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averde

[Book spoilers] Thenn Cannibalism

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^ Something tells me we'll be seeing the Greatjon again, possibly with a short scene in this coming season, but more likely some time next season. They didn't choose to send Osha & Rickon to the Last Hearth for no reason, and I can see the Umber's (through Greatjon) and the Manderly's (through Wyman Manderly) representing the northern rebellion in the fifth season.


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I loved everything about that scene but wish it was any other sub-culture group in the Wildlings. The Thenns are the closest thing to nobility North of the Wall and they've turned them into monsters:( Albeit, very-cool looking monsters.


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I've only read the first few pages of this discussion, but in regard to the cannibalism.. Eh, I didn't like it much. But, having the Thenns and Ygritte/Tormund on the same side gives a good amount of confliction for the viewer. It goes with the Jorah line in the previews-- "It's tempting to see your enemies as evil, but there is good and evil on both sides of every war ever fought" or whatever he says.



Becasue of the Thenns, the Battle of the Wall will be like the Battle of Blackwater, in a sense. With Blackwater, we were rooting against Joffrey... But if KL fell, Sansa and Tyrion were in grave danger. Just like with the Wall, we root for Jon, but hate Janos; and if Jon wins, the Thenns are gone, but then Tormund/Ygritte are in danger. So I like having all of that going into a battle.


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I don't mind that they added cannibalism to their culture, but the way it was introduced was about the least subtle way you could have introduced it.

How do you subtly introduce cannibalism in like a 5 min scene?

And why do people keep acting like there aren't wildling cannibals. Thenns are clearly an amalgamation of the Ice River Clans.

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While they look very impressive, I'm not sure what I think about the changes yet. I'm note sure how it is going to work moving forward to the next seasons.


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Anyone notice that Styr was modeled on the Persian King in 300, even had that kinky, loose hipped walk...


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I don't know if this was mentioned before, but I think the only reason they made the Thenns like that is to let the viewers know (non-book reading viewers I mean) how much more dangerous they were compared to the other wildlings. In the books they had laws, discipline and could forge their own weapons and armor which made them a lot more dangerous than regular wildlings. It would've been a lot more difficult and expensive to actually show their society.



BTW, does anybody know the name of the song they used to introduce them?


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BTW, does anybody know the name of the song they used to introduce them?

Nah, but it will most likely be on the soundtrack when its released. Ramin Djawadi is killing it again; Oberyn's theme is just as awesome.

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I loved everything about that scene but wish it was any other sub-culture group in the Wildlings. The Thenns are the closest thing to nobility North of the Wall and they've turned them into monsters:( Albeit, very-cool looking monsters.

The reason they didn't make up a new clan is simple. Why make up a new one with totally new characters when you can use an existing clan with characters that have already been created and just alter them to your preference? It's not like the Thenns were especially important in the books.

The only real difference between the Thenns and the ice river clans (dietary beliefs aside) is that we see the Thenns in the books and they have a simpler, better name.

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I feel that I just have to mention that I actually had Crow for dinner last night ;-). I'd post a picture of the plate but it doesn't seem like you can upload them here, right? Odd as it may sound, but in spring young crows are commonly hunted in Sweden, and one restaurant has a tradition of serving Spring Crow during a couple of weeks. Apparently it's best if winter's been rather harsh so they're not too fat which may make them taste a bit oily. It's a dark meat that had a taste and texture somewhat between game and liver (if that makes any sense...).

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I feel that I just have to mention that I actually had Crow for dinner last night ;-). I'd post a picture of the plate but it doesn't seem like you can upload them here, right? Odd as it may sound, but in spring young crows are commonly hunted in Sweden, and one restaurant has a tradition of serving Spring Crow during a couple of weeks. Apparently it's best if winter's been rather harsh so they're not too fat which may make them taste a bit oily. It's a dark meat that had a taste and texture somewhat between game and liver (if that makes any sense...).

Now you've piqued my interest.

There's a graveyard about a kilometer from where I live. Quite a few crows can be seen there, no doubt drawn by the pungent aroma of decomposing flesh. Maybe I could catch and try one. :drool:

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Why not? They're pretty large birds after all, similar in size with a grouse at least, and you basically cut out the breast filets and cook them. We had them somehow braised in some kind of sauce, served cut in slices on top of sautered cabbage with potato croquettes and also with a small sausage which according to the waitress contained crow meat, crow fat and some reindeer meat. All in all a nice combination, though perhaps a bit over-priced but being a speciality very limited in time and availability you just have to live with that...


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Why not? They're pretty large birds after all, similar in size with a grouse at least, and you basically cut out the breast filets and cook them. We had them somehow braised in some kind of sauce, served cut in slices on top of sautered cabbage with potato croquettes and also with a small sausage which according to the waitress contained crow meat, crow fat and some reindeer meat. All in all a nice combination, though perhaps a bit over-priced but being a speciality very limited in time and availability you just have to live with that...

Swedish crows must be slower and far less wary of humans than Australian's crows and ravens. Here they are notoriously difficult to hunt.

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Swedish crows are just as wary and clever and just as difficult to hunt. The crows hunted are commonly young ones, hunted in early spring or late winter, typically March/April. What you do is take advantage of their habit of bullying predators like owls; you put up a plastic owl in a tree for instance and wait for the crows to attack it, well camouflaged and shotgun ready :cool4:


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