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The Dragon Demands

GRRM posts full unpublished version of "History of the Westerlands" from World book

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GRRM posted up the full original version of the "History of the Westerlands" up on his blog. As he notes, it is longer than the printed version in The World of Ice and Fire, which got edited down for length. He also notes that it's the version he gave at a few convention readings, so we've heard a few bits of this from previous reports.

This content raises some major issues. In most cases they're minor extra details which I'd consider canon because they don't contradict anything. On the other hand, the manner of how Ellyn Reyne died is entirely different.

With my copy of the World book open, I copy-pasted any section from this longer original version that didn't appear in the published version, and added it to a running list.

Here it is:


Though it must be admitted that Perestan makes a persuasive case in his Consideration of History, it is doubtful that the singers and storytellers will ever be convinced, for it is far more droll to believe that Lann won the Rock with lions, mice, or demons than by marriage.

The names of the mothers of this vast brood are not recorded, but if they were indeed all born of Lord Casterly’s daughter, she must have died a most exhausted woman.

King Morgon was supposedly a necromancer of terrible power, and it is written that as he lay dying, he told the Lannisters who had slain him (amongst them three of Loreon’s own sons) that he would return from the grave to wreak vengeance upon them one and all. To prevent that, Loreon had Morgon’s body hacked into a hundred pieces and fed to his lions. In a grisly aftermath, however, those selfsame lions broke loose two years later in the bowels of Casterly Rock, and slew the king’s sons, just as the Hooded King had promised.
).

Mention the "Age of a Hundred Kingdoms"
that Lady Cyrelle had been murdered by her uncle. The most common tale claimed that he had done the deed himself, smothering her with a pillow as she slept.


Pierced through with a spear as he clambered through the broken gates of Starpike, Tywald died in the arms of his twin brother Tion, who was serving as a squire to Prince Aegon Targaryen, King Maekar’s youngest son. The prince, it is said, fulfilled Tywald’s last request, and dubbed him a knight as he was dying.

King Maekar himself had perished less than an hour earlier, his crowned helm crushed by a rock dropped from the battlements as he led the attack on Starpike’s main gates. Others slain upon that grievous day included Lord Robert Reyne. Ser Roger Reyne (the Red Lion), his eldest son and heir, took a bloody vengeance after the battle, slaying seven captive Peakes before Prince Aegon arrived to halt the slaughter.
The chaos caused by the death of King Maekar I during the Storming of Starpike has been abundantly chronicled elsewhere, so we need not treat of it here. Suffice it to say that the matter of succession was so tangled that the King’s Hand, Lord Brynden (Bloodraven) Rivers summoned a Great Council to settle the issue. The assembled nobles, swayed in no small part by the eloquence (and, some suggest, the gold) of Lord Gerold the Golden, ultimately awarded the Iron Throne to Prince Aegon, who would rule the Seven Kingdoms for the next twenty-six years as King Aegon V (the Unlikely).


in the end he gave way, when his son Tion revealed that his brother had pleaded with him to “take care of Lady Ellyn” with his last words.

rain inside the Rock all year.” It is a fool’s privilege to make mock of the mighty, even lords and princes. Yet so proud and quick to anger was Ellyn Reyne that when the jape reached her ears, she commanded that Lord Toad be whipped. And so he was, for Lord Gerold was too sick to interfere, and Ser Tion his heir loved his lady with a passion and refused her nought.
The “Reign of the Reynes” was at an end, Lord Toad the hunchback declared, rejoicing. Lady Ellyn made one final attempt to cling to her place, declaring that she was with child by Ser Tion, but when the moons turned and her belly failed to swell, she was seen to be a liar. Lord Toad, it is said, was merciless in his mockery, to the fury of the Red Lion, who soon departed Casterly Rock for Castamere, accompanied by his brother and many of the other Reynes.
Lady Ellyn remained, but her influence dwindled away to nothing. No longer was she allowed access to the Lannister gold, nor called to council, nor included in decisions and deliberations, and though Lord Gerold permitted her to attend when he held court, she was not allowed to speak. Knights no longer begged tokens of her favor at tourneys, jewelers and dressmakers no longer lavished her with gifts in hopes of her patronage, petitioners no longer came to ask her to intercede for them before the court. And the singers who had once vied with one another to praise her face and form now sang of Lord Tytos’s young wife Jeyne instead, for that solemn, shy, plain-faced child had blossomed into a great beauty.


