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VicAndTheSquidSquad

Top 5 favorite fantasy series?

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52 minutes ago, aceluby said:

It's now in my top 3, top if you include completely finished series.  Only ones I enjoy more are ASOIAF and Fitz & Fool/Live Traders, but neither of those are completely done yet.

Only a year or so to wait! :D 

I've made a start on Dagger and Coin. Read the first book which I thought was a very strong start to the series. Planning to continue, probably make it part of my summer reading

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Can't remember if I posted in the great dead period...but I will add my $.02.

For people of a certain age, Lord of the Rings is simply not open to rational discussion or critique. It shares a place in popular culture along with Catcher in the Rye, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band...works that simply transcend their intended genre and literally become their own genre. They are of a unique time, but ultimately timeless. I can mark my life by before and after with these works.

Now, with the less esoteric list thingee (people do love lists)

In no particular order:

The Broken Empire --- Mark Lawrence. A Distopian Future...An empire without an emperor...a king of the dead in the drowned English Isles...and an angry, psychopathic young man bent om revenge. Jorg Ancarth is not anti-heroic..he'd have to be somewhat heroic for that. But he is unrelenting, angry, and, interestingly makes the ultimate sacrifice for...love?

The First Law --- Joe Abercrombie. Is this the story of Logen Nine-Fingers, a barbarian running from his bloody past into a bloody future?  Jezal dan Luther, a spoiled, arrogant gadfly who stumbles into a destiny he is not suited for? Sand Dan Glokta, the crippled torturer who was once a hero of the Kingdom? Bayaz...the puppetmaster? Some of the best drawn secondary characters also. pLUS---The Bloody Nine is iconic.

The Acts of Caine --- Matt Stover  Not sure if this is Fantasy or Sci-fi, but Hari Michaelson/Dominic Shade/Jonathan Fist/Caine is the most compelling anti-hero/hero/demi-god/enemyofGod/God/super asshole ever.

The Farseer/Fitz and the Fool Cycle --- Robin Hobb  Sometime you just want to slap Fitz upside the head, but this is good stuff.

A Song of Ice and Fire --- GRRM  If the Winds of Winter isn't better than A Dance With Dragons...there might be problems. 

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6 minutes ago, Crowjack said:

The Acts of Caine --- Matt Stover  Not sure if this is Fantasy or Sci-fi, but Hari Michaelson/Dominic Shade/Johnathan Fist/Caine is the most compelling anti-hero/hero/demi-god/enemyofGod/God/super asshole ever.

:agree: I've never fallen in love with a bad person so fast. One of fantasy's most interesting protagonists, and probably my favorite.

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On ‎3‎/‎31‎/‎2016 at 3:45 PM, First of My Name said:

:agree: I've never fallen in love with a bad person so fast. One of fantasy's most interesting protagonists, and probably my favorite.

Hoping Stover will revisit this series...soon.

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47 minutes ago, Crowjack said:

Hoping Stover will revisit this series...soon.

Me too, me too... He said something on Facebook about this a few months ago, I believe the essence was that while the Acts of Caine series is over, there's a possibility that he'll return to the world those books are set in. 'The Acts of Caine are over, but the Age of Caine is just beginning,' I believe is what he said. So I guess we're both in and out of luck?

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Ok,my first posting and I am slightly drunk so forgive any misspelled words ok? here is my top 5. 1 the Black company by Glen Cook.If you have never read Cook you have no idea what a fun read you are missing.The taken are the most entertaining villians I have read-There are really no GOOD guys in the series,check it out and be entertained. 2Asoif- nothing needs to said-you all know.3 The Riftwar saga-grabbed me from the start with Pug and Tomas.4 Tarzan novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs-The Tarzan in the novels hasn`t ever made it to the movies fully,you get lost civilizations,dinosaurs and even lost Roman civilizations in the novels,5 Shannara-bleak and dark look into the future very entertaining,edspecially the heritage of Shannara novels.Hopefully some of you guys will check out the stuff you haven`t read and enjoy these stories like I have,oh, Lord of the Isles by David Drake and Memory,Sorrow and Thorn really deserve to be on the list too,but my number 1 advise is check out the Black Company,I think it`s  the most underrated fantasy out there-you will love Lady and Croaker,one eye and Goblin and soulcatcher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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yup.Brooks is pretty bleak,Cook does that too-one of the his Black Company books is titled Bleak seasons,lmao,MTV seems to being a little better with Shannara Than the Goodkind adaption was,Allanon wasn`t what he should have been in the episodes I saw,though

 

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After the first book they're reasonably dark. Many good guys die, the world is generally on a downward arc. 

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On 28 December 2015 at 7:28 PM, peterbound said:

That list makes me sad for you.

lol

 

anyway:

after 9 pages, I see no mention of:- 

1. Peter Morwood: The Book of Years (Horse Lord, etc)

2. Louise Cooper: The Time Master Trilogy (the associated pre and post series were pleasant but didn't have the same intensity)

 

I am sad for everyone

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Nothing new here but I'm helpless against list threads.

