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Song from Joffrey's wedding relates to the fifth book?

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Collio began with his version of “The Dance of the Dragons,” which was more properly a song for two singers, male and female. Tyrion suffered through it with a double helping of honey-ginger partridge and several cups of wine. A haunting ballad of two dying lovers amidst the Doom of Valyria

I just want to clarify that I have not read the 4th or 5th book, I am just making an assumption based of the name of the 5th book. And if you have any insight of events from books 4 or 5 I don't want to know. I am currently at the part where Jamie returns to Kings Landing.

When reading Joffrey's wedding this section stood out to me. I first thought the name of the song was the same as the fifth book, but it's obviously different (The Dance of the Dragons/A Dance With Dragons). Not all songs and prophecies are 100% true in the books but they do seem to foreshadow.

Basically all I know of the song is what's above, two lovers (male female based off the male and female singers) dying amidst the doom of valyria. I am assuming for two lovers to have a ballad sung of them means that they were important or powerful people, and their deaths were as a result of the doom of valyria somehow.

Based off this and the similarity of the names I am thinking this may repeat itself in the future with the fall of the current "empire" under the Lannister's rule. I am not sure who dies, or who would be responsible. My current guesses are that the two lovers will be Jamie and Cersie, and the others will overwhelm the realm creating chaos. I don't believe the Dragons refer to Daenerys, I believe the mention of Dragons refers to the song. I originally thought the 5th book's title was when Daenerys comes to Westeros, but now I think it's in reference to this song instead.

Anyone else have an opinion on this? I am not an indepth reader that tracks all the prophecies so I may be way off base, but I am just wondering if any other slow readers had the same opinion.

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You misquoted the part. The entire quote of the book is



Then the heralds summoned another singer; Collio Quaynis of Tyrosh, who had a vermilion beard and an accent as ludicrous as Symon had promised. Collio began with his version of "The Dance of the Dragons," which was more properly a song for two singers, male and female. Tyrion suffered through it with a double helping of honey-ginger partridge and several cups of wine. A haunting ballad of two dying lovers amidst the Doom of Valyria might have pleased the hall more if Collio had not sung it in High Valyrian, which most of the guests could not speak. But "Bessa the Barmaid" won them back with its ribald lyrics. Peacocks were served in their plumage, roasted whole and stuffed with dates, while Collio summoned a drummer, bowed low before Lord Tywin, and launched into "The Rains of Castamere."



What Tyrion is thinking here, is that, while the singer is singing the song "The Dance of the Dragons", a song about two lovers dying in the Doom might have been better liked by the guests, instead of this song about a civil war (had the singer actually sung the song in the Common Tongue, and not in High Valyrian).



So "The Dance of the Dragons" is not a song about two lovers dying in the Doom.. it is a clear reference to the civil war which erupted in 129 AC, when King Viserys I died, and his son took the throne as Aegon II, despite his sister, Rhaenyra, having been Viserys' heir. Rhaenyra challanged Aegon's claim, leading to two and a half years of fighting, and ending with the coronation of one of Rhaenyra's sons, Aegon III.



The first two years of the civil war are described in the novella The Princess and the Queen, if you are interested, and The Rogue Prince, details mostly all that led to the war. You can read about the ending of the war in The World of Ice and Fire, which also repeats some of the info from The Princess and the Queen, and The Rogue Prince, though not in the same detail.


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