Lord of Tarbeck Hall, the florid fifty-five year old widowed lord of an ancient, honorable, but impoverished House. “A wallowing walrus of a man,” Lord Toad called him. “If bellies were brains, he might have been the wisest man in all the west.”
Though Lady Ellyn had not been able to give Ser Tion an heir, she proved more fertile with Walderan Tarbeck (who, it should be noted, had a number of older sons from his first two marriages). In 240 she gave him a daughter, whom she named Rohanne. In 241 another daughter, Cyrelle. Both these names were carefully chosen, Maester Belden points out. “Daggers aimed at Lord Gerold’s heart,” he calls them. In 242 Lady Tarbeck produced a son, a lusty red-haired boy she named Tion.
Though a squire as a youth, he was never knighted, and whilst he loved tourneys, it was always as a spectator, never a participant. A plump boy, he became a fat man, for he had a great fondness for cheese, cakes, and beer.
“My lord father would have made a splendid innkeep,” observed Gerion Lannister, the youngest of Lord Tytos’s four sons, years later, “but old Toad would have been a better lord.”
The lords of the westerlands had known Tytos Lannister since birth. A few did their best to support him, offering him sage counsel, and their swords when needed. The chief amongst these was Lord Denys Marbrand, Lady Jeyne’s father, who became a pillar of strength for his daughter and her lord husband.
Pirates from the Stepstones appeared in the waters offshore to prey upon merchantmen coming and going from Lannisport, and reavers from the Iron Islands harried the coast, carrying off wealth and women. Lord Tytos had no answer, but to dispatch ravens to Lord Quellon Greyjoy on Pyke, demanding that the ironmen desist.

The growing disrespect shown to House Lannister soon became a constant source of conflict between Lord Tytos and his brother Jason, nine years the younger. A fierce child, he grew into a prideful, quarrelsome youth with a fiery temper. Though often openly scornful of his elder brother himself, he was quick to take umbrage when others disparaged Lord Tytos. At fourteen, he got a serving girl at Casterly Rock with child, and sired his first bastard. At fifteen, he deflowered Lord Stackspear’s maiden daughter, getting her with child as well. Lord Tytos, in a rare display of firmness, insisted that his brother marry the girl (most believe this was done at the behest of his wife, the Lady Jeyne) only to have the poor girl die in childbirth. Anxious to avoid further scandals and further bastards, his lordship and Lady Jeyne allowed Jason only a fortnight to mourn, then compelled him to wed again, this time to Lord Prester’s daughter Marla. Though twice the age of her new lord husband, she would give him three trueborn daughters and two trueborn sons in the years that followed. And even Maester Belden confessed himself relieved when Jason Lannister departed the Rock to live with his lady wife at Feastfires.

As the power of House Lannister waned, other Houses grew stronger, more defiant, and more disorderly. Lord Farman of Fair Isle began to build a fleet of warships to defend his coasts against the ironmen, in defiance of Lord Tytos, who did not wish to give offense to the Greyjoys of Pyke. Three landed knights and a petty lord whose lands lay near the border between the westerlands and the Reach swore fealty to House Tyrell, declaring that Highgarden offered them more protection than Casterly Rock. Lords Jast and Falwell, embroiled in a private quarrel, decided to settle the matter with a melee rather than seek a ruling from the Lion’s Mouth. Nine men were killed, twenty-seven maimed and wounded, and still the quarrel raged on. Lord Stackspear doubled the taxes on his smallfolk, though Lord Tytos forbade it, then hired a company of Volantene sellswords to enforce his onerous exactions.

Was Tywin 10 or 12 in 254 AC? Dates conflict between versions.

Not long after, it was whispered about Casterly Rock that the lad and his father been heard shouting at each other in Lord Tytos’s solar. Some swore that Tywin had even struck his sire, though the truth of that was never proved. But within the fortnight, Lord Tytos dispatched his heir to King’s Landing, to serve as a cupbearer at King Aegon’s court. His lordship’s second son, Kevan, was sent away as well, to serve as page and later squire to the Lord of Castamere.

