a clear "five (or seven) year plan" or a strictly serialized structure.
  7. If I were to speculate, he needed a stent for an occluded graft or artery, which means he’d be on “dual anti-platelet therapy”. And he could be on something else too. Either way, lots of potential for easy bruising, especially in the “frail elderly”.
  8. That's some major bruising. He's got bandaids on both hands too. He does not look like a well man - I've usually only seen bruising like that on people with conditions requiring anticoagulation and/or antiplatelets. Given that he had a CABG in 2003, he'd be at risk for recurrence disease or further complications. But that much bruising is usually something I see in the frail elderly, admittedly a term that could be applied to a lot of senior US politicians. Say what you want about our Supreme Court or Senate; at least they have mandatory retirement at 75! Link for reference: https://twitter.com/MeidasTouch/status/1318954641552334849/photo/1
  9. I think proposing an "anti-corruption" committee was fairly ridiculous, but it was hardly a true "confidence" measure. It's time we removed the ability of PMs (and premiers) to make arbitrary declarations about what is and what is not a confidence vote, let alone control the timing of elections. But it's the job of Parliament to investigate and hold the government to account. That includes having access to information about the COVID-19 response and innumerable issues that the government is quite literally stonewalling and filibustering to prevent release of. I don't like O'Toole, but he is not proposing a vote of non-confidence, only the release of documents related to the pandemic response at the Health Committee level. Canadian governments have always been very resistant to transparency, and I have little doubt the Conservatives would be behaving much differently. That, in itself, is the problem. And yes, we've done better than the US or the UK (not Quebec though...), but if our standard to compare against includes Trump and Boris Johnson, we're in bad company. We've had a highly fragmented response, and now a second wave with an even higher disease burden (if lesser mortality) than before. Part of the problem is that we have the likes of Ford, Legault, and Kenney governing over half the country. But Ottawa took a long, long time to do much of substance, and in recent times they destroyed stockpiles of PPE without replacement, failed to reverse poor governance decisions at PHAC, and were caught completely unawares about the dismantling of the Global Public Health Intelligence Network. We had a pointless prorogation which was used to reiterate the same promises the Liberals have done nothing about for years (child care, pharmacare), and a general pandemic response that hasn't provided much more than enhanced EI - important, but not enough, and not enough to coordinate or lead us through this time.
  10. I really hope they didn't keep the lame Space Force instead.
  11. Probably Home Alone. Nothing beats a plain cheese pizza accompanying it. Also if my brother (brother-in-law?) ever called my kid a “little jerk” I’d tell him to find his own way to Paris. Totally Buzz’s fault too.
  12. Burnham is okay, but she's a very reactive character. She had a strong introduction but has always seemed very passive ever since. The Spock connection always seemed distracting and unnecessary. It also never made much sense and felt like a retcon. The bigger problem with Discovery and, ultimately, Picard was how scattershot the writing was. Redesigning the Klingons is all well and good, but long scenes of subtitled dialogue isn't, and the makeup made the actors seem to disappear. Imagine if Gowron had looked like that!
  13. By Jonze's counterpart, we mean Giovanni Ribisi's photographer character, right?
  14. I’ll definitely keep Disney+ if Bob’s Burgers gets added. I still don’t get why all the Touchstone/Hollywood pictures movies haven’t appeared.
  15. This. I'm enjoying the show overall, but really can't binge it. And as soon as the kitten thing progressed, I needed to extract our majestic 18 lbs tuxedo from his nest in the dog kennel for a cuddle.
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