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Larry.

Andrzej Sapkowski II

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The Tower of the Swallow English translation came out a couple of weeks ago. It's an amazing book.

Edited by C.T. Phipps

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On 6/10/2016 at 3:09 PM, C.T. Phipps said:

The Tower of the Swallow English translation came out a couple of weeks ago. It's an amazing book.

Agh! I missed that. I'm ordering now.

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Now that I got my Amazon/Apple settlement money, I went ahead and bought an ebook edition, just so I can compare the English translation to the Spanish, Italian, and French ones.  Seems decent through the first chapter.

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So, just The Lady of the Lake left, eh? Not counting Season of Storms, which is not a must read anyway. I wonder if he gets the praise he deserves after the whole thing is finally officially translated.

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I suspect there'll be some chatter after The Lady of the Lake is published, considering what happens and how it concludes.  Strange to need to keep things oblique considering the book was originally published over 20 years ago and that in another translation, I read it around 4-5 years ago, but so it goes.

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According to 9gag, it's Sapkowski's birthday today.

Funny, but it's the first time I saw a photo of him.

Edited by baxusz

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4 hours ago, Larry. said:

Strange to need to keep things oblique considering the book was originally published over 20 years ago

Yeah, I remember waiting for another book took longer and longer. And the gap between The Tower of the Swallow and The Lady of the Lake was only two years.

But it's not 20 years yet Larry, The Lady of the Lake was originally published in 1999.

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Bad memory, I guess, since I remembered the earlier volumes coming out in the early 90s.  Still strange to think that some English-language readers of Sapkowski weren't born when the series concluded, though :P

I remember waiting something like 2-3 years for the translation of The Lady of the Lake to appear in Spanish...and then it was divided into two volumes.  At least the first Hussite trilogy book was published between them.  Then again, I'm not certain if Lux Perpetua has been published yet in Spanish.  Been four years since I read the second volume.

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Did you like the Hussite books? I read the first (in German translation) and was not sufficiently impressed to bother with the 2nd... some nice scenes but overall to long, not to the point and very open-ended.

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I liked the second volume more than the first (which I thought was entertaining, but then again, I studied early modern and modern Central European history), but I read those first in Spanish translation.  Attempted to read Lux Perpetua in German, but soon realized that my reading fluency level had dropped quite a bit over 15 years, to the point where I could follow the gist of the story, but not enough to perceive nuances of style enough to review it.  Perhaps I should try it again some day.

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I don't think the historical background put me off. I am not very familiar with that region and epoch but sufficently versed in European history not to be confused or puzzled. "Narrenturm" wasn't bad but very long for the content, I think and the main plot elements were still so disconnected after one large volume that I did not want to spend more time with it.

I might try the second one some time but by now I forgot most of the first one, I am afraid...

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While I agree that it took a bit of time to get the events rolling in Narrenturm, I thought there was an interesting mixture of Hussite fervor, humor, and action by novel's end to merit reading the second, which I liked better for it being a bit more focused on the characters.

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On 6/22/2016 at 5:41 AM, 3CityApache said:

So, just The Lady of the Lake left, eh? Not counting Season of Storms, which is not a must read anyway. I wonder if he gets the praise he deserves after the whole thing is finally officially translated.

 
 

Probably not, I feel like he's too subtle. When I went from the Last Wish to the Blood of Elves, I didn't realize how much a series of short stories in Sword of Destiny would contribute to the rest of the series. When I finally read Sword (fan translation as it looked like we weren't getting an English one), I realized how much those stories set up the characters and relationships of the novels to follow. I don't think I've seen an American --genre-- writer ever do anything like that before. Geralt's relationship with Yennefer can't really be understood without Sword of Destiny--the story with the zuegl, for example, is crushing for Geralt as I read it for the second time--I of course bought the English version when it came out!--and Geralt and Ciri have something I didn't understand fully until I read their stories.

I think about how often Sapkowski spends with Geralt reasoning, feeling, talking, etc., and I suppose people get these books because they want him to just kick ass non-stop. I think Sapkowski might not get the praise he deserves in America.

Edited by Simon Steele

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On 15.07.2016 at 7:59 PM, Simon Steele said:

I think Sapkowski might not get the praise he deserves in America.

Yes, you're probably right. And as for the importance of The Sword of Destiny to the whole series, it's even more significant if you come to realise that it's probably just the best of these seven books. 

Rodrigo, The Season of Storms is ok, but definitely not a must read, and you have a link with the information of the publication plans just four posts above.

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That see

5 hours ago, 3CityApache said:

Yes, you're probably right. And as for the importance of The Sword of Destiny to the whole series, it's even more significant if you come to realise that it's probably just the best of these seven books. 

Rodrigo, The Season of Storms is ok, but definitely not a must read, and you have a link with the information of the publication plans just four posts above.

This  seems to be the opinion of alot of people...I think I'll just skip it rather than be dissappointed since I have such fond memories of the other books. 

Guess  a sequel concerning Geralt is out of the question cause of the games. I hope he returns to the universe someday and writes a story set a couple hundred years later with new characters. 

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The author doesnt consider the games canon so no reason he cant continue if he wants

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14 hours ago, 3CityApache said:

Yes, you're probably right. And as for the importance of The Sword of Destiny to the whole series, it's even more significant if you come to realise that it's probably just the best of these seven books. 

Rodrigo, The Season of Storms is ok, but definitely not a must read, and you have a link with the information of the publication plans just four posts above.

 

Luckily the publisher woke up and released Sword here in the U.S.--I don't know what the hell they were thinking. Sapkowski will be an under the radar genius in my opinion, but that's okay. His books are phenomenal. So many "reviewers" who seem to love the games won't read the books. Their loss. The books are what make the games great.

 

8 hours ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

The author doesnt consider the games canon so no reason he cant continue if he wants

I saw that too--it's one thing that bugs me about him--he seems pretty angry about the success of the games. Or he just hates games in general, I don't know, but he definitely feels like games are for chumps. I feel like the Witcher games (the third in particular) do a great job in realizing the world he created. They are an excellent interpretation of the source material--or so I feel.

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Sapkowski doesn't really hate the games but he doesn't like people asking him about them since he hasn't played them, doesn't know their plot, and considers them essentially a licensed spin-off which doesn't count.

Also, he's a dude in his seventies who spent much of his adult life in a communist country.

Not exactly your typical gamer.

Edited by C.T. Phipps

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