Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Voice

The Hierarchy of the Others

Recommended Posts

An actual torch. Lol. That's what we get for going too deep. When we try to talk superficially, it doesn't work as well anymore haha

I'm imagining Dany, bringing her torch down on Drogo's funeral pyre. But instead of a beautiful young girl, it's a hard, bearded man. Instead of dragon's eggs, it's weirwood. Instead of hatching fast-growing "fire made flesh," the wood plants the slow-growing seed that will become "sidhe made of ice."

What is time to a weirwood?

You totally lost me, what are you talking about "an actual torch?" You know the comet was Mormont's torch, right? Are you saying the lack of a double meaning is actually a triple meaning? Now that I can get behind.

*chuckles*

Seriously though, the drowned God stole fire form the storm god in the form of a lightning bolt. I think it may have been perceived as GOD dropping a burning brand, like from the sky, but not a person. The Grey Kig is larger than life. He slew a sea dragon, something which destroys islands. There is no rational explanation for that, it's a metaphor. All the Grey King stories are metaphors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont want to get off topic so is there another thread where that letter is discussed in further detail.



Some great stuff in there and clearly the story has changed quite a bit since it was writen.



If you could put a link to where the letter came from, and if there is a thread that would be great as well, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay so trying to take this is the only question I have (probably hard to answer) but Now that we have an idea of an Other hierarchy does that translate or is it similar to the westeros I lords

OTHER - WW - WIGHT

BATTLE COMMANDERS - KNIGHTS - MEN AT ARMS

I always assumed the impending WW invasion would be nothing but WW and wights just charging through westeros with no plan or strategy but after reading this I'm leading more towards the WW being not much different from how general westerosi armies go to battle (van guards, flanks and what have you) I guess if we knew more of the long night it'd help.

Basically will the OTher invasion be well planned and strategised or will it be nothing but a shit storm of cold dead bodies?

We're led to believe they were quite coordinated when they first came in the long night. After all, the armies of men, which had been so potent against the cotf, had failed by the time the Last Hero ventured forth, and they had lost a considerable amount of land to the Others.

From some of my comments, you may have guessed that I place Night's King at their helm. So to take your sentiment a bit further, I'd say that rather than "Battle Commanders" they are being led by "Lord Commanders."

We have also seen at the recent massacre at the Fist of the First Men that they can coordinate organized and planned attacks. The incident in the Prologue has always seemed more like a fringe expedition, a clashing of scouts, rather than a real glimpse of the true threat. (Or, as Evolett has suggested, it may have been a training exercise.) The Fist provides a much different example. One, that is more reminiscent of the events in the long night:

Old Nan nodded. "In that darkness, the Others came for the first time," she said as her needles went click click click. "They were cold things, dead things, that hated iron and fire and the touch of the sun, and every creature with hot blood in its veins. They swept over holdfasts and cities and kingdoms, felled heroes and armies by the score, riding their pale dead horses and leading hosts of the slain.

Now that Winter has Come, we will see what they're really capable of. Just as the armies of men have trouble at sea, and the Ironborn have trouble inland, so too are the Others at an extreme disadvantage when the Wall is weeping. We must always bear in mind the events of the five published volumes have all occurred during Summer, except for the few that took place during the extremely brief Fall season. Now that the Others will be able to stretch their arms in their native climate, we'll find them far more formidable. Formidable enough to warrant a 700ft tall wall of Ice, 300 miles long. Formidable enough... to man this Wall for eight thousand years, despite there being no hint of Others persisting after the long night ended, lest the realms of Men be caught unawares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You totally lost me, what are you talking about "an actual torch?" You know the comet was Mormont's torch, right? Are you saying the lack of a double meaning is actually a triple meaning? Now that I can get behind.

*chuckles*

Seriously though, the drowned God stole fire form the storm god in the form of a lightning bolt. I think it may have been perceived as GOD dropping a burning brand, like from the sky, but not a person. The Grey Kig is larger than life. He slew a sea dragon, something which destroys islands. There is no rational explanation for that, it's a metaphor. All the Grey King stories are metaphors.

LOL. I'm down for a triple meaning as well. Hell, seven meanings per motif would be apt I think.

Perhaps I should have stated in that comment that I was talking about the First Men, who came into Westeros, and rather than adopt the Old Gods, sought to subdue them with fire and sword. Only after the Pact did First Men accept the Old Gods. For 2,000 years, they killed cotf, cut down weirwoods, and burned them. It is my belief that this act created the autoimmune response. Weirwoods are not immortal, but they are nearly eternal if left undisturbed. The same seems to be true of the Others.