At her urging, Lord Tarbeck expanded his domain by buying the lands of the lesser lords and landed knights about him. . . and taking by f
orce the holdings of those who refused to sell.
Some of those thus dispossessed went to Casterly Rock for justice, but Lord Tytos shrugged off their complaints, or else refused to see them. Meanwhile, Lord and Lady Tarbeck built roads and septs and holdfasts, and brought ever more knights, archers, and men-at-arms into their service. Walderan Tarbeck had supported twenty household knights before his marriage to Ellyn Reyne; by 255 AC, that number had swollen to five hundred. Closely bound by bonds of blood and marriage, the Reynes of Castamere and the Tarbecks of Tarbeck Hall would soon constitute the most serious threat to Lannister rule in the west since Lann the Clever has winkled the Casterlys out of Casterly Rock.
And more grief awaited him, for three landed knights who had lost their lands to Lord and Lady Tarbeck had made their way to King’s Landing, to lay their grievance before King Aegon V. His Grace grew most wroth, it is written, and sent word to Casterly Rock, commanding Lord Tytos to deal with this matter forthwith, “lest we be forced to deal with ourselves.”
Spurred by the royal command, his lordship sent his grieving good-father, Lord Denys Marbrand, to ride in strength to Tarbeck Hall and deliver Lord and Lady Tarbeck to Casterly Rock, that they might be made to answer for their crimes. “Sweet words,” that old warrior is reported to have said upon hearing the command, “and long have I yearned to hear your lordship speak them.”
The outcome was less sweet. The Tarbecks had friends even within Casterly Rock, and knew of Lord Marbrand’s coming even before he set out. Lord Tytos had commanded his good-father sternly not to involve the Reynes “for we have no quarrel with Castamere,” but that did not stop Lady Tarbeck from sending to her brothers. Denys Marbrand and his knights were still two days ride from Tarbeck Hall when the Red Lion fell upon his camp in the night, slaying hundreds, amongst them old Marbrand himself. When word reached Casterly Rock, loud cries went out for war, and Maester Belden tells us that Lord Tytos “turned as purple as a plum, and could not speak for his wroth.”
Yet even before the banners could be called, Ser Reynard Reyne appeared at court with his easy smile and sly tongue, to make obesience before the Lion’s Mouth. Lord Marbrand’s death had been a “tragic misunderstanding,” Ser Reynard said; his brother had believed he was attacking a band of outlaws and robber knights. He offered sincere apologies and a blood price to House Marbrand… whereupon Tytos Lannister pardoned the Red Lion and the men who rode with him, and for good measure, absolved Lord and Lady Tarbeck as well, “for Lord Walderan has written us, foreswearing his past wrongdoing, and declaring that henceforth he shall be our most leal bannerman and servant.”
(Archmaester Perestan has suggested that Lord Tytos may have pardoned Lord Reyne and his men because his own son Kevan was amongst them. It may be so; we know for a certainly that Kevan Lannister was in service at Castamere at the time).

The years that followed were as dismal as any in the long history of the westerlands. Even those houses that had hitherto remained leal to Casterly Rock went their own way now, for Lord Tytos had proved himself unwilling or unable to enforce justice or punish malefactors, even those who slew men in his service. A score of private wars broke out across the west, as rival lords strove for land, gold, and power. Outlaws, broken men, and robber knights became a plague upon the land. Genna Lannister was carried off to the Twins and married to a Frey. Apprentices rioted in Lannisport, Quellon Greyjoy and his ironmen smashed Lord Farman’s fleet and plundered Fair Isle, septons and begging brothers began to preach openly against House Lannister and “the Lord of Misrule,” and all the while the Reynes and Tarbecks grew ever richer and more powerful.
His lordship’s brother was given command in his stead, but in 260 AC Ser Jason Lannister died on Bloodstone. (Later it would be put about that he was slain by Maelys the Monstrous himself, but contemporary accounts do not bear this out; it was a flux of the bowels that laid Ser Jason in his grave, not a foeman’s axe). After his death, Ser Roger Reyne seized command of the remaining westermen and led them to several notable victories. By the war’s end, the Red Lion was counted amongst the heroes of the fighting.
“Those who beheld these proud young lions on the battlefield might rightly wonder how such could ever have sprung from the loins of the quivering fool beneath the Rock,” Grand Maester Pycelle wrote scornfully in his Observations Upon the Recent Blood-Letting on the Stepstones.
With most of the great lords away at war for the best part of two years, the ruler of the westerlands in all but name became the lord who had stayed at home, Walderan Tarbeck, who was himself ruled by his wife, the Lady Ellyn.

