Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Angalin

Small questions v.10079

Recommended Posts

Can anyone tell me how long it took for the entourage to get from Winterfell to King's Landing in AGOT? Also, how long Yoren, Arya, and Gendry et al were on the road for before the run in with Ser Amory and his troops?



I've been rereading the relevant chapters, but I haven't been able to figure it out.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone tell me how long it took for the entourage to get from Winterfell to King's Landing in AGOT? Also, how long Yoren, Arya, and Gendry et al were on the road for before the run in with Ser Amory and his troops?

I've been rereading the relevant chapters, but I haven't been able to figure it out.

Check this

http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/topic/84563-most-precise-asoiaf-timeline-in-existence/

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Aj_uNZmcJaTddG9BVU5tRnJJTE5KcE5JRkFha1ZfNUE#gid=8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While reading over Bran's coma chapter in A Game of Thrones, I came to thinking that the three distinctive shadows seen by him could be The Hound (obviously), Joffrey (you know, golden hair; although, I'm aware that some think Oberyn or even Jaime - if it came between those two, I'd choose Jaime for reasons I'll disclose in a moment), and, finally, Ilyn Payne. My reasoning for this is it seems that what he sees pertains to the first book (Ned arguing with Rob, Sansa crying, dragons stirring - which I think refers to Dany and Viserys moving about, but could also foreshadow the dragon eggs hatching). He describes his father and sisters surrounded by shadows. I considered Ilyn Payne because of the description they give of his armor when he first appears (they also point out how terrifying he looks to Sansa) and seeing as he executes Ned Stark, the giant shadow revealing darkness under his helm could be a foreshadowing of him chopping heads off. Has this already been discussed? Should I just go back to my corner and face the wall?


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While reading over Bran's coma chapter in A Game of Thrones, I came to thinking that the three distinctive shadows seen by him could be The Hound (obviously), Joffrey (you know, golden hair; although, I'm aware that some think Oberyn or even Jaime - if it came between those two, I'd choose Jaime for reasons I'll disclose in a moment), and, finally, Ilyn Payne. My reasoning for this is it seems that what he sees pertains to the first book (Ned arguing with Rob, Sansa crying, dragons stirring - which I think refers to Dany and Viserys moving about, but could also foreshadow the dragon eggs hatching). He describes his father and sisters surrounded by shadows. I considered Ilyn Payne because of the description they give of his armor when he first appears (they also point out how terrifying he looks to Sansa) and seeing as he executes Ned Stark, the giant shadow revealing darkness under his helm could be a foreshadowing of him chopping heads off. Has this already been discussed? Should I just go back to my corner and face the wall?

Welcome to the forum. This thread is for small questions. Your question is impossibly large. If you had asked, "Is Illyn Payne considered a likely suspect to be Bran's gain armored in stone?" you would have been in the right place. Best thing to do is search (something like this: a giant in armor made of stone illyn site: asoiaf.westeros.org in Google.) Then, if you don't find what you're looking for, start a new topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While reading over Bran's coma chapter in A Game of Thrones, I came to thinking that the three distinctive shadows seen by him could be The Hound (obviously), Joffrey (you know, golden hair; although, I'm aware that some think Oberyn or even Jaime - if it came between those two, I'd choose Jaime for reasons I'll disclose in a moment), and, finally, Ilyn Payne. My reasoning for this is it seems that what he sees pertains to the first book (Ned arguing with Rob, Sansa crying, dragons stirring - which I think refers to Dany and Viserys moving about, but could also foreshadow the dragon eggs hatching). He describes his father and sisters surrounded by shadows. I considered Ilyn Payne because of the description they give of his armor when he first appears (they also point out how terrifying he looks to Sansa) and seeing as he executes Ned Stark, the giant shadow revealing darkness under his helm could be a foreshadowing of him chopping heads off. Has this already been discussed? Should I just go back to my corner and face the wall?