It is my contention that in the act of killing the trees of life and death, First Men committed an act so unnatural, it had inhuman consequences. In my scenario, their fire and sword = the torch that created the seed that slowly grew into the long night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the Forum :cheers:





I dont want to get off topic so is there another thread where that letter is discussed in further detail.



Some great stuff in there and clearly the story has changed quite a bit since it was writen.



If you could put a link to where the letter came from, and if there is a thread that would be great as well, thanks.





I'd recommend Heresy as a great thread for discussing the letter in more general terms. As for a particular thread to discuss a certain aspect of it, there are many and more. If there is a certain topic you'd like to discuss, I'd recommend searching for that, then bringing up the portion of the letter you've found to be relevant.



Here is the letter in its entirety. The source is George R. R. Martin. The letter is to his agent, Ralph Vicinanza, and originally accompanied the first 13 chapters of A Game of Thrones (there's that number, yet again!). The purpose of it was to generate interest in his "trilogy" and get it published:




October 1993



Dear Ralph,



Here are the first thirteen chapters (170 pages) of the high fantasy novel I promised you, which I'm calling A Game of Thrones. When completed, this will be the first volume in what I see as an epic trilogy with the overall title, A Song of Ice and Fire.



As you know, I don't outline my novels. I find that if I know exactly where a book is going, I lose all interest in writing it. I do, however, have some strong notions as to the overall structure of the story I'm telling, and the eventual fate of many of the principle [sic] characters in the drama.



Roughly speaking, there are three major conflicts set in motion in the chapters enclosed. These will form the major plot threads of the trilogy, intertwining with each other in what should be a complex but exciting (I hope) narrative tapestry. Each of the conflicts presents a major threat to the peace of my imaginary realm, the Seven Kingdoms, and to the lives of the principal characters.



The first threat grows from the enmity between the great houses of Lannister and Stark as it plays out in a cycle of plot, counterplot, ambition, murder, and revenge, with the iron throne of the Seven Kingdoms as the ultimate prize. This will form the backbone of the first volume of the trilogy, A Game of Thrones.



While the lion of Lannister and the direwolf of Stark snarl and scrap, however, a second and greater threat takes shape across the narrow sea, where the Dothraki horselords mass their barbarians hordes for a great invasion of the Seven Kingdoms, led by the fierce and beautiful Daenerys Stormborn, the last of the Targaryen dragonlords. The Dothraki invasion will be the central story of my second volume,A Dance with Dragons.



The greatest danger of all, however, comes from the north, from the icy wastes beyond the Wall, where half-forgotten demons out of legend, the inhuman others, raise cold legions of the undead and the neverborn and prepare to ride down on the winds of winter to extinguish everything that we would call "life." The only thing that stands between the Seven Kingdoms and and endless night is the Wall, and a handful of men in black called the Night's Watch. Their story will be the heart of my third volume, The Winds of Winter. The final battle will also draw together characters and plot threads left from the first two books and resolve all in one huge climax.



The thirteen chapters on hand should give you a notion as to my narrative strategy. All three books will feature a complex mosaic of intercutting points-of-view among various of my large and diverse cast of players. The cast will not always remains the same. Old characters will die, and new ones will be introduced. Some of the fatalities will include sympathetic viewpoint characters. I want the reader to feel that no one is ever completely safe, not even the characters who seem to be the heroes. The suspense always ratchets up a notch when you know that any character can die at any time.



Five central characters will make it through all three volumes, however, growing from children to adults and changing the world and themselves in the process. In a sense, my trilogy is almost a generational saga, telling the life stories of these five characters, three men and two women. The five key players are Tyrion Lannister, Daenerys Targaryen, and three of the children of Winterfell, Arya, Bran, and the bastard Jon Snow. All of them are introduced at some length in the chapters you have to hand.



This is going to be (I hope) quite an epic. Epic in its scale, epic in its action, and epic in its length. I see all three volumes as big books, running about 700 to 800 manuscript pages, so things are just barely getting underway in the thirteen chapters I've sent you.