Instead that reboubtable woman sent forth her own knights and captured three Lannisters (along with two sons of Lord Prester, and half a dozen common girls who had met them in the wood by Feastfires for purposes of dalliance).
Ser Tywin urged his lord father to comply with Lady Tarbeck’s request by returning Lord Walderan in three pieces, a suggestion that left Lord Tytos aghast. “Lady Ellyn holds my nephew’s life in her hands,” he told his son.
His brothers Kevan and Tygett went with him, one as a knight, one a squire. Lord Marbrand of Ashmark, Lord Prester of Feastfives, and a dozen lesser lords joined him on the march with their own levies, swelling his numbers.
ord Walderan Tarbeck was wounded and taken alive, with two of his sons from his second marriage (the only surviving son from his first marriage had died during the battle). “Well, you have us, boy,” Lord Tarbeck told Ser Tywin when he was led before him. “We’re worth a good ransom, as I am sure you know. Ask what you will, my lady wife will pay.”
“With our own gold,” Ser Tywin reportedly replied. “No, my lord. I think not.” Whereupon he gave a command, and watched cold-eyed as Lord Tarbeck and his sons were beheaded, together with his nephews and cousins,

When Ser Kevan Lannister approached under a peace banner to demand her surrender, she laughed at him, and said, “You are not the
only lions in the west, ser. My brothers are coming, and their claws are just as long and sharp as yours.”
Her defiance was misplaced. Tarbeck Hall was an old castle, and most of its defenders had ridden into battle with Lord Walderan, and were dead or fled. Those who remained were daunted by the size of the Lannister host, and dismayed to see the heads of their own lord and his sons impaled beneath their banners. (It may be also that some of those within had been suborned by Lannister gold, for Twyin Lannister was not a man to leave the outcome of any battle to chance, as subsequent decades would prove).
Trusting in her walls, Lady Tarbeck no doubt anticipated a long siege, but Ser Tywin sent his men-at-arms surging forward with ladders and grappling hooks and battering rams instead. The fighting lasted less than an hour, accounts agree. As the ram smashed through the castle’s main gates, two other gates were opened from within, and the Lannisters came swarming through. Those who fled were spared; those who fought were put to the sword. Ellyn Tarbeck herself was taken with her children, and thrown from the window of the castle’s tallest tower, to strangle kicking at the end of a noose. Her son Tion the Red preceded her in death, cut down in the fighting at the main gates. He was nineteen years of age when he died, the same age as Tywin Lannister. Her daughters Rohanne and Cyrelle, whose husbands had been beheaded with Lord Walderan, were taken alive, and spent the remainder of their lives with the silent sisters (accounts differ as to whether Ser Tywin first had their tongues removed).
Lady Ellyn’s elder daughter, Rohanne, was mother to a three-year-old son, remembered in the songs as “the last Lord Tarbeck.” The boy disappeared the day of the battle, never to be seen again. Those of a romantic bent believe that he was smuggled from the burning castle in disguise, grew to manhood across the narrow sea, and became a bard famed for his sad ballads. More reliable reports suggest that he was thrown down a well by Ser Amory Lorch, though whether this was done at the behest of Ser Tywin or without his knowledge remains in dispute.


The Red Lion arrived in time to see the flames, we are told. Two thousand men rode with him, all he had been able to gather in the short time available to him. Only one in ten was a knight. Given time, Lord Roger could have assembled a much larger host, for House Reyne had many friends in the west, and his own repute as a warrior would surely have drawn many freeriders, hedge knights, and sellswords to his side. In his haste to respond to his sister’s peril, however, his lordship had set forth with less than a quarter of his full strength, and driven them hard over long leagues, only to arrive at Tarbeck Hall hungry, exhausted, and too late.
Tywin Lannister had three times his strength, most accounts agree; some insist the Lannisters outnumbered the Reynes five to one. A more prudent commander would surely have fallen back rather than face such odds, but the Red Lion of Castamere had never been prudent. Hoping that surprise might carry the day, Roger Reyne commanded his trumpets to sound the attack, and charged headlong toward Ser Tywin’s camp.after the first shock the Lannisters recovered quickly, whereupon their numbers soon began to tell. Tywin Lannister himself led the counterattack.
hough not a mortal wound, the quarrel went deep enough to draw blood. The Red Lion rode on, swaying in the saddle,
The Lannister host, swollen to twice its original size by the arrival of the Lords Westerling, Banefort, Plumm, and Stackspear with their levies, arrived at Castamere three days later. Lord Reyne had sent forth ravens to his own friends, allies, and vassals, but few had turned up; the lesson of Tarbeck Hall had not been lost on them.
There were only three ways down into them, all cramped, narrow, twisting, and studded with deadfalls, pits, and murder holes. Two armored knights, standing side by side, could hold the largest tunnel against a thousand, for attackers had no way around, and if they tried to cut their way past, defenders would be pouring boiling oil and pitch down on them from murder holes above as they fought.
Once all his folk were safe inside the tunnels, Ser Reynard sent word to Ser Tywin above, offering terms. “You cannot fight your way in, and we have food and water sufficient for three years,” he wrote, “but grant us full pardon for any past offenses, and send your brothers down to us as hostages against deceit, and we shall once again be your true and leal servants.”
This time, however, his glib words fell upon deaf ears. Tywin Lannister did not honor Ser Reynard’s offer with a reply. Nor did he respond to Lord Roger’s offer to settle the matter by single combat (an offer Tywin might have accepted, had he known that the Red Lion had grown so weak he could hardly stand).