Google the following line and post this to one of those, there are numerous topics on Bran's visions, and honestly I don't think anyone has considered Ilyn yet so you could be on to something :)

Bran's Vision site:asoiaf.westeros.org

LM beat me to it. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, it's Sandor, Jaime and Petyr :D

This is in reference to this vision, right?

There were shadows all around them. One shadow was as dark as ash, with the terrible face of a hound. Another was armored like the sun, golden and beautiful. Over them both loomed a giant in armor made of stone, but when he opened his visor, there was nothing inside but darkness and thick black blood.

The giant in armor made of stone, with darkness inside and thick, black blood, is Gregor Clegane :) His blood after the poisoning of Oberyn, of course. His emptiness inside his visor, the fact that the guy lost his head, and is now walking around headless as Ser Robert Strong.

Edit: TheCrannogDweller beat me to it :D :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry! I was just so excited with this potential discovery. Thank you for the replies and pointing me in the right direction. I appreciate it very much! Again, my apologies :)


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry! I was just so excited with this potential discovery. Thank you for the replies and pointing me in the right direction. I appreciate it very much! Again, my apologies :)

No worries ;) We're here to help :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone remember which book and chapter has that story that someone tells about the deserters of the NW being put in ice cells at the top of the Wall?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone remember which book and chapter has that story that someone tells about the deserters of the NW being put in ice cells at the top of the Wall?

Only one I could find was in ASoS, Bran IV:

“There are ghosts here,” Bran said. Hodor had heard all the stories before, but Jojen might not have. “Old ghosts, from before the Old King, even before Aegon the Dragon, seventy-nine deserters who went south to be outlaws. One was Lord Ryswell’s youngest son, so when they reached the barrowlands they sought shelter at his castle, but Lord Ryswell took them captive and returned them to the Nightfort. The Lord Commander had holes hewn in the top of the Wall and he put the deserters in them and sealed them up alive in the ice. They have spears and horns and they all face north. The seventy-nine sentinels, they’re called. They left their posts in life, so in death their watch goes on forever. Years later, when Lord Ryswell was old and dying, he had himself carried to the Nightfort so he could take the black and stand beside his son. He’d sent him back to the Wall for honor’s sake, but he loved him still, so he came to share his watch.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone remember which book and chapter has that story that someone tells about the deserters of the NW being put in ice cells at the top of the Wall?

A quick search turns up references to corpses, Karstarks, and a few black brothers who (attempted?) to rape the women in Hardin's tower being confined there, all in Dance.

Edit:Titan's Bastard found it. Didn't have the words "ice cells" in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the only reference to the Night's King in the chapter where Bran and his companions bed down at the Night Fort?

Basically yes, but there's also this:

There are archmaesters at the Citadel who question all of it. Those old histories are full of kings who reigned for hundreds of years, and knights riding around a thousand years before there were knights. You know the tales, Brandon the Builder, Symeon Star-Eyes, Night’s King... we say that you’re the nine hundred and ninety-eighth Lord Commander of the Night’s Watch, but the oldest list I’ve found shows six hundred seventy-four commanders, which suggests that it was written during...”

(then the same basic quote from Jon's POV in the next book)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only one I could find was in ASoS, Bran IV:

There are ghosts here, Bran said. Hodor had heard all the stories before, but Jojen might not have. Old ghosts, from before the Old King, even before Aegon the Dragon, seventy-nine deserters who went south to be outlaws. One was Lord Ryswells youngest son, so when they reached the barrowlands they sought shelter at his castle, but Lord Ryswell took them captive and returned them to the Nightfort. The Lord Commander had holes hewn in the top of the Wall and he put the deserters in them and sealed them up alive in the ice. They have spears and horns and they all face north. The seventy-nine sentinels, theyre called. They left their posts in life, so in death their watch goes on forever. Years later, when Lord Ryswell was old and dying, he had himself carried to the Nightfort so he could take the black and stand beside his son. Hed sent him back to the Wall for honors sake, but he loved him still, so he came to share his watch.

Thanks, thats what I was looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×