I have quite a clear notion of how the story is going to unfold in the first volume, A Game of Thrones. Things will get a lot worse for the poor Starks before they get better, I'm afraid. Lord Eddard Stark and his wife Catelyn Tully are both doomed, and will perish at the hands of their enemies. Ned will discover what happened to his friend Jon Arryn, but before he can act on his knowledge, King Robert will have an unfortunate accident, and the throne will pass to his sullen and brutal son Joffrey, still a minor. Joffrey will not be sympathetic and Ned will be accused of treason, but before he is taken he will help his wife and his daughter escape back to Winterfell.



Each of the contending families will learn it has a member of dubious loyalty in its midst. Sansa Stark, wed to Joffrey Baratheon, will bear him a son, the heir to the throne, and when the crunch comes she will choose her husband and child over her parents and siblings, a choice she will later bitterly rue. Tyrion Lannister, meanwhile, befriend both Sansa and her sister Arya, while growing more and more disenchanted with his own family.



Young Bran will come out of his coma, after a strange prophetic dream, only to discover that he will never walk again. He will turn to magic, at first in the hope of restoring his legs, but later for its own sake. When his father Eddard Stark is executed, Bran will see the shape of doom descending on all of them, but nothing he can say will stop his brother Robb from calling the banners in rebellion. All the north will be inflamed by war. Robb will win several splendid victories, and maim Joffrey Baratheon on the battlefield, but in the end he will not be able to stand against Jaime and Tyrion Lannister and their allies. Robb Stark will die in battle, and Tyrion Lannister will besiege and burn Winterfell.



Jon Snow, the bastard, will remain in the far north. He will mature into a ranger of great daring, and ultimately will succeed his uncle as the commander of the Night's Watch. When Winterfell burns, Catelyn Stark will be forced to flee north with her son Bran and her daughter Arya. Hounded by Lannister riders, they will seek refuge at the Wall, but the men of the Night's Watch give up their families when they take the black, and Jon and Benjen will not be able to help, to Jon's anguish. It will lead to a bitter estrangement between Jon and Bran. Arya will be more forgiving... until she realizes, with terror, that she has fallen in love with Jon, who is not only her half-brother but a man of the Night's Watch, sworn to celibacy. Their passion will continue to torment Jon and Arya throughout the trilogy, until the secret of Jon's true parentage is finally revealed in the last book.



Abandoned by the Night's Watch, Catelyn and her children will find their only hope of safety lies even further north, beyond the Wall, where they fall into the hands of Mance Rayder, the King-beyond-the-Wall, and get a dreadful glimpse of the inhuman others as they attack the wildling encampment. Bran's magic, Arya's sword Needle, and the savagery of their direwolves will help them survive, but their mother Catelyn will die at the hands of the others.



Over across the narrow sea, Daenerys Targaryen will discover that her new husband, the Dothraki Khal Drogo, has little interest in invading the Seven Kingdoms, much to her brother's frustration. When Viserys presses his claims past the point of tact or wisdom, Khal Drogo will finally grow annoyed and kill him out of hand, eliminating the Targaryen pretender and leaving Daenerys as the last of her line. Daenerys will bide her time, but she will not forget. When the moment is right, she will kill her husband to avenge her brother, and then flee with a trusted friend into the wilderness beyond Vaes Dothrak. There, hunted by Dothraki bloodriders [?] of her life, she stumbles on a cache of dragon's eggs [?] of a young dragon will give Daenerys the power to bend the Dothraki to her will. Then she begins to plan for her invasion of the Seven Kingdoms.



Tyrion Lannister will continue to travel, to plot, and to play the game of thrones, finally removing his nephew Joffrey in disgust at the boy king's brutality. Jaime Lannister will follow Joffrey on the throne of the Seven Kingdoms, by the simple expedient of killing everyone ahead of him in the line of succession and blaming his brother Tyrion for the murders. Exiled, Tyrion will change sides, making common cause with surviving Starks to bring his brother down, and falling helplessly in love with Arya Stark while he's at it. His passion is, alas, unreciprocated, but no less intense for that, and it will lead to a deadly rivalry between Tyrion and Snow.



[7 Lines Redacted]



But that's the second book...



I hope you'll find some editors who are as excited about all of this as I am. Feel free to share this letter with anyone who wants to know how the story will go.



All best,


George R.R. Martin



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're led to believe they were quite coordinated when they first came in the long night. After all, the armies of men, which had been so potent against the cotf, had failed by the time the Last Hero ventured forth, and they had lost a considerable amount of land to the Others.

From some of my comments, you may have guessed that I place Night's King at their helm. So to take your sentiment a bit further, I'd say that rather than "Battle Commanders" they are being led by "Lord Commanders."

