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Angalin

Small questions v.10079

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I remember. During the battle between Caraxes and Vhagar, Caraxes is referred to as both "him" and "her". Don't know if this confirms what Maester Aemon said or editing issues.

Thanks for your answers, I'm glad it wasn't just me or my copy of the text that had that issue.

I've always assumed that the dragons were some weird kind of hermaphrodites, like in Jurassic Park where "life will find a way" and the dinosaurs change their sex to procreate. But I did find it odd that random change from page to page.

I guess we will have to wait until future books to find out if it was an edition problem, or dragons have multiple gender identities that change with their moods, or something else.

Do keep in mind that there are several mistakes in tPatQ that seem too big to have been accidentally. Aemond is called Aemon at one occasion, for example, and Viserys I is named Daeron's grandfather, while several sentences before it is explained that Daeron is Alicent's son, and thus also Viserys' son...

Perhaps the him/her mistake is one such mistakes as well.

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Do keep in mind that there are several mistakes in tPatQ that seem too big to have been accidentally. Aemond is called Aemon at one occasion, for example, and Viserys I is named Daeron's grandfather, while several sentences before it is explained that Daeron is Alicent's son, and thus also Viserys' son...

Perhaps the him/her mistake is one such mistakes as well.

I did notice those other errors as well. Hopefully it is wriiten this way on purpose otherwise the editors need a kick up the backside.

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When the books state a daughter is now a "woman grown", does that mean that she's 16 or over? Or does it simply mean that she has had her first flowering?



Because Alys Karstark is described as turning 16 on her next nameday, and a while later, when she's getting married, she's "a woman grown and flowered". So does this mean that Alys turned 16 in between?


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When the books state a daughter is now a "woman grown", does that mean that she's 16 or over? Or does it simply mean that she has had her first flowering?

Because Alys Karstark is described as turning 16 on her next nameday, and a while later, when she's getting married, she's "a woman grown and flowered". So does this mean that Alys turned 16 in between?

A woman grown is a girl who has had her fist flowring I think. I believe Sansa refers to herself as such?

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A woman grown is a girl who has had her fist flowring I think. I believe Sansa refers to herself as such?

Yeah, I saw a mistake in my logic... Later on in the chapter, Jon thinks to himself she'll soon be 16.. My bad..

Though boys are called men grown at the age of 16, so I had hoped that it might be the same for the girls.. Seems not to be the case..

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Yeah, I saw a mistake in my logic... Later on in the chapter, Jon thinks to himself she'll soon be 16.. My bad..

Though boys are called men grown at the age of 16, so I had hoped that it might be the same for the girls.. Seems not to be the case..

I think boys actually consider themselves fully grown earlier than that, if Bran is any indication. He very frequently thinks of himself as "almost a man grown..."

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I think boys actually consider themselves fully grown earlier than that, if Bran is any indication. He very frequently thinks of himself as "almost a man grown..."

Might be an unrelated thing, but isn't the "earning of the spurs" also a refference to a boy reaching manhood? Or is it only a refference to knighthood? And by the way, what does it mean?

One of Marg's cousins was waiting till her fiancee earned his spurs to marry him.

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Might be an unrelated thing, but isn't the "earning of the spurs" also a refference to a boy reaching manhood? Or is it only a refference to knighthood? And by the way, what does it mean?

One of Marg's cousins was waiting till her fiancee earned his spurs to marry him.

Having earned your spurs means that you've been knighted. So Margaerys cousin is waiting until her betrothed is knighted before marrying him.

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What chapter does Jaime and/or Cersei recall having sex on or near Robert's passed out body at Castle Darry?

A Feast for Crows, Jaime IV (chapter 30):

“Do you see that window, ser?” Jaime used a sword to point. “That was Raymun Darry’s bedchamber. Where King Robert slept, on our return from Winterfell. Ned Stark’s daughter had run off after her wolf savaged Joff, you’ll recall. My sister wanted the girl to lose a hand. The old penalty, for striking one of the blood royal. Robert told her she was cruel and mad. They fought for half the night. well, Cersei fought, and Robert drank. Past midnight, the queen summoned me inside. The king was passed out snoring on the Myrish carpet. I asked my sister if she wanted me to carry him to bed. She told me I should carry her to bed, and shrugged out of her robe. I took her on Raymun Darry’s bed after stepping over Robert. If His Grace had woken I would have killed him there and then. He would not have been the first king to die upon my sword. but you know that story, don’t you?” He slashed at a tree branch, shearing it in half. “As I was fucking her, Cersei cried, ‘I want. ’ I thought that she meant me, but it was the Stark girl that she wanted, maimed or dead.” The things I do for love. “It was only by chance that Stark’s own men found the girl before me. If I had come on her first.”

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Could one of you lovely people provide me with a link that shows me exactly how the PL looked printed in the books? I'm playing with something but it requires that I know exactly which word was written on which line & I only have E-books so it may not be the same. Thanks!

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Having earned your spurs means that you've been knighted. So Margaerys cousin is waiting until her betrothed is knighted before marrying him.

Might it be possible that being knighted is considered as reaching the status of formal manhood among the southron highborn circle?

Something like knighthood is for men, squiring for boys. You'll be considered a boy until you earn your spurs. Boys don't marry, only men do, and if you are highborn (but not a lord), you have better be knighted before marrying someone?

Because other than the honour of marrying a knight instead of a squire, kind of makes little difference. And for that matter, if she waits a a few more years, she might be marrying a landed lord (or a completely different person, because he is already a corpse).

ETA: I know it's more or less the same i asked before, but I'm exploring possibilities.

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From Catelyn and Robb's discussion about his possible heirs:

"Your father's father had no siblings, but his father had a sister who married a younger son of Lord Raymar Royce, of the junior branch. They had three daughters, all
of whom wed Vale lordlings. A Waynwood and a Corbray, for certain. The youngest... it might have been a Templeton, but..."

Does lordlings in this case mean Lords? In other words, are those three daughters direct ancestors of the current Corbrays, Waynwoods and maybe Templetons?

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