His cousin Lady Joanna, the daughter of Lord Tytos’s late brother Ser Jason, accompanied him to King’s Landing,

(Final version says that Joanna was already in King's Landing.)

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Lady Ellyn remained, but her influence dwindled away to nothing. No longer was she allowed access to the Lannister gold, nor called to council, nor included in decisions and deliberations, and though Lord Gerold permitted her to attend when he held court, she was not allowed to speak. Knights no longer begged tokens of her favor at tourneys, jewelers and dressmakers no longer lavished her with gifts in hopes of her patronage, petitioners no longer came to ask her to intercede for them before the court. And the singers who had once vied with one another to praise her face and form now sang of Lord Tytos’s young wife Jeyne instead, for that solemn, shy, plain-faced child had blossomed into a great beauty.


It might just be that I just spent ten minutes in a Valonqar thread, but this fits rather snugly with what I believe Cersei's fate will be. Losing all she has dear (her beauty, attention and power), having the "life" choked from her (basically, she's put in this position by force, such as Tommen expelling her from court), and cast down in favour of someone younger and more beautiful.


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It might just be that I just spent ten minutes in a Valonqar thread, but this fits rather snugly with what I believe Cersei's fate will be. Losing all she has dear (her beauty, attention and power), having the "life" choked from her (basically, she's put in this position by force, such as Tommen expelling her from court), and cast down in favour of someone younger and more beautiful.

I can get on board with this

Most people assume Cersei will have a quick fall and watch her children fall before her

I don't think it's that black and white, as with all prophecies we have seen there is a wiggle room potential

Onto topic, good work OP, as now that I can recall, other folk have talked about the differences in the reading at some places versus what we saw in text; this seems to go down as the 'canon' version if there was one

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Very interesting. With this new info it seems that Tywin's actions against the Tarbecks had more justification (they were stealing lands from neighbours, and the crown had given orders to intervene), and still, his cruelty and coldness against them is brought a little bit farther.



The information reggarding Kevan also makes him even more interesting. His position had to be very complex, being hosted and knighted by Roger Reyne, participating in the raid that killed old Lord Marbrand (his grandfather!?), and then becoming the head of the new band of tax collectors. (too bad that probably now we'll never know about his thoughts about it)


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ARMY NUMBERS DISCUSSION YAY!!!



The Red Lion arrived in time to see the flames, we are told. Two thousand men rode with him, all he had been able to gather in the short time available to him. Only one in ten was a knight. Given time, Lord Roger could have assembled a much larger host, for House Reyne had many friends in the west, and his own repute as a warrior would surely have drawn many freeriders, hedge knights, and sellswords to his side. In his haste to respond to his sister’s peril, however, his lordship had set forth with less than a quarter of his full strength, and driven them hard over long leagues, only to arrive at Tarbeck Hall hungry, exhausted, and too late.