We have also seen at the recent massacre at the Fist of the First Men that they can coordinate organized and planned attacks. The incident in the Prologue has always seemed more like a fringe expedition, a clashing of scouts, rather than a real glimpse of the true threat. (Or, as Evolett has suggested, it may have been a training exercise.) The Fist provides a much different example. One, that is more reminiscent of the events in the long night:

Old Nan nodded. "In that darkness, the Others came for the first time," she said as her needles went click click click. "They were cold things, dead things, that hated iron and fire and the touch of the sun, and every creature with hot blood in its veins. They swept over holdfasts and cities and kingdoms, felled heroes and armies by the score, riding their pale dead horses and leading hosts of the slain.

Now that Winter has Come, we will see what they're really capable of. Just as the armies of men have trouble at sea, and the Ironborn have trouble inland, so too are the Others at an extreme disadvantage when the Wall is weeping. We must always bear in mind the events of the five published volumes have all occurred during Summer, except for the few that took place during the extremely brief Fall season. Now that the Others will be able to stretch their arms in their native climate, we'll find them far more formidable. Formidable enough to warrant a 700ft tall wall of Ice, 300 miles long. Formidable enough... to man this Wall for eight thousand years, despite there being no hint of Others persisting after the long night ended, lest the realms of Men be caught unawares.

Nice answer I'm going to read the battle at the fist now and see what comes up. Really hoping that the WW have a good balance of military tactics and sheer aggression (sort of like dothraki screamers)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Voice

:cheers:

Nice answer I'm going to read the battle at the fist now and see what comes up. Really hoping that the WW have a good balance of military tactics and sheer aggression (sort of like dothraki screamers)

Cool, let me know what you think!

No offense to Dothraki, they're the best horsemen around, but I think the Fist already demonstrates that the Others are far more tactical and formidable in terms of military intelligence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:cheers:

Cool, let me know what you think!

No offense to Dothraki, they're the best horsemen around, but I think the Fist already demonstrates that the Others are far more tactical and formidable in terms of military intelligence.

Sorry I only meant dothraki are screamers not both. Just re read it then it seems that only wights were used in the battle and a bear-wight of course which was used as some sort of shock troop once they had advanced to the defences.. Other then that the only hint of strategic play was attacking from both north and south simultaneously.

Knowing that 1/6 of the forces at the fist escaped the attack seems like they didn't plan for any type of retreat..

One thing we can't/won't know is why they attacked the fist since they only used wights it's hard to say it was training or that thy were bloodying their troops (could have been a commander trying to prove himself???)

Or they saw the fist a a fresh supply of 300 wights which came complete with armour and swords :) don't you love freebies with your "purchases"

So I guess where most armies see every battle a chance of losing troops the OThers see every battle Asa chance of gaining recruits which is odd since there is how many wildlings marching south?

Sory more questions than answers but I find the Others truly fascinating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry I only meant dothraki are screamers not both. Just re read it then it seems that only wights were used in the battle and a bear-wight of course which was used as some sort of shock troop once they had advanced to the defences.. Other then that the only hint of strategic play was attacking from both north and south simultaneously.

We've seen wights. They're not exactly smart. There is no way they are coordinated enough to attack from North and South simultaneously on their own.

And while I agree wights were certainly in abundance, it seems they were not alone. Consider this:

His own mother was a thousand leagues south, safe with his sisters and his little brother Dickon in the keep at Horn Hill. She can't hear me, no more than the Mother Above. The Mother was merciful, all the septons agreed, but the Seven had no power beyond the Wall. This was where the old gods ruled, the nameless gods of the trees and the wolves and the snows. "Mercy," he whispered then, to whatever might be listening, old gods or new, or demons too, "oh, mercy, mercy me, mercy me."
Maslyn screamed for mercy. Why had he suddenly remembered that? It was nothing he wanted to remember. The man had stumbled backward, dropping his sword, pleading, yielding, even yanking off his thick black glove and thrusting it up before him as if it were a gauntlet. He was still shrieking for quarter as the wight lifted him in the air by the throat and near ripped the head off him. The dead have no mercy left in them, and the Others . . . no, I mustn't think of that, don't think, don't remember, just walk, just walk, just walk.
Sobbing, he took another step.

It sounds as if Samwell saw more than just a horde of wights at the Fist.

Knowing that 1/6 of the forces at the fist escaped the attack seems like they didn't plan for any type of retreat..