JRR Tolkien - The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion.  Lord of the Rings is my favorite book by a fair margin.  It's not a series but others have included it so I will as well.  

Michelle Sagara West - The Sacred Hunt, The Sun Sword, The House War, Cast series.  Probably my favorite currently active fantasy author.  I prefer her work under the West name but the Cast series is great as well.

Gene Wolfe - Book of the New Sun.  This one might not count according to OP's guidelines but I'll include it anyway.

George RR Martin - Song of Ice and Fire.  This one became harder to enjoy when it became a TV show.  Not impossible, though, and it still ranks among my favorites pretty easily.

Steven Erikson - Malazan Book of the Fallen.  I hated Gardens of the Moon when I first read it.  What a difference a little perseverance makes.

Felix Gilman, Robin Hobb, Robert Jackson Bennett, JK Rowling and Robert Jordan all merit honorable mentions but were not included in the top five for one reason or another. 

 

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22 hours ago, SerTarod said:

lol

 

anyway:

after 9 pages, I see no mention of:- 

1. Peter Morwood: The Book of Years (Horse Lord, etc)

2. Louise Cooper: The Time Master Trilogy (the associated pre and post series were pleasant but didn't have the same intensity)

 

I am sad for everyone

Neither are kindle, so I probably won't be looking them up.

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In no order:

Lyonesse Trilogy - Jack Vance  A classic fairy tale. The writing is formal and beautiful, and heightened throughout with irony and a dry, dark humor.

The Dark Tower - Stephen King  Particularly the first 4 books, but I enjoyed the series as a whole.  Roland winning his guns from Cort is one of my all time favorite scenes.

First Law - Joe Abercrombie  A ripping good yarn.  Great, great fun to read.

The Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien  I first read these as an adult and found them very moving.  The link between the choices of individuals and the outcome of events larger than these individuals is powerful.  Faramir's choice to let the hobbits and gollum continue their journey is another favorite scene.

Godhead Trilogy - James Morrow  My first exposure to religious satire, concepts of theodicy, and the tension between (Christian) religious dogma and secular humanism.  Morrow covers all this ground while being consistently funny.  These were important books to me through my early 20's.

 

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6 hours ago, ants said:

Neither are kindle, so I probably won't be looking them up.

Thats a pity. But I do understand. Both stories were published in the eighties and as their popularity (sadly) didn't sustain continuous prints a la Eddings or Brooks etc, are now most likely out of print and for those reasons also unlikely to ever make the grade of e-pub content. Having said that Peter Morwood wrote a prequel (two books) to the Book of Years series, called the Clan Wars, which are on Kindle, which is strange. The Clan Wars are a pleasant read, but imo don't have the same original intensity and therefore are not a proper reflection of his writing of that world.

Again, despite my tongue in cheek post above, they form part of a bunch of authors/series (being most of the names and titles previously mentioned by the posters above) that were very entertaining and meaningful to me. 

 

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37 minutes ago, Darth Richard II said:

I'm still trying to get over Terry Brooks: Master of GrimDark

He didn't say it was GrimDark, he said it was a grim and bleak look into the future. I'm not sure how you could argue that? Unless you think the future as painted is superior to what we have now?

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The ones with the elves and dwarves and magic and faeries? Often mocked in these parts as being mostly a LotR ripoff to begin with and super light fare more suitable to young readers? Are you next going to tell me that Star Wars is a dark and gritty re telling of the war of the roses? Not to mention it didn't become "Our future" til he ret conned the shit out of it post 9/11.

I seriously hope I'm being trolled at this point. You might as well start shelving Mercedes Lackey under horror if Brooks looks grim and bleak.

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Well, fairly easy to decide for me:

1- Malazan Cycle

2- Bakker's Second Apocalypse

3- Janny Wurts Light and Shadow

4- Glen Cook's Instrumentalities

The fifth spot has too many candidates.

The reason for the first four spots is also fairly simple: there's not something else that is similar to those works in the genre, but more importantly, it won't happen even in the future. Those works will remain unique in the course of history.

Instead I see the various Abercrombie, Martin, Sanderson, Rothfuss, Lawrence and so on, are far more likely to be reshaped in many forms in the future. They are the fuel of the market.

Those four instead are something you can read now or never, but no future writer will try to do something similar.

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These are my top 4:

  1. The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson
  2. The Discworld series by Terry Pratchett
  3. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
  4. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin

I can't really put a number 5 in yet, hopefully by the end of this year when I will have finished Bakker as well as Janny Wurts Wars of Light and Shadow and see how they compare with Glen Cook's Black Company and Mark Lawrence's Broken Empire.

These are standalones that easily make their way into any of my "Top Fantasy" lists

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North

The Lions of Al-Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

 

 

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