Tywin Lannister had three times his strength, most accounts agree; some insist the Lannisters outnumbered the Reynes five to one. A more prudent commander would surely have fallen back rather than face such odds, but the Red Lion of Castamere had never been prudent. Hoping that surprise might carry the day, Roger Reyne commanded his trumpets to sound the attack, and charged headlong toward Ser Tywin’s camp.after the first shock the Lannisters recovered quickly, whereupon their numbers soon began to tell. Tywin Lannister himself led the counterattack.


hough not a mortal wound, the quarrel went deep enough to draw blood. The Red Lion rode on, swaying in the saddle,


The Lannister host, swollen to twice its original size by the arrival of the Lords Westerling, Banefort, Plumm, and Stackspear with their levies, arrived at Castamere three days later. Lord Reyne had sent forth ravens to his own friends, allies, and vassals, but few had turned up; the lesson of Tarbeck Hall had not been lost on them.


Reyne- 2000 is less then a quarter. That would thus be 8500~ men.

3 times that is 24k, which is what the Lannister army numbered (discounting the ridiculous 5 times that amount number). I assume this is the doubled counted by the later paragraph, with Banefort, Westerling, Plumm and Stackspear. Which would mean between them the Lannister's, Presters and Marbrands had 12 thousand men.

Which is 32k men.


Which leaves the major lord Farman, Crakehall, Swyft, Serret, Lydden, Lefford, Moreland, Jast, Estren, Brax, Kenning, Sarsfield and Tarbeck with about 18k men. Which I find pretty ridiculous. I'd include the Kenning's and Sarsfields in the 12k Lannister, Prester, Marbrand number, since those two are on the direct path to wherever Tarbeck Hall and Castamere are. Thus the other major lords can have about 2000 men each.

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You're not reading that right.



It talks about his friends and all these sellswords he could collect. That ~8000 figure is an army raised from allies and sellswords, not that the Reyne house strength is 8,000 strong. (It'd be like saying... I don't know, House Baratheon's strength is 100,000, because Renly had the Tyrells as allies. )



Had I a guess, the Reynes probably have a feudal following of 4,000, and with added allies and sellswords could augment to past double that.


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Ramsay's Penguins, i don't think GRRM is talking about the full number of men house Lannister can field just what tywin had with him at the time.



So i read it as tywin having three times the number of men with him as that reyne had with him for that battle, so that is 3 x 2000 = 6000.


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You're not reading that right.

It talks about his friends and all these sellswords he could collect. That ~8000 figure is an army raised from allies and sellswords, not that the Reyne house strength is 8,000 strong. (It'd be like saying... I don't know, House Baratheon's strength is 100,000, because Renly had the Tyrells as allies. )

Had I a guess, the Reynes probably have a feudal following of 4,000, and with added allies and sellswords could augment to past double that.

I did assume that those allies would be counted in there. Not really the sellswords though. They never seem to make up large parts of Westerosi armies. Thanks for clarifying.

Ramsay's Penguins, i don't think GRRM is talking about the full number of men house Lannister can field just what tywin had with him at the time.

So i read it as tywin having three times the number of men with him as that reyne had with him for that battle, so that is 3 x 2000 = 6000.

D'oh. Reading fail. Thanks.

Further comments. I want to know more about Falwell and the other Westerlords. Because of Lannister superiority we don't know much about the westerlands.

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I don't know if he'd plan to, but he may well do so over time since he doesn't seem to be planning a "BOOK OF THE SEVEN KINGDOMS" type project for his regional material, and a number of the regions are substantial enough that they can be worthwhile reading on their own.


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That is promising at least. Not that it is a necessity, but it'd be a shame if we never knew, especially if it is all set out already.


Clearly stuff before the Conquest is never going to happen (way to much, and it's good the way it is).


Likewise I don't think people care much for the history of Essos (although Slavers Bay was lacking, in world reasons aside), since that was covered pretty well, we have the picture.


Stuff that wouldn't be covered in Fire and Blood, such as wars of succession within the Great Houses, etc. That'd be great. Ahh dreams.


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I don't know that it's possible to check now that it's been replaced. Maybe it was cached somewhere? I'm guessing it's probably the same, as Yandel/Ran said that was the largest continuous bit of Martin's Gyldayn writing in the book.



Genna Lannister was carried off to the Twins and married to a Frey.




Love this characterization of Genna's engagement.


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The history of the conquest sample that this replaced on his website was the same as the printed version, right?

Here is a snapshot by the Wayback Machine at the Internet Archive.

Is this info okay to add to the wiki? For instance, it indicates the Lannisters of Lannisport rule the city, which had not been confirmed before (in contrast, the Arryns of Gulltown merely live in Gulltown). If we can use it, which version should be used when accounts conflict, such as the death of Ellyn?

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