And it seems as if whoever attacked them knew they were unprepared, not only for retreat, but for the foemen they were about to face. The Night's Watch had spent their time fortifying the Fist against a wildling attack. Had they known wights would give them battle, they no doubt would have prepared for them much differently. I think this speaks to some degree of intel on the other side. They knew it would be a massacre.

One thing we can't/won't know is why they attacked the fist since they only used wights it's hard to say it was training or that thy were bloodying their troops (could have been a commander trying to prove himself???)

Or they saw the fist a a fresh supply of 300 wights which came complete with armour and swords :) don't you love freebies with your "purchases"

Exactly! It's like having an endless army of Unsullied. The wights will not balk at any task. Even better, if they even maintain a 1:1 kill to death ratio, the legions will never decrease in number, as every victim will rise to join the ranks. And, we know that their kill/death ratio was likely much higher than 1:1, given how unprepared the brothers were, the stealth with which the wights attacked, and the savage ferocity with which wights fight. There are no better troops in a melee than wights.

So I guess where most armies see every battle a chance of losing troops the OThers see every battle Asa chance of gaining recruits which is odd since there is how many wildlings marching south?

I think this is precisely why the wildlings are marching south. They learned there is no way to defeat this enemy using conventional means. They realized that Wall was more than a border fence, and wanted across it asap.

And while their legions of undead will be many thousands less, now that the wildlings have made it south, we've no idea how great the numbers are of those that have already fallen to their advance. In the Varamyr Sixskins prologue we get a peek at what this advance looks like. They can swell their numbers using the Cold alone...without ever attacking directly.

Sory more questions than answers but I find the Others truly fascinating.

Same here, as you may have guessed :) the more questions the better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've seen wights. They're not exactly smart. There is no way they are coordinated enough to attack from North and South simultaneously on their own.

And while I agree wights were certainly in abundance, it seems they were not alone. Consider this:

His own mother was a thousand leagues south, safe with his sisters and his little brother Dickon in the keep at Horn Hill. She can't hear me, no more than the Mother Above. The Mother was merciful, all the septons agreed, but the Seven had no power beyond the Wall. This was where the old gods ruled, the nameless gods of the trees and the wolves and the snows. "Mercy," he whispered then, to whatever might be listening, old gods or new, or demons too, "oh, mercy, mercy me, mercy me."

Maslyn screamed for mercy. Why had he suddenly remembered that? It was nothing he wanted to remember. The man had stumbled backward, dropping his sword, pleading, yielding, even yanking off his thick black glove and thrusting it up before him as if it were a gauntlet. He was still shrieking for quarter as the wight lifted him in the air by the throat and near ripped the head off him. The dead have no mercy left in them, and the Others . . . no, I mustn't think of that, don't think, don't remember, just walk, just walk, just walk.

Sobbing, he took another step.

It sounds as if Samwell saw more than just a horde of wights at the Fist.

And it seems as if whoever attacked them knew they were unprepared, not only for retreat, but for the foemen they were about to face. The Night's Watch had spent their time fortifying the Fist against a wildling attack. Had they known wights would give them battle, they no doubt would have prepared for them much differently. I think this speaks to some degree of intel on the other side. They knew it would be a massacre.

Exactly! It's like having an endless army of Unsullied. The wights will not balk at any task. Even better, if they even maintain a 1:1 kill to death ratio, the legions will never decrease in number, as every victim will rise to join the ranks. And, we know that their kill/death ratio was likely much higher than 1:1, given how unprepared the brothers were, the stealth with which the wights attacked, and the savage ferocity with which wights fight. There are no better troops in a melee than wights.

I think this is precisely why the wildlings are marching south. They learned there is no way to defeat this enemy using conventional means. They realized that Wall was more than a border fence, and wanted across it asap.

And while their legions of undead will be many thousands less, now that the wildlings have made it south, we've no idea how great the numbers are of those that have already fallen to their advance. In the Varamyr Sixskins prologue we get a peek at what this advance looks like. They can swell their numbers using the Cold alone...without ever attacking directly.

Same here, as you may have guessed :) the more questions the better.

Yer I'm suggesting the wights were set in by WW so it'd make sense for there to be some WW nearby and it was the WW who were chasing the survivors and picking them off one by one.

Mostly with the advancing using the cold I'm sure this would only work on enemies who haven got an abundant fire nearby which would answer why they directly attacked the fist. The cold would defiantly "suffocate" small flame but surely late get fires would hold up

Using the fist as example I don't think the wall will hold without wildfire. I just really hope we get a lot of knowledge of WW In the next books... A nights king or one of his servants POV would be better than other povs (pun intended)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're not gonna get an Other pov, but info believe we will be seeing a lot more of them next book, and definitely finding out more. Bran's treenet hookup is bound to pay SOME dividends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're not gonna get an Other pov, but info believe we will be seeing a lot more of them next book, and definitely finding out more. Bran's treenet hookup is bound to pay SOME dividends.

A man can dream cant he?

Yes I'm expecting bran to really inform Jon In some way of info and history of the Others. (Assuming Jon is still defending the wall)

There are stories of how the first men or was it cotf that used ravens to actually repeat a sentence for them. Or you know warging a smart raven would get it done

Anyway one of my hopes for WOW is We get more info on WW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we'll get some Other and basic world info when the owner of the fat pink mast finally gets down and dirty with some historical texts in Oldtown, also.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we'll get some Other and basic world info when the owner of the fat pink mast finally gets down and dirty with some historical texts in Oldtown, also.

I second the motion and applaud your usage of “fat pink mast."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we'll get some Other and basic world info when the owner of the fat pink mast finally gets down and dirty with some historical texts in Oldtown, also.

I second the motion and applaud your usage of “fat pink mast."

Lol I think we've found the appropriate way to refer to Samwell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LmL, when you get a chance, I'm curious what you thought of this comment:






LOL. I'm down for a triple meaning as well. Hell, seven meanings per motif would be apt I think.



Perhaps I should have stated in that comment that I was talking about the First Men, who came into Westeros, and rather than adopt the Old Gods, sought to subdue them with fire and sword. Only after the Pact did First Men accept the Old Gods. For 2,000 years, they killed cotf, cut down weirwoods, and burned them. It is my belief that this act created the autoimmune response. Weirwoods are not immortal, but they are nearly eternal if left undisturbed. The same seems to be true of the Others.



It is my contention that in the act of killing the trees of life and death, First Men committed an act so unnatural, it had inhuman consequences. In my scenario, their fire and sword = the torch that created the seed that slowly grew into the long night.



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yer I'm suggesting the wights were set in by WW so it'd make sense for there to be some WW nearby and it was the WW who were chasing the survivors and picking them off one by one.

Mostly with the advancing using the cold I'm sure this would only work on enemies who haven got an abundant fire nearby which would answer why they directly attacked the fist. The cold would defiantly "suffocate" small flame but surely late get fires would hold up

Using the fist as example I don't think the wall will hold without wildfire. I just really hope we get a lot of knowledge of WW In the next books... A nights king or one of his servants POV would be better than other povs (pun intended)

I've also been looking at wildfire in terms of dealing with the cold perpetuated by the wights. Blanket-freezing would give the Others a huge advantage all round, which needs to be countered or balanced somehow. Makes me also wonder what Aerys originally had in mind when he deposited wildfire throughout KL. And wildfire has become one of Cersei's obsessions. I'm also speculating on the cold as a required ingredient in the spells that raise the dead. On another note, I'm making progress with my Patchface investigation and am convinced his so called prophecies are not really prophecies as such - instead they hold clues and information surrounding the Others. I suspect this pronouncement reveals the types of fire required to fight the Others:

Under the sea, smoke rises in bubbles, and flames burn green and blue and black. I know, I know, oh, oh, oh

Green fire = wildfire, Black = dragonfire, Blue =?. There is a passage somewhere describing the hottest types of fire as well, can't think of the wording right now.

I think we are in for something momentous - check this out from Dany's last chapter in ADWD:

She had bites all over her, little red bumps, itchy and inflamed. Where did all the ants come from? Dany brushed them from her arms and legs and belly. She ran a hand across her stubbly scalp where her hair had burned away, and felt more ants on her head, and one crawling down the back of her neck. She knocked them off and crushed them under her bare feet. There were so many … It turned out that their anthill was on the other side of her wall. She wondered how the ants had managed to climb over it and find her. To them these tumbledown stones must loom as huge as the Wall of Westeros. The biggest wall in all the world, her brother Viserys used to say, as proud as if he’d built it himself.

Spider crabs, red crabs now ants.... just saying :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the question ML just asked.Despite what the synopsis said the story has taken a completely different turn.From the moment there was an introduction of Dragons and Red Priest it became the battle of these forces. There is a reason why ice and fire in magic are known as primordial elements. They end and/or start an ages.

Edit: add my missing (s).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×